New gent looking at trawlers to retire in....

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Ahhh - That brings up... One of the leading best items re our Tolly's exterior maintenance needs... virtually no wood to keep finished. Actually, there are only two strips of 1" x 3" x 36" tall wood to the forward side of each of the 1/2 high midship slider doors. Tolly life is EZ!!

LOL Art. I have you beat. The American Tug has NO, NONE, NADA, ZILCH external teak.
HA HA HA :D :dance: :D
 
LOL Art. I have you beat. The American Tug has NO, NONE, NADA, ZILCH external teak.
HA HA HA :D :dance: :D

Damn! You your boat gets the gold and our Tolly's relinquished to the silver.

But Wait!!! - You mention external teak. We have non either... I think. MOF - I'm not really sure what 1" x 3" x 36" wood it is that's one piece on each of the 1/2 high slider doors... cause it's always been painted white!
 
Damn! You your boat gets the gold and our Tolly's relinquished to the silver.

But Wait!!! - You mention external teak. We have non either... I think. MOF - I'm not really sure what 1" x 3" x 36" wood it is that's one piece on each of the 1/2 high slider doors... cause it's always been painted white!

Ah if it isn't starboard it is still teak. Admit it, you now hold 2nd place. :D
 
Ah if it isn't starboard it is still teak. Admit it, you now hold 2nd place. :D

Could be mahogany?? OK... still wood. No problem, 2nd place is fine for this instance.
 
When you do get your boat, spend a few days, preferably with an experienced boat handler, docking and undocking. Not just your home dock, but city docks, fuel docks and so on. For awhile, every time you operate your boat include some docking practice.
Before you solo, practice several times with someone else aboard standing by.
My first boat was 65', bought on an online auction without my parents permission, I was 13. The money was earned. I come from a maritime family and received many hours of hands on instruction before I was allowed to operate on my own. But it made me a great boat handler. Boat was wood with twin Detroits, 20' shorter, but not unlike my current boat. I began my boating life with Detroits and will probably finish out with Detroits. It's been a great life with the most reliable, long running engines.
 
When you do get your boat, spend a few days, preferably with an experienced boat handler, docking and undocking. Not just your home dock, but city docks, fuel docks and so on. For awhile, every time you operate your boat include some docking practice.
Before you solo, practice several times with someone else aboard standing by.
My first boat was 65', bought on an online auction without my parents permission, I was 13. The money was earned. I come from a maritime family and received many hours of hands on instruction before I was allowed to operate on my own. But it made me a great boat handler. Boat was wood with twin Detroits, 20' shorter, but not unlike my current boat. I began my boating life with Detroits and will probably finish out with Detroits. It's been a great life with the most reliable, long running engines.

Congratulations!! - 13 yr old buys 65' twin screw diesel boat... Simply Priceless!!

Gotta ask though - "... an online auction..." ??
 
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Wood belongs in the interior.
 

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I would be happy to share our experiences with teak care and boat maintenance. Let me know when you can schedule a visit.
 
Many of the people saying they single hand larger boats probably have a lot of experience. If you are just getting started it may be factor. However I'd first look at what size fits your needs in terms of how long you'll be aboard, what areas you plan to visit, and what can you afford to maintain. Buying a boat is one thing, maintaining it is another. I have a 21' Wellcraft I use on Lake Tahoe and a 40' Tollycraft in the PNW. The maintenance of the Tollycraft isn't twice the Wellcraft, it's 100x.

Anyway it sounds like you're narrowing in on a range. It is easy to get caught up in the bigger is better mentality. Bigger is great if you're on it for long periods (months) but there's much more work as well. So, identify what you really need and focus on that. As to handling, hire a captain for a few days to help you learn the ropes. Frankly any new boat has learning curve, big or small.
 
I would be happy to share our experiences with teak care and boat maintenance. Let me know when you can schedule a visit.

I am in VA but we are getting close to steelhead fishing season in the Lake Erie Tributaries, so I go by Pittsburg often, I may take you up on your generous offer.

