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angus99 08-23-2017 02:31 PM

Send me your credit card and driver's license
 
I bought an AIS antenna from an online marine warehouse yesterday. This morning, I received the following email.


"Order #3507 has been flagged as high risk for fraud. I am unable to process this order until I have verified the credit card used in this transaction. Please send me a copy of the front of the credit card with the name matching that on the order and a copy of your drivers license with the address matching the billing address on the order and attached to the credit card. Until I receive this information from you I am unable to process your transaction. If you prefer I can send you information to pay via wire transfer. Please let me know how you would like to proceed. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding that this is our policy in order to protect all our customers."


At first I thought they'd been hacked, so I called the number listed on their website. The guy I talked to assured me the request was from his company and couldn't understand why I objected to emailing my credit card and driver's license to him. I told him my credit card wasn't even used for the purchase . . . I used the PayPal link on their site. He said I wouldn't believe the amount of PayPal fraud that goes on, to which I replied "then why do you offer it as an option?" He had no answer.

I've bought many thousands of dollars worth of boating gear on line using PayPal and have never had an issue like this. Needless to say, I immediately cancelled the purchase and will never do business with them again. Anyone else have an experience like this?

ksanders 08-23-2017 02:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by angus99 (Post 586111)
I bought an AIS antenna from an online marine warehouse yesterday. This morning, I received the following email.


"Order #3507 has been flagged as high risk for fraud. I am unable to process this order until I have verified the credit card used in this transaction. Please send me a copy of the front of the credit card with the name matching that on the order and a copy of your drivers license with the address matching the billing address on the order and attached to the credit card. Until I receive this information from you I am unable to process your transaction. If you prefer I can send you information to pay via wire transfer. Please let me know how you would like to proceed. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding that this is our policy in order to protect all our customers."


At first I thought they'd been hacked, so I called the number listed on their website. The guy I talked to assured me the request was from his company and couldn't understand why I objected to emailing my credit card and driver's license to him. I told him my credit card wasn't even used for the purchase . . . I used the PayPal link on their site. He said I wouldn't believe the amount of PayPal fraud that goes on, to which I replied "then why do you offer it as an option?" He had no answer.

I've bought many thousands of dollars worth of boating gear on line using PayPal and have never had an issue like this. Needless to say, I immediately cancelled the purchase and will never do business with them again. Anyone else have an experience like this?

I'm a paypal merchant and do a lot of business using Paypal

If you are a paypal member, and are verified, which most people that have ever
Used paypal are, then the merchant is safe. The only time paypal flags a transaction is if something fishy is going on with the buyer, then paypal will say "do not ship" on the transaction while they figure it out.

This sounds to me like a small business that is overly parinoid.
The beauty of paypal is that the merchant never sees your credit card information. Do Not ever send a paypal merchant your CC information.

angus99 08-23-2017 04:01 PM

My thoughts exactly, ksanders. To even ask someone to send images of their CC and DL via email ranks as one of the most clueless things I've ever seen online.

mbevins 08-23-2017 04:18 PM

I won't even send complete credit card information to a legitimate company.
I always break up the information into 2-3 different emails. Sometimes I even send the segment using different email addresses. Unless of course they're set up to receive it securely.

As to PayPal, if I use that, there's no way in hell he's getting my CC information, defeats the purpose of PayPal.

BandB 08-23-2017 04:30 PM

i would go one step further and report them to Paypal. I would bet this violates Paypals rules. I'm wondering if there is an issue between Paypal and the Merchant. Perhaps the Merchant's lost their account or trying to process outside of Paypal.

I'm with mbevins on legit merchants. In fact, I greatly prefer ordering online vs giving the information on the phone. When we take a phone order, we prefer to then email them a link to allow them to make the payment. Our store employees normally never hold a credit card, never have the information from one. We do see the last four digits. If the customer insists on giving them the information on the phone, they have to fill out an internal exception report. It basically says that they received the information and entered it and never wrote it down. It goes as a manual processing and does get extra review.

