Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-05-2020, 11:14 PM   #1
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,168
How to Dock a Boat Correctly

I came across this little video. Might help someone out there in TF land.


https://youtu.be/Mx0LEAWsE_k
__________________
Advertisement

Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 03:59 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
BrianG's Avatar
 
City: Santa Barbara
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 276
I have a single screw boat. No thruster. I'm not that good at docking but think I'd be better if I had any of the setups in the vid. Here is my limited little bag of tricks that help me with a single screw:
1) Go slow
2) Steering a boat steers the stern, not the bow
3) Reverse is a brake
4) Have a game plan for getting in and out of a slip. share it with crew before you're at the slip
5) Get people on the dock to help.
6) Don't singlehand. This rule is even more crucial once you're underway
7) If you get all messed up don't panic, go to NEUTRAL. Reassess. people will normally help and you can always use your hands to push off of other docked boats
__________________

BrianG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 07:43 AM   #3
Guru
 
oscar's Avatar
 
City: Bethlehem, PA
Vessel Name: Lady Kay V
Vessel Model: 1978 Hatteras 53MY
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 899
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianG View Post
I have a single screw boat. No thruster. I'm not that good at docking but think I'd be better if I had any of the setups in the vid. Here is my limited little bag of tricks that help me with a single screw:
1) Go slow
2) Steering a boat steers the stern, not the bow
3) Reverse is a brake
4) Have a game plan for getting in and out of a slip. share it with crew before you're at the slip
5) Get people on the dock to help.
6) Don't singlehand. This rule is even more crucial once you're underway
7) If you get all messed up don't panic, go to NEUTRAL. Reassess. people will normally help and you can always use your hands to push off of other docked boats
I suggest you research and understand the concept of "Prop Walk". It is an essential tool in single screw boat handling.
__________________
Experience is a cruel teacher.... first it gives the test. Then it gives the lesson.
oscar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 08:34 AM   #4
Guru
 
ScottC's Avatar
 
City: Malmö
Vessel Name: ABsolutely FABulous
Vessel Model: Greenline 33 Hybrid (2010)
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 648
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaskan Sea-Duction View Post
I came across this little video. Might help someone out there in TF land.
https://youtu.be/Mx0LEAWsE_k

Docking with twins is nice. But, wow - docking with triples & quads - something I never thought about before this video. Most likely will not think about it again. Nevertheless, this was interesting. Thnx for sharing.
__________________
Scott
2010 Greenline 33' Hybrid
Home port: Malmö, SWEDEN
Currently in: Gruissan, FRANCE
ScottC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 08:49 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
timb's Avatar
 
City: Oriental N.C.
Vessel Name: true heading
Vessel Model: marine trader 38 dc
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 467
I'm definitely not great at docking .but if I tried to back my single in and swing the bow up wind like in the first example it would end horribly. I have to do the opposite.
timb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 09:27 AM   #6
Member
 
City: Grand Haven
Vessel Name: Feath (fee-a) Gaelic for Calm, Tranquil
Vessel Model: 1989 Jefferson 37 Sundeck
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 5
How to dock a boat Correctly

I always try to bring my boat into my slip putting the bow into the wind, rather than being forced further along by both the wind and the boats movement. I have a twin screw, no bow thruster Jefferson 37 that I brought from New Jersey back to Lake Michigan in 2016. Each year I get better at handling and docking the boat but my mantra is: " I may be getting better but I don't get cocky.". Just about the time that I do that is when I will be eating a huge dose of 'humble pie'.
LenBuchanan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 10:52 AM   #7
Veteran Member
 
City: Port Hope
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 64
Aren't there a lot of differences in docking techniques for inboard vs outboard engines? It would seem that having the ability to turn the propellers in the direction you need would offer much better maneuverability than simply directing water flow past the rudders.
John R M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 10:58 AM   #8
Guru
 
Seevee's Avatar
 
City: st pete
Vessel Model: 400 Mainship
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 2,571
Quote:
Originally Posted by timb View Post
I'm definitely not great at docking .but if I tried to back my single in and swing the bow up wind like in the first example it would end horribly. I have to do the opposite.

Timb,


Totally agree. To get a single to swing the bow against any sort of wind is wishful thinking, even with a thruster. Backing into the wind is great for station keeping, but to swing a turn into a slip.... ain't gonna work.



I do just the opposite, like you bow into the wind and try to get a line on before the bow swings down wind. Once you "loose" the bow might as well start over (which I've done many times).


