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katsailing 02-07-2015 11:32 AM

Problems with Trawlers
 
Hi Everyone!

We are still searching for a Trawler, spent the last several days in Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey looking at Used Trawlers.

The problems we are finding are as such:
1)Black oil left in tanks or metal shavings, we have seen this when pulling the dip stick out to check the oil.
2)Water damage, rotten aft cabins, headliners removed with rotted wood underneath, teak decks with planks coming up and screw holes exposed.
Can any of this be fixed and if so is it very costly?
Should we just look elsewhere? This has been very discouraging for me and my husband, especially my husband since he would be the repair person for these things.
Also, if we were living aboard does anyone know if any of these could be fixed while we live on aboard or do you think we should have a backup plan?
We also still have two cats that will be aboard with us, where would we put them?!
Sorry, but we need to find something soon and our price range is limited.:confused:

cardude01 02-07-2015 11:35 AM

What is your price range?

ksanders 02-07-2015 11:37 AM

Yes, the things you are seeing are normal

AND

No, the things you are seeing are not normal.

Generally the "you get what you pay for" rule applies.

If you look at higher priced boats they will for the most part be in much better condition.

Sometimes you get lucky and find a bargain, but not often.

katsailing 02-07-2015 11:38 AM

Price Range
 
Pricing Boats from $25,000 to $40,000 and 40 is pushing it for us with limited funds.

cardude01 02-07-2015 11:59 AM

Problems with Trawlers
 
Oh. That's a pretty low budget for an up to date liveaboard trawler.

How about expanding your search to houseboats with outboards maybe? Good living space and 4 stroke outboards get decent economy if you run them slow.

You could buy this, sell the giant outboards and replace with two smaller 4 strokes and you are set!

https://miami.craigslist.org/mdc/boa/4833798100.html

Edit: I see they will sell for $8500'without huge outboards also. You can get two new Suzuki 50hp high thrust outboards for $11000. So you have a cool liveaboard with brand new engines for under $20000. 👍

https://gainesville.craigslist.org/bod/4836238640.html

ragin cajun 02-07-2015 12:15 PM

That $25-40,000 range will buy you what you're finding right now. Metal shavings in the oil? That's a major Pandora's box. Rotten wood in aft cabin and head liner joists can be repaired by a DIY. Removing the teak decks and fiberglassing over is a long process that can be done by your hubby. Living on board while doing these projects would be extremely difficult. I would take a guess to take a run down trawler and bring it up to livable conditions would be double your initial price of the boat.
Look at same size trawlers that are in good condition with little to no work needed, take that price and subtract what your fix-r-upper is selling for. Difference is a starting point for repairs. Sorry to be so negative. I would build up that boat buying kitty to at least $80,000.00 and buy a boat in far better condition.

O C Diver 02-07-2015 12:18 PM

Used market is tighter in that area now as Sandy took a lot of boats off the market and into the land fill. I had better luck looking in FL if that's an option for you.

Ted

Gabe n Em 02-07-2015 01:31 PM

We just locked in a 1981 40' mainship (debate-ably a trawler, I know) in the lower end of your price range. She has a couple not insignificant engine issues that the seller is going to take care of and plenty of small projects for us to do. We had been casually looking from NC to ME for over a year. They show up, you just have to be a little patient unfortunately.

We did see a number of options in Florida but they were too far for us...

The best of luck in your search!

katsailing 02-07-2015 01:32 PM

Florida Boats
 
Aren't the boats in Florida generally left out year round in the water?:eek:

Shouldn't boats be taken out at least for a month to let the hull dry out?:confused:

Its for this reason we haven't looked in Florida even though we have looked at listings online.
What do you think?

ranger42c 02-07-2015 01:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by katsailing (Post 305639)
Aren't the boats in Florida generally left out year round in the water?:eek:

Shouldn't boats be taken out at least for a month to let the hull dry out?:confused:


We haul ours for the winter once every 4 years.

Our cats dislike the car ride from house to boat, but once aboard they're generally happy. High speed cruising (and maybe turbo whine) isn't their favorite, but otherwise, they just hunker down (as cats are wont to do) until it's quiet again... and then they're back to normal.

You might hum a few bars about what kind of boating you might be intending to do...

-Chris

katsailing 02-07-2015 01:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ksanders (Post 305584)
Yes, the things you are seeing are normal

AND

No, the things you are seeing are not normal.

Generally the "you get what you pay for" rule applies.