Seevee 08-23-2017 04:37 PM

Wow, that's pretty strong to request that, and there's no way I'd do that. And, I'd find another vendor. Good for you, angus99, that sounds crazy.

I don't use PayPal and hate them. They are a PITA and laden with fraud and lawsuits and I wan't no part of it. Just google PayPal lawsuits... you'll have more than you can read in a life time. Don't get me started about them.

My profile is to use a CC that has just enough credit on it to do my normal purchases, and if someone steals it and I get stuck, it will be minimal. That's never happened.

And, yes, only use companies that I can verify as legit.

Works for me.....

angus99 08-23-2017 04:39 PM

Yeah, something doesn't smell right. I'll report them.

john61ct 08-23-2017 04:52 PM

They just didn't want to pay PP's commission.

But amazing enough people would be stupid enough to agree to their request.

twistedtree 08-23-2017 05:04 PM

Who's the merchant?

Sea Q 08-23-2017 05:09 PM

Here is the scam I just learned of it last week
A company sets up a online site and it is a company that pretends to be a large company based in you country with a showroom the office. Or they use another company name under false pretences
It needs paypal or for you to arrange payment to paypal

say $2 k

You pay for it and order They go to some online seller in china pay $1k and it ships from china to you . Pocketing the difference

If breaks you get no customer service you ship it back to their warehouse for return but the address is something else then it gets shipped back to you collect .
pretty sweet scam

BandB 08-23-2017 05:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sea Q (Post 586186)
Here is the scam I just learned of it last week
A company sets up a online site and it is a company that pretends to be a large company based in you country with a showroom the office. Or they use another company name under false pretences
It needs paypal or for you to arrange payment to paypal

say $2 k

You pay for it and order They go to some online seller in china pay $1k and it ships from china to you . Pocketing the difference

If breaks you get no customer service you ship it back to their warehouse for return but the address is something else then it gets shipped back to you collect .
pretty sweet scam

As a business practice, that is known as drop-shipping. Nothing new and not always bad. However, it is often used as you just described and the company provides no support.

The issue is you can't tell sometimes who you're really dealing with.

Now, legitimate drop shipping is as follows. I'll give two examples:

1. Companies that have been around forever and do drop shipping. You can set up with them as a seller and you take the orders and then order from them for delivery to your customer. You purchase at less than their retail price. You can process returns and have them shipped to you or the distributor.

2. There are companies that do stock a lot of product but sometimes use other companies for additional products. Even Wal-mart and Sears do this. So, that other product is shipped from a third party. Again, you pay the normal price. They get a discount.

Now, a couple of hints of ways to check legitimacy. Certainly Google and BBB are starts. Also, Map their street address and see what is there. If they have no street address, that's a reason for question.

There are legitimate websites that are nothing but affiliate sites, earn a commission from the company. However, there are websites that require investigation and shouldn't be trusted.

One place you see this is Canadian Pharmacies. I'm not arguing whether you should or shouldn't use them. However, it's easy enough to pull up a map, get a street view of their brick and mortar pharmacy. Also, to check their licensing. Last, the legitimate ones tell you where each drug is coming from so if some do ship from India, you're told in advance. Sometimes you even get a choice.

Caveat Emptor.

GFC 08-23-2017 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seevee (Post 586164)
I don't use PayPal and hate them. They are a PITA and laden with fraud and lawsuits and I wan't no part of it. Just google PayPal lawsuits... you'll have more than you can read in a life time.

I love PayPal and use it often...to the tune of 2-3 times a week. I am set up with their "One Click" shopping where I click once on that link to complete the transaction.

They already have my shipping info and my bank checking account number. They automatically deduct the amount from my checking, the order is paid for immediately and ships that same day.

As to orders coming from long distances away where shipping time is loooooong, Amazon allows you to cancel the order once you learn how long the shipping will take. One or two clicks is all it takes to canx the order and one of the reasons you can select for cancelling the order is it won't arrive in time.

Seevee 08-23-2017 05:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GFC (Post 586198)
I love PayPal and use it often...to the tune of 2-3 times a week. I am set up with their "One Click" shopping where I click once on that link to complete the transaction.