However, backing a single (thrusters or not) with a lot of wind is challenging into itself. Heck, backing a twin with windvhas issues, too.
__________________
Seevee
Seevee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 11:01 AM   #9
Guru
 
City: Rochester, NY
Vessel Name: Hour Glass
Vessel Model: Chris Craft Catalina 381
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 2,343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
Totally agree. To get a single to swing the bow against any sort of wind is wishful thinking, even with a thruster. Backing into the wind is great for station keeping, but to swing a turn into a slip.... ain't gonna work.
You can kick the bow up wind pretty well if you're backing down, then apply a fistful of forward thrust and full rudder. Works with a single or twin. However, it's not all that useful for getting into a slip, as it sucks up some space to do it. Usually takes less space than powering forward and trying to turn upwind though.
rslifkin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 11:06 AM   #10
Guru
 
Seevee's Avatar
 
City: st pete
Vessel Model: 400 Mainship
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 2,571
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianG View Post
I have a single screw boat. No thruster. I'm not that good at docking but think I'd be better if I had any of the setups in the vid. Here is my limited little bag of tricks that help me with a single screw:
1) Go slow
2) Steering a boat steers the stern, not the bow
3) Reverse is a brake
4) Have a game plan for getting in and out of a slip. share it with crew before you're at the slip
5) Get people on the dock to help.
6) Don't singlehand. This rule is even more crucial once you're underway
7) If you get all messed up don't panic, go to NEUTRAL. Reassess. people will normally help and you can always use your hands to push off of other docked boats

Brian,


Good points, but take exception to the singlehand. MANY of us do that on a daily basis, without issue. Just went out the other night, used the wind to my advantage docking and thanked the folks that wanted to help but said I'll do it myself. However, once I get my spring line on, boat in forward, it will pin to the dock and I'll except help from others. I often get greeted by some rather attractive ladies when I dock and like that, so let them run a line to a piling. And occasionally find one that knows what they're doing. Gotta have some fun.



Also, I could argue, overall, NOT to use dock hands, as they will often mess up your plan, until you have at least one spring line on and are secure.



And, I could argue to NEVER EVER put your hands out there to push off. Just hold a fender in place. My strict policy is no hands, legs or any part of the body leaves the boat unless it's securely tied to the dock, and I brief that one strongly.
__________________
Seevee
Seevee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 11:24 AM   #11
Guru
 
Moonfish's Avatar


 
City: Port Townsend, WA
Vessel Name: Traveler
Vessel Model: Cheoy Lee 46 LRC
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,161
Brian's list is a good start. I would add:

1) Go slow

Agreed, though you need enough way to properly engage the rudder(s). One of my favorite boating adages is "always approach the dock at the speed you wish to hit it"!

2) Steering a boat steers the stern, not the bow

Not a lot of boaters actually know this! It's also the reason why we depart the dock in reverse 95% of the time, as I don't want our swim step hitting the dock.

3) Reverse is a brake

Yes, and correctly using prop walk in reverse can be just like having a stern thruster.

4) Have a game plan for getting in and out of a slip. share it with crew before you're at the slip

We always discuss the order of events (lines) with crew in advance.

5) Get people on the dock to help.

If there's help we never turn it down, even if we're docking in completely calm conditions. We also always offer to help boats docking when we're on the dock.

6) Don't singlehand. This rule is even more crucial once you're underway

Sometimes singlehanding is necessary. Having a thorough understanding of how your boat handles is paramount. The previous tip (#5) is also VERY helpful, to the point it's a good idea to call the marina in advance and let them know you would like assistance as you are coming in singlehanded.

7) If you get all messed up don't panic, go to NEUTRAL. Reassess. people will normally help and you can always use your hands to push off of other docked boats

Agree completely with the first sentence. There have been a few times where wind/current have caused me to get momentarily "confused". Just dropping into neutral for a second or two allows the brain to temporarily reset and jump back into action. With enough way, neutral is also a tool that allows the boat's momentum to do some work for you.

As far as the last sentence is concerned, I know we all do it instinctively. However, we always get a boat hook and extra fender at the ready if it looks like we're going to need to fend off.
__________________
Darren
Port Townsend, WA
m/v Traveler - '79 Cheoy Lee 46 LRC
https://www.pacificnwboatertested.com
Moonfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 11:39 AM   #12
Guru
 
City: Rochester, NY
Vessel Name: Hour Glass
Vessel Model: Chris Craft Catalina 381
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 2,343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonfish View Post
2) Steering a boat steers the stern, not the bow

