Throw rings

The friendliest place on the web for anyone who enjoys boating.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

kpinnn

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2012
Messages
146
Location
USA
Vessel Name
Periwinkle
Vessel Make
Gulfstar 36
It has been two years since I bought a throw ring. Yes every two years the line on the outside of the ring rots. The ring itself is fine. They are not cheap and prices do very considerably. Sooo is everyone simply constantly replacing them or is there a better ring?
Ken
 
I don't use rings, I have a LifeSling mounted on the stern. It is in a fiberglass box so no sun damage.
 
It has been two years since I bought a throw ring. Yes every two years the line on the outside of the ring rots. The ring itself is fine. They are not cheap and prices do very considerably. Sooo is everyone simply constantly replacing them or is there a better ring?
Ken
=====================
I have one with about 4 years.

bought it because the price was right to replace an old yellow sling thingy, when the outside lines get to your state will just pull them and tie a line to the ring.

The outside lines look very “nautical and yachtie" but really?
 
They use polypropylene line because it floats, but has very little resistance to UV degradation, even in black. If it's white or yellow it will degrade very quickly. There's no requirement to even have a line attached on a pleasure boat, so you can just cut the line off, or replace with a more durable type like nylon. Just be aware you could foul it in your props. Having the line attached can actually be counter productive, if you can't turn around to pick up your MOB within the line's length, you'll pull it away from them. May as well not even have a life ring if that's going to happen.
On commercial boats more than one ring is usually required, but only one should have a line. You throw the one(s) without (and/or anything else that floats) when the person first falls overboard, then throw the lined one when you're along side the MOB and ready to pick them up.
 
They use polypropylene line because it floats, but has very little resistance to UV degradation, even in black. If it's white or yellow it will degrade very quickly. There's no requirement to even have a line attached on a pleasure boat, so you can just cut the line off, or replace with a more durable type like nylon. Just be aware you could foul it in your props. Having the line attached can actually be counter productive, if you can't turn around to pick up your MOB within the line's length, you'll pull it away from them. May as well not even have a life ring if that's going to happen.
On commercial boats more than one ring is usually required, but only one should have a line. You throw the one(s) without (and/or anything else that floats) when the person first falls overboard, then throw the lined one when you're along side the MOB and ready to pick them up.

"Having the line attached can actually be counter productive, if you can't turn around to pick up your MOB within the line's length, you'll pull it away from them. May as well not even have a life ring if that's going to happen."
Excellent point!!!!
 
Some confusion here as OP is referring to the line looped around the rink ( I believe) others talking about a 50 ft linevattached for retrieval.
AFAIK.... Attached line required in Canada but nit in US. I keep a 50 ft floating in a throw bag with a snap carabiner next to the ring. It's in a bag and protected from UV. Attach or not depending on situation. Also floating cushions vs rings... satisfy reqmts in US forcrecreational use... unless a chartered vessel then rings are req'd ( I believe)
 
A Lifesling is not a throwable according to USCG PFD requirements...a good thing but does not fulfill a throwable requirement.

Once the outer line is damaged, unless you replace it in kind, I doubt the ring meets USCG requirements.

As posted, a line attached for rec vessels in the US is not required, buy having 50- 100' standing by to snap on can come in handy.
 
I keep a throw bag handy, as going outside the cabin is a PFD required area on my boat. The crew member (or me) should be floating just fine. The throw bag then allows recovery within a 30 foot radius. Both ends of the throw line have carbiners so the MOB, once clipped on, can't float away during recovery should they lose grip.

Whether ring or bag, best to try a few test throws. You may find that railings, stanchions, bimini, rigging, etc., interfere with your favorite method of throwing or your intended place to throw from.
 
Yeah, I read that at first to mean the 50 foot line attached. But the four short lines strung around the ring, I think removing or changing those would probably void the USCG approval. I can't see any real purpose for them, but the ring was approved with them.
 
The lines are to wrap your arms through if your hands are inoperable because of hypothermia, injury or any other of a bunch of reasons. Sure you can just put an arm through the ring but in any kind of wave action your arm pit will hurt in minutes and it also might tend to slip out.
 
I suspect the poly line used on those is intentional "planned obsolescence." I try to store the ring out of the sun when not underway, although I keep promising myself to just make a Sunbrella cover for it.
 
I replace mine every few years with Samson MFP Floatline. Mainly because I have a 600' spool (less some now) of it in my lazarette for use as a sternline.
 
I figured the loops of line on the throw ring were to catch it with a boat hook to pull the MOB closer.
 