They already have my shipping info and my bank checking account number. They automatically deduct the amount from my checking, the order is paid for immediately and ships that same day.

As to orders coming from long distances away where shipping time is loooooong, Amazon allows you to cancel the order once you learn how long the shipping will take. One or two clicks is all it takes to canx the order and one of the reasons you can select for cancelling the order is it won't arrive in time.

GFC,

Agree with Amazon, and I order most of my stuff from them. Occasionally with boat parts or specialized stuff they can't compete.

We can disagree on Pay Pal, have some friends that love them, but there's just too many issues with them and I'd not give them my bank account number, nor authorize them do deduct a dime. Their agreement is all for them.

BandB 08-23-2017 05:43 PM

We would greatly prefer not to use Paypal as merchants even though I've always used it for ebay purchases I made. For businesses that are predominantly brick and mortar it's easy not to use them. However, we've found that for businesses that are 100% web businesses, you miss some sales if you don't use it. So we do use it. It costs us internally far more time to account for it, to keep up with it, to respond to inquiries plus it's an entirely different set of rules to live with. We probably never would have used it but we acquired one company that was doing nearly 50% of their business through Paypal.

john61ct 08-23-2017 05:44 PM

Yes PayPal is great for transactions from the buyer's POV.

But don't leave any significant amount in your balance with them, they seize at the drop of a hat and takes forever or never get it back.

Al 08-23-2017 05:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 586191)
As a business practice, that is known as drop-shipping. Nothing new and not always bad. However, it is often used as you just described and the company provides no support.

The issue is you can't tell sometimes who you're really dealing with.

Now, legitimate drop shipping is as follows. I'll give two examples:

1. Companies that have been around forever and do drop shipping. You can set up with them as a seller and you take the orders and then order from them for delivery to your customer. You purchase at less than their retail price. You can process returns and have them shipped to you or the distributor.

2. There are companies that do stock a lot of product but sometimes use other companies for additional products. Even Wal-mart and Sears do this. So, that other product is shipped from a third party. Again, you pay the normal price. They get a discount.

Now, a couple of hints of ways to check legitimacy. Certainly Google and BBB are starts. Also, Map their street address and see what is there. If they have no street address, that's a reason for question.

There are legitimate websites that are nothing but affiliate sites, earn a commission from the company. However, there are websites that require investigation and shouldn't be trusted.

One place you see this is Canadian Pharmacies. I'm not arguing whether you should or shouldn't use them. However, it's easy enough to pull up a map, get a street view of their brick and mortar pharmacy. Also, to check their licensing. Last, the legitimate ones tell you where each drug is coming from so if some do ship from India, you're told in advance. Sometimes you even get a choice.

Caveat Emptor.

Great read! Thanks and I'd bet a lot more have or will thank.:thumb:

kev_rm 08-23-2017 06:34 PM

The credit card companies are extremely sophisticated at detecting fraud.. its not the merchant who does that. so beyond the obvious advice of "don't transmit your credit card details over email" I'd try to find out the reason behind the flagging.

Lepke 08-23-2017 06:56 PM

I buy everything I can online going back to early days of online shopping. Mostly Ebay and Amazon. With Paypal the only time a transaction was held up was because I purchased from someone that had problems issuing timely refunds. It's not Paypal, it's the seller.

angus99 08-23-2017 07:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kev_rm (Post 586237)
The credit card companies are extremely sophisticated at detecting fraud.. its not the merchant who does that. so beyond the obvious advice of "don't transmit your credit card details over email" I'd try to find out the reason behind the flagging.

There is no reason for the flagging and I don't believe any indication of fraud was detected. (Maybe we'll find out for sure when I hear back from PayPal.) We've purchased multiple items before and since this one using PayPal without drama. If it is necessary for PayPal to flag a transaction, there is zero reason for a merchant to ask for credit card information unrelated to that transaction.