If you look at higher priced boats they will for the most part be in much better condition.

Sometimes you get lucky and find a bargain, but not often.

Beautiful boat! Your MV Lisas Way, a 2001 Bayliner 4788. What a boat! Alaska is way too far for us and too cold, but glad you enjoy it.

Pure pleasure 02-07-2015 01:44 PM

My boat is 34 yrs. Old it's only out of the water to get bottom paint it takes a week and is done ever 2 yrs.

Capt.Bill11 02-07-2015 01:54 PM

Bare in mind diesel are harder on oil then gas engines. The color of the oil is pretty much meaningless, unless it's thick like mud. :D

katsailing 02-07-2015 02:00 PM

Oil
 
What do you think would cause the metal shavings in the oil?:ermm:

Pure pleasure 02-07-2015 02:02 PM

Lots for thing could I had an engine spin a bearing and another ground down a cam both not good or cheap to fix

BandB 02-07-2015 03:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by katsailing (Post 305639)
Aren't the boats in Florida generally left out year round in the water?:eek:

Shouldn't boats be taken out at least for a month to let the hull dry out?:confused:

Its for this reason we haven't looked in Florida even though we have looked at listings online.
What do you think?

Yes they are left in the water. No, nothing is accomplished in a month for drying the hull out. If the hull is water tight, then water isn't hurting anything. If water is seeping through somehow, then a little time out of thewater isn't going to change things. Now, that said, most boats in Florida are periodically hauled for service or paint or whatever. At least every couple of years.

psneeld 02-07-2015 04:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by katsailing (Post 305639)
Aren't the boats in Florida generally left out year round in the water?:eek:

Shouldn't boats be taken out at least for a month to let the hull dry out?:confused:

Its for this reason we haven't looked in Florida even though we have looked at listings online.
What do you think?

Taking a boat out of the water with bottom paint on it and gel coat under won't dry out in a year if saturated.

Boats in colder water that are out of the water for 5 months or so get saturated slower if at all...the good news.

But boats in the mid Atlantic can be hit or miss if left in all year...just luck of the draw and to a point what manufacturer.

Even a boat with a toasted engine can be a good deal if you get it in good condition but 10 to 20 grand below the competition if it is the pick of the litter. A new engine or rebuilt one may be had and installed for the difference in prices.

Under 50 grand is going to limit you to the 36 foot range which is small to live on for many people. If you try for 40 footers and above...expect a real project boat if the engine is currently running.

There are always great deals that happen along...just depends if you wait or happen to be in the right place at the right time.

RT Firefly 02-07-2015 05:59 PM

Greetings,
Mr./Ms kat. You may have to kiss a lot of frogs before you find your prince (ess). The one thing that concerns me is your phrase "...but we need to find something soon..." Finding the "right" boat is not an exercise that should be performed under duress. That, coupled with your budget could easily see you make a bad, bad decision. Buying ANY boat is NOT an investment in any way, shape or form. It's a money losing proposition 98% of the time. Mr. cardude 01's suggestion is well founded. Within your budget and it will get you on the water. Do NOT, NEVER, EVER, NO WAY, NO HOW let emotion enter into a boat buying decision. As mentioned by several of my revered colleagues, take your time and look further afield.
I don't know where you heard a boat has to "dry out" every year but stop listening to that person. Do more homework, slow down, chill, enjoy the chase, relax and mostly...

https://sp.yimg.com/ib/th?id=HN.6079...1&pid=15.1&P=0

cardude01 02-07-2015 06:45 PM

Problems with Trawlers
 
I thought my houseboat/trawler would make a cool Bahamas boat. Couldn't draw much with the jack plate lifted.

Those big engines burn too much fuel, but two Suzuki 60hp "high thrust" 4 strokes should burn about 1-1.5 GPH at about half power each. Looks like maybe 60hp total will get this hull about 9 knots at 2-3 GPH. Not too bad. And quiet. But wait, there's more-- you have redundancy with the dual outboards if one craps out on you!

eyschulman 02-07-2015 06:59 PM

If the OP is still keeping track here is another opinion which may reinforce others. Many boats of all types with live aboard room in your price range are either major fix its or a few steps from the wreckers and it has nothing to do with the Trawler moniker. Good boats are expensive more so boats that are considered live aboard traveling trawlers. On the other hand, here in Seattle where land based digs are very expensive there are plenty of people living on immobile near derelicts or basically cheaper living space on the water. Have you checked out any old Bayliners?

