Trawler Forum

Trawler Forum (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/)
-   Welcome Mat (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s53/)
-   -   Planning way ahead (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s53/planning-way-ahead-58929.html)

Trainerdude 07-17-2021 07:36 AM

Planning way ahead
 
Hello,

New here. Just turned 50 and the wife and I are beginning to plan ahead for retirement. We are committed to doing the great loop, so I am beginning my research on what boat will make that journey with us. Currently spend summers in a 23’ travel trailer in a park, so I don’t know how big of a boat we will need.

Look forward to researching all I can and eventually make the plunge into our new boat…..preferably when the prices drop again….I realize the pandemic has inflated prices, so I am glad that when we go to buy, things should be a little more reasonable.

Dave

trihartsfield 07-17-2021 07:53 AM

Welcome and good luck with your hunt for a boat. You will find a wealth of information here.

Trainerdude 07-17-2021 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trihartsfield (Post 1021379)
Welcome and good luck with your hunt for a boat. You will find a wealth of information here.

Thank you! I have already been reading for a few days and I know I have come to the right place. So many questions, but I am searching for the answers here as I am sure they all have been asked. 😊

firehoser75 07-17-2021 12:39 PM

Welcome to the Forum!!!
Start with "Boat Search 101" at the top of the "General" forum.
Good luck.

OldDan1943 07-17-2021 02:04 PM

Well, your mission is to complete the loop. That's a start. I'd suggest a mid 30ft to mid 40ft length boat. Will you be happy traveling at 5 mph (trawler hull) or do you want to go faster (semi-displacement)

What else?

Trainerdude 07-18-2021 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OldDan1943 (Post 1021465)
Well, your mission is to complete the loop. That's a start. I'd suggest a mid 30ft to mid 40ft length boat. Will you be happy traveling at 5 mph (trawler hull) or do you want to go faster (semi-displacement)

What else?

Yep, will be in no rush to go anywhere. Really want to take our time and enjoy the trip,m. Currently we have a 23ft RV we weekend in and although it’s small, it suits us fine. But I currently have no boating experience, so I am unsure if buying a starter boat to learn on would be best, then buy the loop boat closet to the trip when we know what we truely need and have some experience.

Trainerdude 07-18-2021 07:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by firehoser75 (Post 1021447)
Welcome to the Forum!!!
Start with "Boat Search 101" at the top of the "General" forum.
Good luck.

Read all 12 pages! Sure is a lot of views and lots of great advice. Will continue reading all I can, and learning all I can before making the jump.

OldDan1943 07-18-2021 12:32 PM

Charter a boat with a captain for a week then, you will have boating experience.
Study up on Rules for (safe) navigation. If you are headed north, generally speaking RED makers on your left. Dont rely on that.... read the charts and if you have display follow that too. If you are unsure, park the boat and study the display and charts.
IF you exit the ICW, and you cross the COLREG line, things are different. If you cross a river feeding the AICW, things are different and and and. LOL My point is, study the rules and chart when planning.
Boating can be fun but, at times it is not a "Road Trip". Take your time, pester your training captain.... An over night trip can be fun.... anchoring is necessary and mooring on a ball.... You can I (we all) can only learn from experience. Let's hope our mistakes are small ones.

BandB 07-18-2021 03:16 PM

First thing is to get some boating experience and training whether from friends or through organizations or then by renting and/or chartering. Also think of budget as boating is far more expensive than a 23' RV. If you charter, you can then research the cost to buy and own a similar boat to the one you were in. I'd recommend for you something in the 30-40' range. A site I'd also recommend is https://www.captainjohn.org/GreatLoopcruising.html . However, I'd largely dismiss his boat recommendations as he often tries to do the loop as cheaply as possible, not in the most enjoyable way.

Comodave 07-18-2021 04:13 PM

Welcome aboard. Have fun looking.

Trainerdude 07-18-2021 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OldDan1943 (Post 1021695)
Charter a boat with a captain for a week then, you will have boating experience.
Study up on Rules for (safe) navigation. If you are headed north, generally speaking RED makers on your left. Dont rely on that.... read the charts and if you have display follow that too. If you are unsure, park the boat and study the display and charts.
IF you exit the ICW, and you cross the COLREG line, things are different. If you cross a river feeding the AICW, things are different and and and. LOL My point is, study the rules and chart when planning.
Boating can be fun but, at times it is not a "Road Trip". Take your time, pester your training captain.... An over night trip can be fun.... anchoring is necessary and mooring on a ball.... You can I (we all) can only learn from experience. Let's hope our mistakes are small ones.



Is chattering a more American thing? I am in Toronto Canada and it seems around here that just means some dude in a big boat will take you out for a few hours to drink with buddies.

And looking in the US, that seems to be a costly endeavour. Wouldn’t it make more sense to buy a smaller boat and use it for a few years learning to do some shorter trips around us…taking classes and maybe hiring a captain for the first bit, then sell it and buy the loop boat?

Trainerdude 07-18-2021 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 1021723)
First thing is to get some boating experience and training whether from friends or through organizations or then by renting and/or chartering. Also think of budget as boating is far more expensive than a 23' RV. If you charter, you can then research the cost to buy and own a similar boat to the one you were in. I'd recommend for you something in the 30-40' range. A site I'd also recommend is https://www.captainjohn.org/GreatLoopcruising.html . However, I'd largely dismiss his boat recommendations as he often tries to do the loop as cheaply as possible, not in the most enjoyable way.



Oh I am sure the costs are greater for sure . Only pay my seasonal site costs and maintenance is much easier. I was more thinking size and that I didn’t really feel uncomfortable here so I don’t think I need a 44’ boat to be happy.

Will check out the site you recommended.