GFC 08-23-2017 07:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by john61ct (Post 586204)
But don't leave any significant amount in your balance with them, they seize at the drop of a hat and takes forever or never get it back.

John, that has not been my experience with PP. I've had a couple of disputed purchases where the mdse didn't turn out to be exactly like advertised. I contacted Amazon and PayPal and both stopped the transactions, reversed the charges and made me whole again.

Lou_tribal 08-23-2017 08:10 PM

If any online shopping site would ask me for my credit card inprint and copy of ID my only reaction would be :trash:

L

BruceK 08-23-2017 08:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by angus99 (Post 586111)
I bought an AIS antenna from an online marine warehouse yesterday. This morning, I received the following email.


"Order #3507 has been flagged as high risk for fraud. I am unable to process this order until I have verified the credit card used in this transaction. Please send me a copy of the front of the credit card with the name matching that on the order and a copy of your drivers license with the address matching the billing address on the order and attached to the credit card. Until I receive this information from you I am unable to process your transaction. If you prefer I can send you information to pay via wire transfer. Please let me know how you would like to proceed. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding that this is our policy in order to protect all our customers."


At first I thought they'd been hacked, so I called the number listed on their website. The guy I talked to assured me the request was from his company and couldn't understand why I objected to emailing my credit card and driver's license to him. I told him my credit card wasn't even used for the purchase . . . I used the PayPal link on their site. He said I wouldn't believe the amount of PayPal fraud that goes on, to which I replied "then why do you offer it as an option?" He had no answer.

Makes no sense. Offering the option to pay by a wire service is interesting, payments that way can be irrecoverable. And PayPal was not good enough for them. Cancelling does make sense.
Real fraudsters here ask for i tunes cards. Some people fall for it. The Tax Office getting paid in i tunes cards!? It pays to stay alert.

john61ct 08-23-2017 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GFC (Post 586271)
John, that has not been my experience with PP. I've had a couple of disputed purchases where the mdse didn't turn out to be exactly like advertised. I contacted Amazon and PayPal and both stopped the transactions, reversed the charges and made me whole again.

PP has arbitrarily frozen thousands of members accounts, not talking about specific transactions, just when they decided something fishy might be going on.

And I'm sure properly so in many instances, but it can take many months to even start making human contact.

I'm not saying not to use PP, just keep your balance low.

ksanders 08-23-2017 09:59 PM

As a merchant that takes "click to buy" I only use paypal for my websites. The reasons are several.

1. Many people love the convience of paypal. No filling your ship to info, no entering your CC info, absolute protection for the consumer when you buy tangible material. This increases my sales.

2. Protection for the merchant. I do not hasve to deal with CC information. I am protected against fradulent purchases as long as I carefully follow their rules. My business is B to B in nature so I do not have a charge back problem, but in the rare instance of a issue I have been extremely happy with paypals resolution process.

3. Fair and reasonable fees. We do allot of business with Paypal to the tune of tens of thousands a month. They give us universal CC acceptance, EFT, etc... with one known reasonable fee.

We even advertise "accepts Paypal" on our web sites, which due to their popularity increases sales revenue.

Just last week a customer was having problems with his CC company authorizing a several thousand dollar purchase from my firm via the "normal" CC equipment we have onsite. I asked him if he had a Paypal account, and he did. We had our money in minutes, and shipped his equipment the same day. He was happy and we were happy. Win Win.

As a buyer, or customer I target merchants that accept paypal. It's fast, and easy, and the merchant never sees my CC information. Cant beat that.

BandB 08-23-2017 10:13 PM

Too much like send me $1000 and I'll send you back $1 million. Reminds me of spam offers. Let's see, in the last few hours what I got. Let's see.

Jessica wants to talk, Ananda (yes that's how it was spelled) wants to meet and Jenna will do anything I want to do. Then there's an oil man in Madagascar who is willing to show me how to get a license and make $3 a barrel on all sold under my license, selling 1 million barrels a month for earnings of $3 million a month.

Not sending them anything and not sending someone I don't know all my credit card front and back along with driver's license. The flagging is definitely not Paypal and just some charade on the merchant's part, unless it's the merchant Paypal flagged.