READY2GO 02-07-2015 07:56 PM

Katsailing,

I do not want to discourage you but you get what you pay for. We bought our MT 36' three years ago and paid $20K. Fast forward to today and we have $55K in her (more than we will ever get out of her). But we knew going in that we would have to put alot into her to make her the way we wanted and to equip her for cruising and liveaboard. We were fortunate that we found a boat that was structurally sound and had a good motor but needed cosmetic and new equipment. It worked out well for us as we could not afford a $55K boat, but we could afford $20K and 10K a year to refit.

Concerning your budget, think of it like this. A new MT 37 is about $250K and you have a $20 to 40K budget. If a new Ferrari cost $250K, what condition would one that you bought for $20 to 40K be in?

My $ .02 is look patiently and head to Florida. Boats are cheaper there and if you are patient you will find something that fits, but it won't be a turn key trawler for $40K.

JDCAVE 02-07-2015 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RT Firefly (Post 305690)
Greetings,
Mr./Ms kat. You may have to kiss a lot of frogs before you find your prince (ess). The one thing that concerns me is your phrase "...but we need to find something soon..." Finding the "right" boat is not an exercise that should be performed under duress. That, coupled with your budget could easily see you make a bad, bad decision. Buying ANY boat is NOT an investment in any way, shape or form. It's a money losing proposition 98% of the time. Mr. cardude 01's suggestion is well founded. Within your budget and it will get you on the water. Do NOT, NEVER, EVER, NO WAY, NO HOW let emotion enter into a boat buying decision. As mentioned by several of my revered colleagues, take your time and look further afield.
I don't know where you heard a boat has to "dry out" every year but stop listening to that person. Do more homework, slow down, chill, enjoy the chase, relax and mostly...

https://sp.yimg.com/ib/th?id=HN.6079...1&pid=15.1&P=0


<---What he said!!!!!!!!! We spent more time looking for a boat than when looking for a new house-both houses combined. It took us over two years. Looking back at the process, we were right to walk away from a bunch of boats. And 2 years later we are pleased with the boat we purchased.

Also the OP said: "Black oil left in tanks or metal shavings, we have seen this when pulling the dip stick out to check the oil."

Metal shavings on a dipstick? Hmmm. We did an oil sample analysis when we purchased our boat and they check for metals in the oil, but I'm surprised if metal shavings would come up on the dipstick. If so, run don't walk away. In hindsight the oil analysis should have been done sequentially at time increments after an oil change but I haven't done that since,


Jim
Sent from my iPad using Trawler Forum

dannc 02-07-2015 09:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by katsailing (Post 305578)
Hi Everyone!

We are still searching for a Trawler, spent the last several days in Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey looking at Used Trawlers.

The problems we are finding are as such:
1)Black oil left in tanks or metal shavings, we have seen this when pulling the dip stick out to check the oil.

Black oil? Do you mean the oil in the engine is black?

Engine oil in a diesel will turn black very quickly. Even after an oil change the oil will quickly turn black when mixing with the old oil left in the engine.

Once you find a boat you think you would want to buy, get the oil tested which will tell you if the oil is in bad shape but also can indicate if there are metal particles and where the metal is from in the engine.

I have used Blackstone for years, Blackstone Labs. They will send you sample kits for free when you need to test some oil.

Good Luck,
Dan

kulas44 02-07-2015 09:34 PM

From what you have posted I would say that you need to LEARN a lot more about boats, and trawlers in general before putting down your money.

cardude01 02-07-2015 09:36 PM

I agree. I'm the most impatient person I know, and it took me two years to pull the trigger.

tego 02-07-2015 09:42 PM

Katsailing, I believe the hunting is much better in Florida. I lived there and worked in the marine trades for several years. There are always some very good boats there for a good price. Retirees usually head for the warmer climes and a lot of them leave this world there. The kids just tell the broker to "sell the boat and send me the money". The brokers ask the going price but are very receptive to ANY offers, 'cause the kids are on their tails daily. You can make a low offer and insist the broker present it to the absentee owners. I had a good friend who was a broker and he told me tales of some hiway robbery episodes. It's true that the sun is tough on the brightwork in FL but that's easy to make right, and a good compounding of the 'glass can usually make things much better also. Don't be afraid of Florida boats but BE PATIENT! Your boat will find you! Good luck, Ben

ksanders 02-08-2015 01:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eyschulman (Post 305702)
Have you checked out any old Bayliners?

Good call...

