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kizif

Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2019
Messages
11
Location
Canada
Vessel Name
Frayed Knot
Vessel Make
2760 Regal
Hey, new member here, long time boater new to cruising
we currently have a 27 express cruiser but are going to upgrade to a larger boat to travel from are home in eastern ontario to the bahamas . looking forward to your insight on what and where to buy.
:)
 
Welcome aboard! Not to worry, the boat will find you!
Cheers
 
Welcome! Be sure to check out Boat Search 101 and one of several articles like this one on doing your own initial survey before paying someone else to disqualify (or qualify) the boat for you.


Good luck!
 
Welcome aboard TF
Agree w both of GreB's suggestion... off to a good start.
Do some searching and reading there are many that have joined w similar goals and questions.
Having boated and bought boat(s) before is an advantage.
A good place to start is for You and Yours? To write down your goals & objectives, what you consider Musts, Wants and Don't Wants
Compare notes and compromise (consider strongly doing it her way)
Then you have a list of criterion to evaluate different boats, layouts and features.

Tell us some more about prior experience and existing boat.

Good luck w the search
 
Welcome from a one time resident of your area. Love the Ottawa valley and the people. Enjoy the forum, it's a great group of like minded people. Be careful about asking any questions on anchors :facepalm:
 
Welcome aboard TF
Agree w both of GreB's suggestion... off to a good start.
Do some searching and reading there are many that have joined w similar goals and questions.
Having boated and bought boat(s) before is an advantage.
A good place to start is for You and Yours? To write down your goals & objectives, what you consider Musts, Wants and Don't Wants
Compare notes and compromise (consider strongly doing it her way)
Then you have a list of criterion to evaluate different boats, layouts and features.

Tell us some more about prior experience and existing boat.

Good luck w the search
Thanks all for the warm welcome,
i grew up n a lake as a kid and got my first boat at 7! was a yellow sea flee as the years went by i switched over to the ottawa river , then we got a 25 cuddie and started traveling to the rideau canal and out to thousand islands. we met a lot of long distance cruisers and got the bug. Now we have a 2765 regal and we love to see new places and people.
So now that i retired this summer the plan is to sell everything and go full time cruising. Canada in the summer and bahama in the winter.
The boat we are looking for is diesel bout 40 ft and hopefully an aft cabin. Would like to have a Tolly but there hard to find around here (east coast).
 
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Welcome. It might be better to find examples of boats you like and ask for others experiences or opinions.
 
Welcome. It might be better to find examples of boats you like and ask for others experiences or opinions.

From what i have been reading , I am thinking a tollycraft 44. It has to be diesel as I am a diesel mechanic /millwright. Not sure if 44 is going to be to much boat for me . I have never coastal cruised, little worried about not getting enough boat to be offshore. It will only be be my wife and I 95% of the time.
Feel free to weigh in with suggestions or thoughts
 
44' is a handful for one but if your wife is spry and wants to learn a few simple skills it shouldn't be too difficult. Size isn't always the determining factor in a safe offshore vessel, I'd suggest you look for accommodations that fit your lifestyle in a boat that's design fits your intended area of operation. You may find that 32' or 36' works well for you. I presently have only a 26' boat but it's an able boat offshore and I like the simplicity and don't mind the camp like accommodations. Plus I'm cheap.
 
44' is a handful for one but if your wife is spry and wants to learn a few simple skills it shouldn't be too difficult. Size isn't always the determining factor in a safe offshore vessel, I'd suggest you look for accommodations that fit your lifestyle in a boat that's design fits your intended area of operation. You may find that 32' or 36' works well for you. I presently have only a 26' boat but it's an able boat offshore and I like the simplicity and don't mind the camp like accommodations. Plus I'm cheap.

The off shore thing intimidates me, and wifey more, but im sure we will get the hang of it.
We are downsizing the house, which will pay for the boat.
We are also on a budget as it has to be affordable on my pension.
 
There's nothing wrong with having an offshore capable boat and not going offshore, there is a problem having a boat that isn't safe offshore and going there anyway. Keep in mind that the bigger half of boating safety is you. Like we used to say on fishing boats "it's better to have the horsepower in the pilothouse than the engine room.
 
Its not that im new to boating, just new to big boating, I have a lot to learn and don't want to do it the hard way. Buying the wong boat would be an expensive lesson for me. I am comfortable on the water, but water and open water are not the same (I think)
This is why I came to the ppl who know. All advice is good advise, It just depends on how you use it.
The more i learn the more I realize I dont know.
:)
 
Welcome kizif;
From another who’s initial foray into boating was the freshwater lakes and rivers of Canada.
Heading offshore can be daunting, but the rewards are worth it. Plan for it and take in all the available information. Having the love of boating in your blood makes the learning experience easier and quicker.
Best wishes.
 
From what i have been reading , I am thinking a tollycraft 44. It has to be diesel as I am a diesel mechanic /millwright. Not sure if 44 is going to be to much boat for me . I have never coastal cruised, little worried about not getting enough boat to be offshore. It will only be be my wife and I 95% of the time.
Feel free to weigh in with suggestions or thoughts

Prior to our 43, the biggest boat I had handled was our 25’ bay boat. I was shocked how easy it is to handle the big boat, especially in close quarters...twin diesels with big wheels are like magic. The Admiral is completely unmechanical, and not particularly spry, but with equipment correctly arranged, she has no problem deploying the anchor, managing fenders, handling dock lines. We love the space we have, and a bonus is the shallower shaft angle on the Hatt 43 gives a draft of 3’5”, letting us get into some tight anchorages. Enjoy the search.
 