Peter B 08-23-2017 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by angus99 (Post 586152)
My thoughts exactly, ksanders. To even ask someone to send images of their CC and DL via email ranks as one of the most clueless things I've ever seen online.

To me, it sounds like an out and out scam, and it was probably not even the right business phone you rang. No reputable business would ever ask someone to provide such important and personal information. I bet if you contact the business by a different route, eg a phone number from on-line directories, they will be appalled at what happened.

Benthic2 08-24-2017 01:02 AM

You might want to contact your credit card company as well. I'm sure Visa/MC, etc don't want to be dealing with a business that at best, is being very irresponsible, and at worst, is outright fraudulent. That company's email in box is an Identity Theif's wet dream!!

angus99 08-24-2017 06:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter B (Post 586329)
To me, it sounds like an out and out scam, and it was probably not even the right business phone you rang. No reputable business would ever ask someone to provide such important and personal information. I bet if you contact the business by a different route, eg a phone number from on-line directories, they will be appalled at what happened.

It's the correct phone number. These guys are Suzuki outboard dealers and I went through Suzuki's dealer locator to confirm their legitimacy. It will be interesting to see what PayPal has to say.:popcorn:

FF 08-24-2017 09:38 AM

We too use Pay Pal, but have a technique for one time purchases.

We use a debt card .,and load it with about $5.00 more than the total purchase price.

If compromised , they get $5.00 , at best.

I am told a stolen ID will be used for a tiny purchase , to prove the card is valid before being sold.

Hope its sold to folks with no sense of humor!

ksanders 08-24-2017 09:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by angus99 (Post 586416)
It's the correct phone number. These guys are Suzuki outboard dealers and I went through Suzuki's dealer locator to confirm their legitimacy. It will be interesting to see what PayPal has to say.:popcorn:

The only thing that makes sense here is if the payment didnt actually process through paypal.

If you are running a card through your merchant account vs Paypal then you the merchant bear the risk of fraudulent transactions. The worst ones I imagine are the "I did not order that" claim.

If a merchant has been burned they might be inclined to take steps to minimize their risk.

Thinking about outboard motors...

They are the perfect product for credit card thieves to buy. They are high dollar, and easily re-sellable locally for cash.

This merchant might be legitiment, but has just been burned enough that he's put in place extra protections on his part to weed out potential fradulent transactions.

I'm not saying I agree with his method, I'm just saying that I can see why he might be leary of fraudulent customers.

john61ct 08-24-2017 10:34 AM

But asking for what s/he did shows a very amateur-hour business operation, she should know that these days that would raise all kinds of red flags with customers.

Not to mention a liability nightmare if identity theft is traced back to a hack of his system.

john61ct 08-24-2017 10:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FF (Post 586489)
We too use Pay Pal, but have a technique for one time purchases.

We use a debt card .,and load it with about $5.00 more than the total purchase price.

If compromised , they get $5.00 , at best.

I am told a stolen ID will be used for a tiny purchase , to prove the card is valid before being sold.

Hope its sold to folks with no sense of humor!

Belt and suspenders that. The merchant does not get your card info, that's the whole point of PP.

But for merchants that don't take PP, check out AMEX's prepaid Serve.com, let's you create four "sub cards" you can cancel anytime.

Costs $1 a month but they waive it when you're active.

Great for separating ongoing donations / subscriptions.

Group9 08-24-2017 11:08 AM

And, they would like you to send the PIN number that goes along with the credit card, and your mother's maiden name, as well. Just to be sure, you know.

angus99 08-24-2017 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FF (Post 586489)
We too use Pay Pal, but have a technique for one time purchases.

We use a debt card .,and load it with about $5.00 more than the total purchase price.

If compromised , they get $5.00 , at best.

I am told a stolen ID will be used for a tiny purchase , to prove the card is valid before being sold.

Hope its sold to folks with no sense of humor!

My wife and I have discussed doing this.