Often a 1980's Bayliner 38' can be purchased pretty inexpensivly, and they have relativly few problems, (although any boat of that vintage can be problematic if not maintained).

And, that particular boat can and has cruised the Bahamas, the Caribbean and into Central America.

Read the "diamond Lil" series of books, which are an excerpt of Melanie Woods adventures on her 38' Bayliner.

BandB 02-08-2015 02:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ksanders (Post 305825)
Read the "diamond Lil" series of books, which are an excerpt of Melanie Woods adventures on her 38' Bayliner.

And very enjoyable reading.

FF 02-08-2015 05:58 AM

Look at the Gulfstar and other US brands.

Usually no buried house ply , solid GRP hull and decks and deck house.

$25K to $40 K will get a fine boat in the 35 -40 ft size.

ANYTHING can be repaired , but time and cost may be excessive.

Go solid , go simple , go now!

Autoteacher 02-08-2015 08:42 AM

We looked at over 50 trawlers before we found a 40 ft sundeck that we could afford that was not total junk. Many adverts with pictures are deceiving. Many brokers told us what they wanted us to hear. After 40+years in the car business I thought I could spot the lies but some were very slick. Hire a good surveyor! There are bargains out there. Our friends looked for a year before buying a $85000. older trawler to replace their Grand Banks that was too small for them. We only had a small kitty to work with and found owners that would work with us. We have a lot of sweat equity now but enjoy a paid for boat full time. If you can't do your own work (Electrical, wood, light mechanical) you will be upside down very fast. Good advisement here on this forum!

ranger42c 02-08-2015 09:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tego (Post 305770)
Katsailing, I believe the hunting is much better in Florida. I lived there and worked in the marine trades for several years. There are always some very good boats there for a good price.

It's true that the sun is tough on the brightwork in FL but that's easy to make right, and a good compounding of the 'glass can usually make things much better also. Don't be afraid of Florida boats but BE PATIENT! Your boat will find you! Good luck, Ben


And shopping on boats with little to no brightwork in the first place an sometimes at least partially mitigate that, too.

-Chris

psneeld 02-08-2015 09:26 AM

Trawlers from Florida that have been in the water all year need a very good look at their hulls underwater.

2 of my liveaboards from Florida either had or developed blisters....the one I have now required cost prohibitive bottom repair had I not done it myself. The surveyor missed a tad of issues and I foolishly missed the haulout.

The topsides are small potatoes in many respects...depending on your fit and finish requirements.

Wxx3 02-08-2015 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ragin cajun (Post 305601)
That $25-40,000 range will buy you what you're finding right now. Metal shavings in the oil? That's a major Pandora's box. Rotten wood in aft cabin and head liner joists can be repaired by a DIY. Removing the teak decks and fiberglassing over is a long process that can be done by your hubby. Living on board while doing these projects would be extremely difficult. I would take a guess to take a run down trawler and bring it up to livable conditions would be double your initial price of the boat.
Look at same size trawlers that are in good condition with little to no work needed, take that price and subtract what your fix-r-upper is selling for. Difference is a starting point for repairs. Sorry to be so negative. I would build up that boat buying kitty to at least $80,000.00 and buy a boat in far better condition.

TheI think this is excellent advice.

A few things to add:

You can't be in a hurry and find the right boat. Bargains are out there, but if so easy to find, they'd be gone already.

Look at boats double your price range. How can you know if a $40k is worth it, if you haven't seen some at $60, 80k and $20k too.

That's another reason it's a long process.

Find some body you know that knows boats. TF is great, but to every question, there are many answers and I think at your stage, that's not helpful.

E.g. to have to ask about metal shavings in oil twice, is wasting your time.

Boats in the water year around are no better, no worse than boats out of the water.. In fact, out of water can mean many things, not all of them good.

On your budget, Florida is even more attractive since there are so many boats, you are more likely to find what you want st a price you can afford.

We looked at many boats before we bought. Many I knew we had no interest in, but it's important to know what's out there.

Good luck.
I hope this helped.
I wish I could have cats, but...

sunchaser 02-08-2015 10:34 AM

Katsailing

What do you want to do 75% of the time with the vessel you acquire?

Art 02-08-2015 10:38 AM

Katsailing - Get a purchase broker on your side.

Let the broker recommend boats to you. Be sure to provide the broker a typed list of ALL your needs, use plans, and budget for your boat. Begin to read-up on all info you can find about pleasure boats... internet is great for doing this, library books can be good too. Seems you are not well versed in pleasure power crafts so your learning curve will be nearly vertical at least for some time.

