Helmsman 31 - Just shipped to me in Seattle

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Huge number of seals out yesterday afternoon all around the container ship.
 

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Where does the boat go for the remains of commissioning? I see you went through the Ballard Lock, so somewhere on the ship canal?
 
Is yours the one that's going in the show? If so, that was some "just in time" shipping. Will stop to say hello at the show, likely Monday.
 
Initially it will be over at the Helmsman docks along Westlake Ave. Yep, we need to start up, test, & balance the reverse cycle units - 2 x 8kbtu units. Plus test the genset. These boats don't really need a lot of commissioning - even the swim-step was already installed. We just picked up the prewired mast and put it in place - took 5 minutes.

Where does the boat go for the remains of commissioning? I see you went through the Ballard Lock, so somewhere on the ship canal?
 
This is my personal boat. And there was no way to get it into that show. It was going to be put in the show but it arrived too late - but there is a spec 31 in the boat show. And mine can be viewed a short distance away if you want to see it. The one in the show has propane - mine has a convection microwave, Kenyon all glass induction cooktop (no pups), reverse cycle vs diesel forced air.

Where does the boat go for the remains of commissioning? I see you went through the Ballard Lock, so somewhere on the ship canal?

Is yours the one that's going in the show? If so, that was some "just in time" shipping. Will stop to say hello at the show, likely Monday.
 
Congratulations! The boat looks great. Its nice that Scott shrink wraps the boats for their journey home to new owners.


John T.
H38E
 
Fuel Burn on the Seasall S240 in a run today was:

6.2 knots burning 0.871gph at 1,410 rpm

This is very quiet engine. The engine room hatch gaskets have also been enhanced. Really nice sound on the interior even when we got up to about 13.2 knots. Zero vibration across the entire range. Pretty sure this boat could be run all day and not wear you out with noise.
 

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7.04 nmpg at 6.2 knots... Very Nice! How much fuel does she carry. I'm luven your boat.
 
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That is impressive fuel economy for that waterline. My 40' sailboat gets the same speed at .75 gph with 56hp at 2000 rpm. However, my sailboat has a LWL of about 36'. Yours must be closer to 29'?
 
That is impressive fuel economy for that waterline. My 40' sailboat gets the same speed at .75 gph with 56hp at 2000 rpm. However, my sailboat has a LWL of about 36'. Yours must be closer to 29'?

I think his reflects the fact that Hyundai has been building fuel efficient engines a long time. It was an area of emphasis with them before it was with many others, from commercial and industrial to automotive.
 
150 gallons of fuel (also 100 gallons of water)

7.04 nmpg at 6.2 knots... Very Nice! How much fuel does she carry. I'm luven your boat.
 
It's about 26.5' LWL

That is impressive fuel economy for that waterline. My 40' sailboat gets the same speed at .75 gph with 56hp at 2000 rpm. However, my sailboat has a LWL of about 36'. Yours must be closer to 29'?
 
The Hyundai Seasall is a dedicated marine design - not a marinized version of an existing design.

So its operating characteristics - quietness, smoothness, fuel economy - are purpose built to the marine environment. Which is why it sells so well overseas.


I think his reflects the fact that Hyundai has been building fuel efficient engines a long time. It was an area of emphasis with them before it was with many others, from commercial and industrial to automotive.
 
The Hyundai Seasall is a dedicated marine design - not a marinized version of an existing design.

So its operating characteristics - quietness, smoothness, fuel economy - are purpose built to the marine environment. Which is why it sells so well overseas.

I didn't mean to imply otherwise. The same expertise you develop in one engine area helps you in others as well, though.
 
Apologies if it seemed I was saying that! I was just affirming the purpose-built qualities in between other work!

I didn't mean to imply otherwise. The same expertise you develop in one engine area helps you in others as well, though.
 
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Apologies if it seemed I was saying that! I was just affirming the purpose-built qualities in betwixt other work!

Most in the US don't really realize all Hyundai does or the size of the company in total. That said, there are a lot fewer support locations in the US than for some of the other brands.
 
That is true. But in the PNW there are enough for me to feel comfortable. Plus, engine tech is so good these days. I know Helmsman has never had a single engine related problem in any boat ever - Cummins or Hyundai.

Even Volvo, I think, has mostly had problems related to engine mounts. Fleming uses MAN engines (also I think) and they switched over to SeaTorque and softer engine mounts to eliminate troubles related to alignment and engine mount/alignment issues in general.