I am also a proponent of the extra care credit/debit card issuers are taking these days, inconvenient as it sometimes is. Someone (likely a waiter, we think) stole the number off her debit card. We were notified of suspicious activity--two attempted charges of $0.67 to verify the card before the thief sold it. There were two subsequnt attempts to buy hundreds of dollars of merchandise that the issuer declined. All of this activity happened in a single day.

I like the way Europeans handle checks at restaurants, with the card processor brought to the table. The card never leaves the owners' hands.

Seevee 08-24-2017 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by angus99 (Post 586518)
My wife and I have discussed doing this.

I am also a proponent of the extra care credit/debit card issuers are taking these days, inconvenient as it sometimes is. Someone (likely a waiter, we think) stole the number off her debit card. We were notified of suspicious activity--two attempted charges of $0.67 to verify the card before the thief sold it. There were two subsequnt attempts to buy hundreds of dollars of merchandise that the issuer declined. All of this activity happened in a single day.

I like the way Europeans handle checks at restaurants, with the card processor brought to the table. The card never leaves the owners' hands.

I could make an argument to NEVER, EVER pay for a meal with a credit card. Fraud is huge. Cash works, and most often exact change works better.

My buddy with his restaurant has a fraud case going on at all times... never ends. But on his end, if he doesn't accept CC, he looses business.

john61ct 08-24-2017 11:33 AM

Most people I know only use cash for tiny transactions, maybe a few times a month, prefer for everything to be tracked.

Even at our local farmers' market most people use plastic, and of course the SNAP cards most of all.

Won't be too long cash will be viewed with suspicion, then illegal. Already that way for large amounts.

Seevee 08-24-2017 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by john61ct (Post 586522)
Most people I know only use cash for tiny transactions, maybe a few times a month, prefer for everything to be tracked.

Even at our local farmers' market most people use plastic, and of course the SNAP cards most of all.

Won't be too long cash will be viewed with suspicion, then illegal. Already that way for large amounts.

Yea, that's too bad people look at cash as illegal. I still buy big things with cash, and often have to give the bank notice because they don't carry much normally.

Cash works SO WELL, most of the time. Especially when buying cars, boats, toys, meals, junk and women.

I don't want no sinkin records or tracking (unless there's a warranty).

john61ct 08-24-2017 12:25 PM

Just watch out the police don't find it while you're in transit. The current administration is supporting the federal loopholes for states that are trying to crack down on rogue PDs.

BandB 08-24-2017 12:47 PM

I never use cash for anything more than tipping dock hands and such except occasionally an artist or craftsman who doesn't accept cards and then only with full detailed receipt. I'm not comfortable carrying large amounts of cash.Someone robs me and they'll get a very small amount of cash and credit cards which will all be cancelled before they can use them.

As to the other side, receiving large amounts of cash, we do look at it with some degree of suspicion and do very carefully check the bills. Very seldom do we encounter purchases of over $10,000 for cash but when we do, we go through all the Form 8300 procedure. We did have one jewelry customer back out of the sale but otherwise no issue, just time consuming. Most who use large amounts of cash know to stay under that threshold.

In a previous life as a manufacturer, we accepted no cash ever and would send those wanting to pay in cash to the bank to buy a bank check.

While we might wonder about the person using cash, that's not our real concern, once proving it's not counterfeit. The concern is that large amounts of cash put our employees at greater risk and also provide temptation. Cash business is difficult to control and manage.

Donsan 08-24-2017 02:09 PM

The top rated pizza parlor in Gainesville FL doesn't accept credit cards and has shortage of customers and usually a 30 minute wait for a table.

john61ct 08-24-2017 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 586533)
Very seldom do we encounter purchases of over $10,000 for cash but when we do, we go through all the Form 8300 procedure.

Since the amount will never be COL indexed, in the long term the rule becomes a de-facto ban.

BandB 08-24-2017 03:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donsan (Post 586555)
The top rated pizza parlor in Gainesville FL doesn't accept credit cards and has shortage of customers and usually a 30 minute wait for a table.