Good Luck - and - Ask Questions Here! There are those who can provide answers. :thumb:

Happy Boat-Search Daze! - Art :speed boat:

katsailing 02-08-2015 11:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RT Firefly (Post 305690)
Greetings,
Mr./Ms kat. You may have to kiss a lot of frogs before you find your prince (ess). The one thing that concerns me is your phrase "...but we need to find something soon..." Finding the "right" boat is not an exercise that should be performed under duress. That, coupled with your budget could easily see you make a bad, bad decision. Buying ANY boat is NOT an investment in any way, shape or form. It's a money losing proposition 98% of the time. Mr. cardude 01's suggestion is well founded. Within your budget and it will get you on the water. Do NOT, NEVER, EVER, NO WAY, NO HOW let emotion enter into a boat buying decision. As mentioned by several of my revered colleagues, take your time and look further afield.
I don't know where you heard a boat has to "dry out" every year but stop listening to that person. Do more homework, slow down, chill, enjoy the chase, relax and mostly...

https://sp.yimg.com/ib/th?id=HN.6079...1&pid=15.1&P=0

Don't worry, we aren't jumping at the very first boat we see. My husband has been searching and researching information since last summer. It wasn't until recently in the last month we saw more Trawlers in our price range. Most of the urgency came about in the last 2 months. You see we would like to sell our home get out from under this load and live aboard a boat and travel instead of being stuck here in Pennsylvania with 9-5 Jobs and nothing to do but pay bills, come home and sit on the couch watch movies, do gardening and just generally feel like life is passing us by.

katsailing 02-08-2015 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wxx3 (Post 305885)
TheI think this is excellent advice.

A few things to add:

You can't be in a hurry and find the right boat. Bargains are out there, but if so easy to find, they'd be gone already.

Look at boats double your price range. How can you know if a $40k is worth it, if you haven't seen some at $60, 80k and $20k too.

That's another reason it's a long process.

Find some body you know that knows boats. TF is great, but to every question, there are many answers and I think at your stage, that's not helpful.

E.g. to have to ask about metal shavings in oil twice, is wasting your time.

Boats in the water year around are no better, no worse than boats out of the water.. In fact, out of water can mean many things, not all of them good.

On your budget, Florida is even more attractive since there are so many boats, you are more likely to find what you want st a price you can afford.

We looked at many boats before we bought. Many I knew we had no interest in, but it's important to know what's out there.

Good luck.
I hope this helped.
I wish I could have cats, but...

Thanks Wxx3, you made some very good points. My husband does have a friend he keeps in contact with that has his Captain's license and has chartered boats before. He runs a lot of the information about the boats we have looked at by him. My husband does have some sailing knowledge, I am very much the newbie or novice. He is a quick learner and knows what to look for on the boats right down to the damage that may cause a problem for us down the road. I have been mostly brushing up on sailing terminology as much as I can. We have found something to put a bid on when we were in New Jersey, hopefully this will be the one. Wish us luck, ok?

katsailing 02-08-2015 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 305870)
Trawlers from Florida that have been in the water all year need a very good look at their hulls underwater.

2 of my liveaboards from Florida either had or developed blisters....the one I have now required cost prohibitive bottom repair had I not done it myself. The surveyor missed a tad of issues and I foolishly missed the haulout.

The topsides are small potatoes in many respects...depending on your fit and finish requirements.

Thanks for your input psneeld that was what we were hearing a lot of with the Florida boats. Besides it is too far for us to travel to look at boats, that would put our budget through the roof not to mention we would need a place to stay while browsing. We are sticking to the New Jersey, Maryland and possibly Virginia & North Carolina areas. The last to states being last, very last on our list.

Codger2 02-08-2015 11:30 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by katsailing (Post 305893)
....... instead of being stuck here in Pennsylvania with 9-5 Jobs and nothing to do but pay bills, come home and sit on the couch watch movies, do gardening and just generally feel like life is passing us by.

GEEZ! What's wrong with that? (I guess the grass is really greener out side of Pennsylvania!)

katsailing 02-08-2015 12:51 PM

Rudder Problems and Maintenance
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hello Everyone,

In our searching for a Trawler we came across this on the boats rudder shoe:
Picture files attached.
We are looking to buy the boat on which this rudder shoe is attached, how concerned should we be about the extent of the repair work needed on this rudder shoe. :banghead:Does anyone know how this is made and what is possibly inside? Any information would be appreciated and thanks!

katsailing 02-08-2015 12:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Codger2 (Post 305901)
GEEZ! What's wrong with that? (I guess the grass is really greener out side of Pennsylvania!)