The Hatt 43 is a beauty ! Is yours an aft? That's one that's on the wish list.
Wifey is good on the boat, she handles the lines and fenders like a champ, that is when I dont screw up too bad :)
 
Fish
"it's better to have the horsepower in the pilothouse than the engine room."
How true. I like it
 
The Hatt 43 is a beauty ! Is yours an aft? That's one that's on the wish list.
Wifey is good on the boat, she handles the lines and fenders like a champ, that is when I dont screw up too bad :)

Yes, aft cabin. Like all boats, it’s a collection of compromises, but overall it suits us, and we’re really happy with it.
 
Yes, aft cabin. Like all boats, it’s a collection of compromises, but overall it suits us, and we’re really happy with it.

Ive seen a few online with detroit's, is yours detroit's,and if so are you happy with them?
 
Ive seen a few online with detroit's, is yours detroit's,and if so are you happy with them?

No, 3208T’s, 302hp variant, and we’re very happy with them. We’re fair weather, hull speed cruisers, so the low HP doesn’t bother us; if we’re trying to outrun a squall line, we can coax it up to maybe 15 or 16 knots. We get good fuel economy (2 1/4 mpg) at hull speed, they’re relatively quiet, and are easy to work on.
 
No, 3208T’s, 302hp variant, and we’re very happy with them. We’re fair weather, hull speed cruisers, so the low HP doesn’t bother us; if we’re trying to outrun a squall line, we can coax it up to maybe 15 or 16 knots. We get good fuel economy (2 1/4 mpg) at hull speed, they’re relatively quiet, and are easy to work on.

Sounds like your on my dream boat, just drop it off for me in Ottawa.
take a check?:D
I like the hatts and tollys, I love the classic timeless look.
Just have to find one in good shape that fits our budget
 
Just about any diesel powered boat is quite capable of the type of cruising you describe. No need to look for an "offshore" boat. Between Ottawa and the Abacos you only have two open water passages of around 50 miles. ... Across Lake Ontario to Oswego and then From Florida to West End. The only unavoidable ocean work is about four hrs. from New York Harbour then you can go back inside at Masasquan.

We started out with a 37' trawler and it was amazing. grand kids came along and we needed more space so went up to 47'. We are now back to 38'. We found that the bigger boat locked us out of too many of our favourite anchorages and marinas.

Then we get into the while twin/single thing. 22,000 hrs cruising since 1994 on a single and only had to be towed in once. Our fuel cost on our 38' single from the Abacos home to Toronto this year was $1300US.

This one is a little dated but you might find it interesting. Primer For First Timers Heading South
Lots to consider.
 
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Welcome aboard. i am new on here to less then a year . There is a lot of good info on here again Welcome Aboard BR
 
Boat for Ontario to Bahamas

You didn't mention issues like budget, etc., and you'll probably want to take the Intercoastal, so draft is a concern. My boat was a 43' Tolly, but they're fairly rare (only 40-45 built), not too many East. They're also getting old, and very hard to ship, flybridge is too high.
Since you're already East, have you thought of the only-produced-for-a-few-years 43' Sabrelines built in Maine? Twin Diesel, good profiles for both slow and relatively fast running, US-built, and seem to have depreciated a lot, but settling now in price since they came out of production. They knocked off most of the 43 Tolly layout, but with modern windows, doors, and some good layout improvements. Wonderful engine room!
Another fine boat but a little smaller, built in Canada if you want a good one (earlier ones were built in China and Latin America and weren't great) is the 36' Monk, a single Cummins Diesel but bow thrusters were standard. Slightly constricting aft cabin bed headroom but owners love them.
Obviously, I'm a dual-cabin layout lover like the GB 42's, and a lot of older ones (1993 or so after they were widened) are priced within this universe, but if I could afford it, I'd get a boat that uses even more-modern fittings with the better space use that modern design technology affords.
Hope this adds to your thinking with expanding the confusion.
The Bellingham Yacht Club has a good "Boat Buyer's Checklist" piece I wrote a while back you might find useful. It is attached.
 

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You didn't mention issues like budget, etc., and you'll probably want to take the Intercoastal, so draft is a concern. My boat was a 43' Tolly, but they're fairly rare (only 40-45 built), not too many East. They're also getting old, and very hard to ship, flybridge is too high.
Since you're already East, have you thought of the only-produced-for-a-few-years 43' Sabrelines built in Maine? Twin Diesel, good profiles for both slow and relatively fast running, US-built, and seem to have depreciated a lot, but settling now in price since they came out of production. They knocked off most of the 43 Tolly layout, but with modern windows, doors, and some good layout improvements. Wonderful engine room!
Another fine boat but a little smaller, built in Canada if you want a good one (earlier ones were built in China and Latin America and weren't great) is the 36' Monk, a single Cummins Diesel but bow thrusters were standard. Slightly constricting aft cabin bed headroom but owners love them.
Obviously, I'm a dual-cabin layout lover like the GB 42's, and a lot of older ones (1993 or so after they were widened) are priced within this universe, but if I could afford it, I'd get a boat that uses even more-modern fittings with the better space use that modern design technology affords.
Hope this adds to your thinking with expanding the confusion.
The Bellingham Yacht Club has a good "Boat Buyer's Checklist" piece I wrote a while back you might find useful. It is attached.

Thanks for the info, I have not picked out a boat yet. We have just started the process of downsizing. So that being said, Im not sure what the budget will be for the purchase. Think around 100,000 cad will probably be the number + or - .
Thanks for your input on these boats, I will check them out. I have been doing a lot of reading on the subject. There is a lot to learn. When I get to the point that im going to buy, I will post here so people with experience can guide me along. :thumb:
 
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