Thank you
 
Buying a boat is one thing, maintaining it is another. I have a 21' Wellcraft I use on Lake Tahoe and a 40' Tollycraft in the PNW. The maintenance of the Tollycraft isn't twice the Wellcraft, it's 100x.

This I am giving a lot of thought. Right now I am not retired and gladly pay to have things done I could do if I had the time or desire. I recently paid detailer to wash/wax our 21' fiberglass RV. I could have easily done it but honestly, I still work and am really protective of my free time, especially in blocks of 4-5 hours.

I am quite handy and like projects, but big question is once retired do I want to maintain boat myself or just write checks...this answer very well may help determine max length of boat. However, with trawler I am thinking projects while under way may help pass the time.
 
Just some perspective. I thought I'd have a load more time when I retired. The reality wasn't quite that way, so I still end up paying people to do things. I try to stay with non-time critical items and let the pros manage bigger things.
 
The Ocean Alexander 39-46 series might work. Semi-displacement Ed Monk designed hulls are spacious and flexible...fairly fuel efficiency in the hull speed + range, but capable of a burst of speed when the need arises. Sort of a crossover with traditional trawler underpinnings and a more modern deckhouse design. Typically equipped with a pair of small diesels. Little or no outside teak. Spectacular interior joinery. The 42, 44, 46 have an aft cockpit. The sundeck adds outside space that greatly expands the livability factor. The OA sedans are also well built boats.

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The Ocean Alexander 39-46 series might work. Semi-displacement Ed Monk designed hulls are spacious and flexible...fairly fuel efficiency in the hull speed + range, but capable of a burst of speed when the need arises. Sort of a crossover with traditional trawler underpinnings and a more modern deckhouse design. Typically equipped with a pair of small diesels. Little or no outside teak. Spectacular interior joinery. The 42, 44, 46 have an aft cockpit. The sundeck adds outside space that greatly expands the livability factor. The OA sedans are also well built boats.

Thanks, these look really nice and tick a bunch of boxes, Yacht World seems to have quite the selection and prices seem reasonable at first glance. I'll look into further.
 
.....I should have said operationally flexible. The construction is very robust. I reset a thru hull a few years ago and the bottom was about 1" thick at midships....no coring.
 
I am quite handy and like projects, but big question is once retired do I want to maintain boat myself or just write checks...this answer very well may help determine max length of boat. However, with trawler I am thinking projects while under way may help pass the time.

IMO being handy is quite important. Even if you can afford to write checks often times it is not as easy as that. Depending on your location, Marine Trades might be hard to find or unavailable when you need them. Lead times can be weeks or months which can keep you off the water just when you want to be out fishing.

If you have access to a good mechanic that is experienced with your engine; a good electrician who will point out and fix prior botched jobs as he is working on your new project; and a plumber that does not mind being on call to troubleshoot a non-functioning head - then you are probably captaining a superyacht with a crew of at least 5!

Most maintenance on a boat of your planned size is well within the ability of a handy person with the right tools and, where needed, access to youtube. Heck you might even get to enjoy it.
 
IMO being handy is quite important. Even if you can afford to write checks often times it is not as easy as that. Depending on your location, Marine Trades might be hard to find or unavailable when you need them. Lead times can be weeks or months which can keep you off the water just when you want to be out fishing.


This is so true. I would have gladly paid a small fortune to have someone troubleshoot and fix my depth sounder issue. Not possible.

I did find a vendor that was willing to test my DSM if I brought it too him. He also loaned me a transducer to test the DSM and system in situ. It was a 45 minute drive from my house to his shop each time. Yes, I paid him for an hours shop time to test the DSM, but I didn’t pay for the loaner test transducer. I also didn’t pay him for his experience and advice. When I determined, with his advice, that I needed a new thru-hull transducer I decided to purchase it from him rather than order it online for much less.

I was able to pay a yard to haul the boat and install the new transducer, but I wasn’t able to pay someone to run the cable from the transducer to the DSM in the pilothouse. I would have paid a LOT.

So writing a check is a good plan if you can do it. Sometimes you can’t so you are left with having to do it yourself or watch precious boating time pass you by.
 

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