No Codger2, not greener just dull. My husband longs to be on the water and I want to be right by his side.

BandB 02-08-2015 12:57 PM

I'm feeling a little disconnect here and have some concern. You speak of working 9 to 5 and house payments but then your price limit on the boat is $25-40,000 and looking at boats in Florida would put your budget through the roof. Meanwhile your goal it to get the boat and travel. I'm a bit concerned for two aspects. First, have you included the time and costs of getting the boat ready for travel? Second, how have you budgeted the costs of living aboard and traveling and not having the 9 to 5 job? The costs only start with the initial purchase. Living gets less expensive only if you don't go anywhere and even then there are the basic marina costs and general maintenance. Have you sat down with someone experienced and budgeted for cruising? Just because the engines survey well initially doesn't mean they will remain that way and one major expense could be devastating. Hopefully you have it all worked out with information we don't have and that's fine if you do. I was just concerned based on what you've shared.

katsailing 02-08-2015 12:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sunchaser (Post 305887)
Katsailing

What do you want to do 75% of the time with the vessel you acquire?

Well sunchaser eat and sleep and the other 25% take the boat out. Would be nice if we could take our house out, but we can't find a balloon big enough to lift it.:)

katsailing 02-08-2015 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 305929)
I'm feeling a little disconnect here and have some concern. You speak of working 9 to 5 and house payments but then your price limit on the boat is $25-40,000 and looking at boats in Florida would put your budget through the roof. Meanwhile your goal it to get the boat and travel. I'm a bit concerned for two aspects. First, have you included the time and costs of getting the boat ready for travel? Second, how have you budgeted the costs of living aboard and traveling and not having the 9 to 5 job? The costs only start with the initial purchase. Living gets less expensive only if you don't go anywhere and even then there are the basic marina costs and general maintenance. Have you sat down with someone experienced and budgeted for cruising? Just because the engines survey well initially doesn't mean they will remain that way and one major expense could be devastating. Hopefully you have it all worked out with information we don't have and that's fine if you do. I was just concerned based on what you've shared.

Thanks for your concern BandB, we have take a lot of the expenses into account and run figures by each other and a friend of my husband's who has a captain's license and has quite a bit of knowledge when it comes to boating and boats.

RT Firefly 02-08-2015 01:03 PM

Greetings,
Mr. k. Make/brand of vessel? This will have a bearing (no pun intended...OK, sort of a pun intended-lower rudder bearing....) on how it is constructed. Could be very straightforward and cheap OR complicated and $$$$$.

JDCAVE 02-08-2015 01:18 PM

Problems with Trawlers
 
Katsailing. WRT the rudder shoe. Hard to tell from the photo. Get an honest shipwright to get an estimate. Also, with all boats of this age, check the through hulls. By example I looked at a KK42 on the hard with a broker and a shipwright...the SW found a through-hull of concern and the broker questioned the interpretation. SW told the broker to put his finger in and feel the pitting. These sorts of things should be routinely examined when on the hard.


Jim
Sent from my iPad using Trawler Forum

Art 02-08-2015 01:45 PM

Per chance... Is there a Galaxy-Girl in the room... just asking! - LOL :hide:

katsailing 02-08-2015 01:51 PM

No Art sorry not a Galaxy-Girl! LOL right back. :)

katsailing 02-08-2015 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RT Firefly (Post 305933)
Greetings,
Mr. k. Make/brand of vessel? This will have a bearing (no pun intended...OK, sort of a pun intended-lower rudder bearing....) on how it is constructed. Could be very straightforward and cheap OR complicated and $$$$$.

Ok RT Firefly, It is a Marine Trader 38.

katsailing 02-08-2015 01:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JDCAVE (Post 305940)
Katsailing. WRT the rudder shoe. Hard to tell from the photo. Get an honest shipwright to get an estimate. Also, with all boats of this age, check the through hulls. By example I looked at a KK42 on the hard with a broker and a shipwright...the SW found a through-hull of concern and the broker questioned the interpretation. SW told the broker to put his finger in and feel the pitting. These sorts of things should be routinely examined when on the hard.


Jim
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Hi JDCave, we were looking at the boat on the hard. It actually has been on the hard about 8 years. Does that make a difference? Also it is a 1995.


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