I didn't mean to imply otherwise. The same expertise you develop in one engine area helps you in others as well, though.

Most in the US don't really realize all Hyundai does or the size of the company in total. That said, there are a lot fewer support locations in the US than for some of the other brands.
 
Most in the US don't really realize all Hyundai does or the size of the company in total.

Very true. Hyundai amongst many other activities is, through its subsidiary HMM Hyundai Merchant Marine, the 9th container carrier in the US which counts like customers Wal Mart Stores, Target & Best Buy Co. it's the world 15th largest container shipping company, the South Korea's largest sea carrier, fleet > 115 ships, plus ~ 20 charter vessels operated, plus 5 or 6 more tankers coming soon, in a particularly very difficult competitive market where HMM is trying to stay afloat while Hanjin collapsed last year.
 
Very interesting to learn more about Hyundai. When they first started marketing cars in the USA, I and many other Americans discounted them as the new kid on the block who'd never amount to much. Then I saw their cars develop a reputation for reliability, fit and finish, economy and comfort. Over the years I noticed their name on many industrial machines from forklifts to large trucks to mining equipment to ships. When I saw this thread and learned about David's engine choice, I...for a moment...had similar thoughts, then immediately read his attachments on the engine. I was completely wrong. They're not the new kid on the block.

How long has Helmsman been offering Hyundai engines in their boats? Are there other Helmsman models that can be ordered with them?
 
The Hyundai Seasall is a dedicated marine design - not a marinized version of an existing design.

So its operating characteristics - quietness, smoothness, fuel economy - are purpose built to the marine environment. Which is why it sells so well overseas.

I believe that the base engine is derived of the same family of diesels Hyundai has used for years in a number of automobiles.
If you look online you will find reference to the S series of Hyundai 3.0 liter engines of the same bore, stroke and general layout used overseas.
Not that there is anything wrong with the engine family being well vetted before use in the marine world... My truck has a Cummins 6.7 diesel, the same family as the engine in our soon to be completed American Tug! I believe that the Cummins showed up in the Dodge truck before it was used in the marine world, didn't it?
Bruce
 
When they first started marketing cars in the USA, I and many other Americans discounted them as the new kid on the block who'd never amount to much. Then I saw their cars develop a reputation for reliability, fit and finish, economy and comfort.

They made one of the all time brilliant marketing plays and that was their 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty when they started going after the US market seriously. People didn't have confidence in their cars but felt like with the warranty that if it broke, they were covered. Even the low prices wouldn't have gotten them where they needed to go without the warranty. They also went aggressively after dealerships and provided them solid support.
 
They made one of the all time brilliant marketing plays and that was their 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty when they started going after the US market seriously. People didn't have confidence in their cars but felt like with the warranty that if it broke, they were covered. Even the low prices wouldn't have gotten them where they needed to go without the warranty. They also went aggressively after dealerships and provided them solid support.


First or second year they came into U.S. my girl friend purchased one due to price, gas mileage and the guarantee. Not too bad a scoot-round-town car. Guarantee was the really good sales gimmick... it worked!
 
Our second car is a Hyundai i40 wagon. 2L engine could use more torque but otherwise a comfortable good value wagon.Still in warranty( 5 years here) but zero warranty done unless the dealer quietly fixed things, and no recalls. Hyundai has come a long way from its early cars,much like Japanese makers. It is no surprise they would build a good marine engine.
 
The Glendinning fully electronic controls mated to this Seasall S240 are really nice (ZF, Seasall, Glendinning). Essentially gives a luxury feel when maneuvering the boat. Immediate smooth response with no sponginess when moving between detent points while shifting.

Which makes docking feel much more confident. I think for someone new to boats this size and relative heaviness, it would make learning much less confusing in terms of personal sensory input from friction feedback when moving the shifter - and because the detent points are VERY clear and precise.
 

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Added a Gas/Water Separator to the WhisperGen genset this week. It is a Netherlands made product with a Kubota engine. This meant installing a thru-hull. Made a substantial difference.

Next I will be installing some vibration isolators under the genset itself.
 

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I hope Bob Warman is still collecting his royalties on these hulls.
 
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What's the thu hull with the big hose with no valve? Or am I looking at that pic wrong? Oh wait, maybe that's an exhaust hose?

And I wonder if there is a thread mismatch on those thru hulls with the ball valves screwed on.
 
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