On the Rocks

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Larry M

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From yesterday morning? A stuck throttle?
 

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Looks like he’s “up on the hard”?
 
Good thing they don't have 20' tides down there :eek:
 
Key West. Built on shipwrecks. An interesting one in Sept was a navy destroyer mistook an island for a fishing boat. "USS Chris Christie, an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, made several attempts to contact the island in an effort to get it to change course. “When the suspected vessel failed to respond, the USS Chris Christie took appropriate action and fired multiple warning shots over its bow,”'

"USS Chris Christie was traveling at a top speed of 30 knots, or 35 mph, when it struck the northern tip of Fleming Key, carving “a nearly straight” river approximately two hundred yards inland before coming to a halt. While no injuries were immediately reported, the 9,000-ton battleship is said to have sustained extensive damage to its hull after it obliterated a concrete structure belonging to the U.S. Army Special Forces Underwater Operations Training Center."

They claimed initially, "faulty navigation equipment."
 
Fake news?

Didnt see the USS Chris Christie on the Navys roster.
 
Key West. Built on shipwrecks. An interesting one in Sept was a navy destroyer mistook an island for a fishing boat. "USS Chris Christie, an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, made several attempts to contact the island in an effort to get it to change course. “When the suspected vessel failed to respond, the USS Chris Christie took appropriate action and fired multiple warning shots over its bow,”'

"USS Chris Christie was traveling at a top speed of 30 knots, or 35 mph, when it struck the northern tip of Fleming Key, carving “a nearly straight” river approximately two hundred yards inland before coming to a halt. While no injuries were immediately reported, the 9,000-ton battleship is said to have sustained extensive damage to its hull after it obliterated a concrete structure belonging to the U.S. Army Special Forces Underwater Operations Training Center."

They claimed initially, "faulty navigation equipment."

Yep, have heard that same joke retold many times over the past 40+ years, using different locations and different ships. :rolleyes:
 
It is a Queenship (65-70'). Hard to understand how this could happen unless the shown waterway is open on the other side and the autopilot put the boat on the rocks at full cruise. Solid FRP bottom hulls, cored hull-sides. Would be interesting to see damage details.
 
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I'm pretty impressed at the speed of the boat to be able to get that far up on the bank.
 
I'm pretty impressed at the speed of the boat to be able to get that far up on the bank.

if the angle of the bow and the rocks were a good match, suprising how easy they slide up.

I have pulled dozens off sod banks that you would swear couldnt have gotten up there at all.....but with the right tide and bank angle, they slide right up.
 
if the angle of the bow and the rocks were a good match, suprising how easy they slide up.

I have pulled dozens off sod banks that you would swear couldnt have gotten up there at all.....but with the right tide and bank angle, they slide right up.

On the lake we once had a boat that left the water split between two trees both angled perfectly so it didn't hit either and landed on a woodpile. Problem was it wouldn't fit back between the trees because they were too close near the bottom, must have sailed through at about 4-5'. When owner of boat came to, the motor (outboard) was still running. He just said, "what happened?" The landowner was furious and wanted the boat gone but would not allow his trees to be touched. Game warden flagged down us and then we got others. The boat was light enough that we were all able to tilt it at an angle to walk it back to the water. Put it in the water and the owner drove it to the marina. Motor was still destroyed but ran ok at half speed to get him there.

And the owner. From history, we know he was likely drunk, the game warden knew that too. Knew he was drinking earlier. However, he showed no signs at all of intoxication. No probable cause for testing. Bob had no memory of going to shore. A fishing boat that he went by on his way to shore reported it. He was going an estimated 50 mph when he passed it.
 
Looks like he’s “up on the hard”?
looking for a silver lining - perhaps he might have time for a quick hull rubdown and at least one coat of anti foul. Save him slipping costs:socool:
 
Have seen this pop up on a couple of sites I look at.


One site there was a posting with pictures from someone who has a boat in the Marina. From there description they were not present when this occurred, but their boat was damaged and they posted pics of the damage.


The explanation there was the throttle stuck wide open. The boat was headed towards a dock that was on the port side of the boat, the captain turned to starboard, over corrected then wound up on the rocks.


The wake from the boat caused damage to several other boats.


Some speculation that in trying to transition between control stations, that's where the throttle went wild.


I have engine kill switches on the helm. Red knobs that shut down the MTU's in an emergency. At first I thought they were overkill, looking at this picture - maybe they are a good thing.


That had to be a wild ride for the person on the helm.
 
I think I've seen that photo before and I saw it on Facebook a couple days ago.

I'm not convinced it's a photo of a real event, it might well be something done with Photoshop or other software. As Abraham Lincoln one said, "Don't believe everything you see on the Internet".
 
USS Chris Christi. That’s a good one. :D
 
It's quite real. We are at a neighboring marina and a friend showed me the picture he snapped. He had also heard that it was a DTS issue and that the captain did not shut down the engines for a strangely long period of time.
 
It's quite real. We are at a neighboring marina and a friend showed me the picture he snapped. He had also heard that it was a DTS issue and that the captain did not shut down the engines for a strangely long period of time.

Shock does funny things to reflexes and judgement.

Some Pro yacht captains have egos that forget they arent invincible
 
Curiosity got the better of me. Regardless of the circumstances this was a bad day for many people and tough to see in person.

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OK, I waited a day before I couldn't resist.
 

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Yours is a real classic, Dave. Pretty amazing then to realize how nice the boat is.
 
Happy to post the site where someone has been sharing some personal experience on this incident.


Not sure about the rules of the forum about posting a link to a different site.


If anyone is interested, can someone tell me if it is ok to post a link?
 
Happy to post the site where someone has been sharing some personal experience on this incident.


Not sure about the rules of the forum about posting a link to a different site.


If anyone is interested, can someone tell me if it is ok to post a link?

Post it.
 
Dave, I remember seeing pictures of your boat on the rocks before you bought it. I can't remember where it happened though. Do you mind telling us?
 
Dave, I remember seeing pictures of your boat on the rocks before you bought it. I can't remember where it happened though. Do you mind telling us?

Colvos Rocks. They are NNE of the entrance to Port Ludlow and NNW of Tala point just about right at 122°40' W.

They are well marked and well known. FWIW, Port Ludlow was the prior owners home port as well.
 
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