Not a lot of boaters actually know this! It's also the reason why we depart the dock in reverse 95% of the time, as I don't want our swim step hitting the dock.
I've gotten some very funny looks when departing a dock backwards. No thrusters on my boat, so depending on what the wind is doing, it's usually hard to swing the bow out far enough to not hit the swim platform when coming off a face dock. So I typically back off and just keep the bow a couple feet off the dock as I pivot. I've gotten some downright panicked looks and people running to push the bow off when I've backed off and done a 180 (with the bow almost on the dock the whole time) to get moving in the desired direction. People seem to think that having the bow that close to the dock means I'm going to ram it.
rslifkin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 11:42 AM   #13
Guru
 
ancora's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,775
How about using the "H" maneuver for twin screw boats? That's a game saver for me when single handing.
ancora is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 11:58 AM   #14
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 14,604
Greetings,
Mr. BG. STRONGLY disagree with using hands for fending off. To repeat Mr. S's comment..."NEVER, NEVER..." And I will add, NEVER!!!
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 12:01 PM   #15
Guru
 
boathealer's Avatar
 
City: Out Cruisin'
Vessel Name: SCOUT
Vessel Model: Great Harbour N37
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 1,073
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Greetings,
Mr. BG. STRONGLY disagree with using hands for fending off. To repeat Mr. S's comment..."NEVER, NEVER..." And I will add, NEVER!!!
I always tell my crew, "They call it a RUB rail for a reason!"
__________________
--
Ray
m/v SCOUT Web Site
m/v SCOUT Projects Page
boathealer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 12:17 PM   #16
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 6,330
any docking that does not sink your boat nor damage those boats around you, is good.
Remember, neutral is a gear, use it. Gives you time to figure out what your boat is doing (drifting) and then, how to correct it, if necessary.
Never be afraid to start over.
Learn which direction the stern of your boat wants to back when the rudder is centered. (prop walk) Watch the bow too.
Practice 'back and fill'. There are many videos on YouTube.
Never be afraid to start over.
Above all, dont let those around you or on the dock, see you sweat. CHUCKLE
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 01:58 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
BrianG's Avatar
 
City: Santa Barbara
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by oscar View Post
I suggest you research and understand the concept of "Prop Walk". It is an essential tool in single screw boat handling.
I know what it is. That is one of the things that makes backing a single screw difficult. It's not easy to steer no matter. Most common way I utilize prop walk is docking with starboard against the dock, my boat docks to port so I can normally easily clear the dock in reverse then just straighten out and get out of everyone's way. But trying to back out of a 200 yard channel? I'm sure the commercial guys could do it blindfolded. I'd blow it and would just rather not put myself in a culdesac unless I had to.
BrianG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 02:04 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
BrianG's Avatar
 
City: Santa Barbara
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
Brian,


Good points, but take exception to the singlehand. MANY of us do that on a daily basis, without issue. Just went out the other night, used the wind to my advantage docking and thanked the folks that wanted to help but said I'll do it myself. However, once I get my spring line on, boat in forward, it will pin to the dock and I'll except help from others. I often get greeted by some rather attractive ladies when I dock and like that, so let them run a line to a piling. And occasionally find one that knows what they're doing. Gotta have some fun.



Also, I could argue, overall, NOT to use dock hands, as they will often mess up your plan, until you have at least one spring line on and are secure.



And, I could argue to NEVER EVER put your hands out there to push off. Just hold a fender in place. My strict policy is no hands, legs or any part of the body leaves the boat unless it's securely tied to the dock, and I brief that one strongly.
Fundamentally, If I am surfing, diving, boating, or swimming in the ocean, I go with some semblance of a buddy system. "Ocean" being the keyword.
YMMV.
BrianG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 02:11 PM   #19
Guru
 
Soo-Valley's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Islands
Vessel Name: Soo Valley
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 1,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by John R M View Post
Aren't there a lot of differences in docking techniques for inboard vs outboard engines? It would seem that having the ability to turn the propellers in the direction you need would offer much better maneuverability than simply directing water flow past the rudders.
Yes there is. Turning prop in direction does speed up process.
__________________
SteveK
You only need one working engine.
That is why I have two.
Soo-Valley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2020, 02:15 PM   #20
Guru
 
Soo-Valley's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Islands
Vessel Name: Soo Valley
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 1,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
Brian,


Good points, but take exception to the singlehand. MANY of us do that on a daily basis, without issue. Just went out the other night, used the wind to my advantage docking and thanked the folks that wanted to help but said I'll do it myself. However, once I get my spring line on, boat in forward, it will pin to the dock and I'll except help from others. I often get greeted by some rather attractive ladies when I dock and like that, so let them run a line to a piling. And occasionally find one that knows what they're doing. Gotta have some fun.



Also, I could argue, overall, NOT to use dock hands, as they will often mess up your plan, until you have at least one spring line on and are secure.



And, I could argue to NEVER EVER put your hands out there to push off. Just hold a fender in place. My strict policy is no hands, legs or any part of the body leaves the boat unless it's securely tied to the dock, and I brief that one strongly.
Totally agree no help please until you ask by handing over a line, unless you know the person will not redirect the boat. When help arrives late I usually hear oh you don't need any.
__________________

__________________
SteveK
You only need one working engine.
That is why I have two.
Soo-Valley is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×