That always makes me wonder, did they ever? Or did they lose their processing privileges at some point?

john61ct 08-24-2017 04:10 PM

money laundering

Donsan 08-24-2017 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BandB (Post 586584)
That always makes me wonder, did they ever? Or did they lose their processing privileges at some point?

Sorry, I am clueless. It is just one of those cool eclectic hippy joints you find in an old college town. They do have an ATM machine on the premises and claim the ATM fees are donated to charity so they do want to be paid.

It is located fairly close to Mirage Manufacturing of Great Harbour fame.

Group9 08-24-2017 07:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seevee (Post 586520)
I could make an argument to NEVER, EVER pay for a meal with a credit card. Fraud is huge. Cash works, and most often exact change works better.

My buddy with his restaurant has a fraud case going on at all times... never ends. But on his end, if he doesn't accept CC, he looses business.

Yep. A lot of waiters, especially in south Florida, have a sideline as card skimmers for the guys who commit wholesale credit card fraud.

BandB 08-25-2017 12:17 AM

I've never actually known what led to compromise of my card. Always stopped it, mostly before any charges other than the $1 authorization or something and one time after just one charge that made no sense at all.

Our stores have been involved in a couple of identity theft investigations since they always had video of the person using the card. In one, the card owner immediately recognized their housekeeper. The other one turned out to be the wife of an employee in a major credit reporting company. Talk about someone with access.

Think too of every time you've ever filled out a credit application. Those then float around in an office, in files open to many. Janitorial service employees have been known to rummage through files in offices.

sunchaser 08-25-2017 06:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by john61ct (Post 586522)
Most people I know only use cash for tiny transactions, maybe a few times a month, prefer for everything to be tracked.

Even at our local farmers' market most people use plastic, and of course the SNAP cards most of all.

Won't be too long cash will be viewed with suspicion, then illegal. Already that way for large amounts.

Really. Cash works well for many of us who boat in remote locations. In international travel the US $100 and $50 bills carry great weight, still today with CC fraudsters running amok. In Canada the $C50s just fly out of my wallet. Cash always works for various transactions in my world. But, for paying most transactions we like CCs so travel miles get added up.

psneeld 08-25-2017 07:23 AM

Cash still works for me for day to day small transactions. Yet, prefer most larger and equipment purchases to be plastic. Also, often not near places with needed items on hsnd so internet dhopping is necessary.

Some store and restaurants only take cash, have ATMs right near the cashier.

Seevee 08-25-2017 09:04 AM

It's a shame our country (and the world) has so many dishonest people in it. And it hurts all the good people as the govmt wants to know everything about your personal life including the cash you spend.

The only reason govmt wants our info is to get out money, now or in the future. Why do we have to report things that are totally non taxable... same reason.

I could argue for one to be anonymous, as much as can. Keep things out of your personal name and keep a lot profile. And, hard to fight city hall (govt), as they use your money to fight you.

I like cash.

BandB 08-25-2017 10:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Seevee (Post 586828)
Why do we have to report things that are totally non taxable...

We have to report large amounts of cash exchanges to try to control money laundering and profiteering from drug sales and other illegal activities. I think the requirement to report cash transactions is very good and it has eliminated some of the banks that specialized in working with money laudering and some businesses in the business of money laundering.

The second reason for these laws is that it reduces the huge amounts of taxable transactions done with cash by people avoiding taxes.

Just answering that question. Not getting into the rest of your cash and government issues as you and I obviously sit at opposite ends when it comes to cash transactions. While you may do everything legally and still prefer cash, it's also the preferred way of doing business for those involved in illegal activities.

As a totally separate issue, I don't like carrying large amounts of cash around, prefer not to make myself a target as I'm seen flashing bundles of cash while making payments. I'm not going to carry enough cash while boating to pay $15,000 for fuel or pay a thousand dollar restaurant bill.

Most cash I've ever handled was when the company I worked for had cargo planes and only on rare occasions made runs to Europe for existing customers. There they had to pay cash for fuel which meant carrying over $100,000 cash with them. Made all of us most uncomfortable.


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