I am reading a lot about chartering but from what I can see that is approx $10k US a week and that just doesn’t seem worth it to me.

OldDan1943 07-18-2021 05:09 PM

A TRAINING Captain does just that, TRAIN you and maybe one other person. He/she is not your drinking buddy. For training, once on the water, the captain may stand at your left shoulder to react if you are in trouble.
Start with a smaller boat, sure. IF for no other reason than to see if you actually enjoy the experience. That is why we suggest you charter a boat.
RVing and boating are not the same other than you cant take much stuff with you. RVing, if it breaks down, finding help is much easier than breaking down a mile or more off shore. If you break down in a well marked waterway, ie. the ICW, you want to get you and your crew out of harms way while waiting for help. Weather turns sour when out in the water away from shore, is not the same as bad weather while RVing.

OldDan1943 07-18-2021 05:31 PM

What one might consider "little wake" has forgotten that wake builds as it move away from your boat AND you are liable for any and all damage to boats tied to docks and to boats underway and medical expenses.
If you elect to slow down when seeing an approaching, your wake may very well rock them dangerously. Your wake may do damage after you are gone.
The ICW is no place to go fast.

BandB 07-18-2021 05:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trainerdude (Post 1021744)
Is chattering a more American thing? I am in Toronto Canada and it seems around here that just means some dude in a big boat will take you out for a few hours to drink with buddies.

And looking in the US, that seems to be a costly endeavour. Wouldn’t it make more sense to buy a smaller boat and use it for a few years learning to do some shorter trips around us…taking classes and maybe hiring a captain for the first bit, then sell it and buy the loop boat?

We keep going through this discussion, no fault of yours, but do you really want to buy a boat, any boat, without knowing whether you and your spouse even like boating? Have you ever spent a week on a boat? The two of you? I'm not saying chartering is the only answer but somehow you need to find out if you even enjoy boating. What about the first waves tossing you around, will you get deathly seasick? Find a friend to go boating with or something. My first boating was as a child and I loved it. However, I've known of many adults who bought nice new boats without the problems of an older cheap boat but realized quickly they'd rather be on land. You know you could do the loop in an RV at a small percentage of the cost, not subject to sitting due to bad seas days, covering the ground much faster at 50 mph vs. 10.

Not at all wanting to discourage you. Just don't know how one with zero boating experience decides a 9000 mile trip on the water is perfect for them. My imagination and boating dreams were fed by previous experiences. Those fed by fantasies may be disappointed qucikly. I hope you're not.

Trainerdude 07-18-2021 07:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 1021768)
We keep going through this discussion, no fault of yours, but do you really want to buy a boat, any boat, without knowing whether you and your spouse even like boating? Have you ever spent a week on a boat? The two of you? I'm not saying chartering is the only answer but somehow you need to find out if you even enjoy boating. What about the first waves tossing you around, will you get deathly seasick? Find a friend to go boating with or something. My first boating was as a child and I loved it. However, I've known of many adults who bought nice new boats without the problems of an older cheap boat but realized quickly they'd rather be on land. You know you could do the loop in an RV at a small percentage of the cost, not subject to sitting due to bad seas days, covering the ground much faster at 50 mph vs. 10.



Not at all wanting to discourage you. Just don't know how one with zero boating experience decides a 9000 mile trip on the water is perfect for them. My imagination and boating dreams were fed by previous experiences. Those fed by fantasies may be disappointed qucikly. I hope you're not.



Well, I guess I should say that although I haven’t driven a boat, I have been on plenty during my younger days as my friends had them, so I grew up around them . My one uncle ran a chartered fishing business and my other uncle owned a marina.

Now, I realize that being in an RV is different than a boat and I realize I could of course do this in an RV, but it’s a different experience.

This statement is what I really find odd “Just don't know how one with zero boating experience decides a 9000 mile trip on the water is perfect for them.”

It’s an adventure….I don’t retire for 15 years and have a hell of a lot of time to learn if I do or don’t like boating. Seems to me, if you don’t after buying a smaller boat, you sell it and move on. But the idea of not dreaming about an adventure when I retire seems silly to me. Why not think about the next step, and how can one ever know truly if they like something if they don’t just go do it? And sure I can charter a boat, but what does that really do? Teach me how to do a few things, I have friends that can show me that….it might help me narrow down a boat, but again is a week enough time?

I appreciate the welcome and I will continue to read here and learn all I can, but I think it’s just a matter of going for it and seeing for myself.

alormaria2 07-18-2021 07:36 PM

Buying a smaller boat and getting experience with it is a great way to go. After you are confident, rent a boat on the Rideau for a week and see how you both like the cruising life.

Jeff F 07-18-2021 07:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trainerdude (Post 1021744)
Is chattering a more American thing? I am in Toronto Canada and it seems around here that just means some dude in a big boat will take you out for a few hours to drink with buddies.

There is a fairly large charter operator in Gore Bay. Mostly sailboats but a couple of power. https://www.cycnorth.com/

But yeah, not much north of the border and east of the Rockies.

rgano 07-18-2021 07:46 PM

By the time you buy a "smaller" boat and then resell it to get the "bigger" boat, that $10K week long charter with a a day or two with an experienced captain will look like chump change. You may well indeed enjoy the first boat and learn good stuff, but you will not recoup the costs associated with buying and then reselling a boat probably at some price reduction to boot.

Trainerdude 07-18-2021 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeff F (Post 1021801)
There is a fairly large charter operator in Gore Bay. Mostly sailboats but a couple of power. https://www.cycnorth.com/

But yeah, not much north of the border and east of the Rockies.



Thanks. That seems a lot better for pricing and something we may consider when looking at a loop boat as the GB32 seems like it could be a good fit.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:47 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012