It has been two years since I bought a throw ring. Yes every two years the line on the outside of the ring rots. The ring itself is fine. They are not cheap and prices do very considerably. Sooo is everyone simply constantly replacing them or is there a better ring?
Ken
I assume you’re talking about the rings where the line is sewn into some webbing on the ring.
There’s another style of ring where there is a set of holes cast into the ring and the rope is threaded through it. You can make up your own lines to replace them whenever they need it.
 
A Lifesling is not a throwable according to USCG PFD requirements...a good thing but does not fulfill a throwable requirement.

Once the outer line is damaged, unless you replace it in kind, I doubt the ring meets USCG requirements.
Both those statements are wrong. The Lifesling DOES meet the USCG requirement ( Sites-WestMarine-Site ) , and the line around the ring is irrelevant. A cushion is an approved throwable device and of course they don't have lines.
 
Last edited:
I assume you’re talking about the rings where the line is sewn into some webbing on the ring.
There’s another style of ring where there is a set of holes cast into the ring and the rope is threaded through it. You can make up your own lines to replace them whenever they need it.
Thanks for the tip on rings with cast holes. Yeah, replacing the rope on my rings is a hassle, they are stitched down tight and a mess to rip out and replace. I'm a ring tosser followed up by throw bag and ladder recovery at swim platform.
 
For anyone that has never practiced tossing a life ring... try it!
It is much more difficult than many expect and worth practicing to located a suitable place aboard to swing it and to find a technique that you can get reasonable distance and accuracy.
A throw bag is MUCH easier to achieve distance and accuracy.
 
For those in Canada, a life bouy (ring) with heaving line is mandatory over 29.5'. LifeSling isn't approved.
 
>For those in Canada>

And for those transiting Canada?
If you are visiting from the US, if your boat meets the requirements there, you are good.


Foreign pleasure craft (pleasure craft that are licensed or registered in a country other than Canada) need to comply with equipment requirements of the country in which the vessel is usually kept.

If you are not a resident of Canada and are using a pleasure craft licensed or registered in Canada, all of the required safety equipment must meet Canadian safety requirements. However, you may opt to bring your own PFD for your own personal use.


PFD requirements are more stringent in Canada. Not sure why.
 
Last edited:
...A cushion is an approved throwable device and of course they don't have lines.
No, but they do have straps for putting your arms through. Without digging that deeply into the CFRs, my suspicion is that the rope loops are there on the throw ring to satisfy a US requirement.
 
No, but they do have straps for putting your arms through. Without digging that deeply into the CFRs, my suspicion is that the rope loops are there on the throw ring to satisfy a US requirement.
Thank you, beat me to it on the arm straps and I stand corrected on the Lifesling meeting the throwable requirement.

I remember the debate whether it should be a Type IV or not...part of the same debate whether throwables should have permanent retrieval lines.
 
Last edited:
No, but they do have straps for putting your arms through. Without digging that deeply into the CFRs, my suspicion is that the rope loops are there on the throw ring to satisfy a US requirement.
I have the CFR's in front of me. There is a line in there about how you can't have any deteriorated straps that will break when pulled on, there is nothing that says there has to be a rope on a throw ring. I mean, that's why it's a ring, so you can loop your arm through it.
 
Maybe there is no requirement for tbe line around the ring....

I can only imagine trying to get a good toss of a ring without a line around it. Got a bit of experience in sea survival stuff. Also rescued many a hypothremic victim and just an arm through the ring in choppy water just doesnt cut it in my opinion.

Thus my "guess" the line might be part of the approval package....kinda like the madated USCG approved bracket for fire extinguishers.
 
Even if the line isn't required for a ring to be approved, I'd expect the approval for a specific ring is based on what components it has. So if it started out with a line, it would be expected to have one.
 
Approval is most likely based on minimum specs, improvements that don't affect the minimum specs probably don't addect certification...

This is what I found in quick search....may only apply to commercial like the retrieval line.... 46CFR160.150

"
c) Grab line. The finished length of the grab line shall be at least four times the outside
diameter of the buoy, and no longer than ten percent greater than that minimum length.
The grabline shall be secured at four equidistant points around the buoy's circumference
to form four equal loops. The ends of the grab line shall be securely and neatly spliced
together, or shall be hand whipped with a needle and both ends securely and smoothly
seized together. The grab line shall encircle the buoy and shall be held in place by the
beckets. The spliced or seized ends of the grab line shall be placed in the center of the
width of one of the beckets"
 
Last edited:
Back
Top Bottom