Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-24-2016, 01:55 AM   #81
TF Site Team
 
City: Ex-Brisbane, (Australia), now Bribie Island, Qld
Vessel Name: Now boatless - sold 6/2018
Vessel Model: Had a Clipper (CHB) 34
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 8,965
Quote:
Originally Posted by smitty477 View Post
"Do boats typically have EGT and CHT indications like planes do? Or is it really valuable? Suspect that just the water temp would give a good indication of damaging temps."

Really really good questions.....
Boats typically do not have EGT gages.
Water temps are not good indicators of EGT , not at all
It is very inexpensive to add EGT gages which will supply the data real time
EGT is affected by many factors or loading including too much prop/boat weight/trim/ambient temps and humidity and bottom and running gear growth.

I'lll find a pic of the last EGT gages I installed on my last boat for like $200 total.
Ok, ok, I'll bite. What the heck are EGT and CHT gauges. Boost I understand, my car has one, but please exchange these abbreviations, and what they are measuring.

However, one other thing worth ventilating, if we go on with this turbo thing, is that folk are really wasting their time worrying about under-loading turbo engines. Think about it. Most of the time a car turbo is just spinning but not boosting - Unless you're a real lead-foot or racing - doesn't hurt them. My car has done 300,000 km, original turbo. Same with boats. If you use the boost to get on the plane, you might find they are still boosting to stay up there, but not much, and if you drop off the plane, or are not a planing hull, then once up to cruising speed the turbo won't be boosting unless pushing into a huge headway. Again...I suspect it doesn't matter, as they are just spinning slower in the exhaust stream , and if tuned properly, carbon build-up will be more theoretical than real, and nothing the odd burst at a fuller throttle won't clear off. So, again....not something to lose sleep over.

However, as Baker has pointed out, in the case of aircraft, the turbo is more useful at overcoming the less dense air issue up high, rather than for increased low level performance, although no doubt does add some extra oomph at take-off.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Pete
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 06:18 AM   #82
TF Site Team/Forum Founder
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Vessel Name: Floatsome & Jetsome
Vessel Model: Meridian 411
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 7,139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
Ok, ok, I'll bite. What the heck are EGT and CHT gauges. Boost I understand, my car has one, but please exchange these abbreviations, and what they are measuring.

However, one other thing worth ventilating, if we go on with this turbo thing, is that folk are really wasting their time worrying about under-loading turbo engines. Think about it. Most of the time a car turbo is just spinning but not boosting - Unless you're a real lead-foot or racing - doesn't hurt them. My car has done 300,000 km, original turbo. Same with boats. If you use the boost to get on the plane, you might find they are still boosting to stay up there, but not much, and if you drop off the plane, or are not a planing hull, then once up to cruising speed the turbo won't be boosting unless pushing into a huge headway. Again...I suspect it doesn't matter, as they are just spinning slower in the exhaust stream , and if tuned properly, carbon build-up will be more theoretical than real, and nothing the odd burst at a fuller throttle won't clear off. So, again....not something to lose sleep over.

However, as Baker has pointed out, in the case of aircraft, the turbo is more useful at overcoming the less dense air issue up high, rather than for increased low level performance, although no doubt does add some extra oomph at take-off.
EGT=Exhaust Gas Temperature
CHT=Cylinder Head Temperature

You will also hear EGT gauges referred to as Pyro gauges. EGT is a fairly useful measure of work being done. The hotter it is, the more work is being done. EGT gauges do different things in airplanes. THey obviously measure the same thing, but in an airplane, you have control of the mixture. As you climb, one needs to adjust the mixture as the air gets thinner. There are ways to do that as it relates to EGT. As you lean the mixture, EGTs rise...to a point and then fall off. So engine manufactures will recommend "20 degrees lean of peak"...IOW, you lean the mixture to the peak EGT and then continue to lean it until the EGT falls 20 degrees on the lean side of the peak EGT. Or maybe they want 20 degrees on the rich side of peak...whatever. Add turbocharged engines to the mix and this becomes even more important since you have more air and can burn more fuel.

Now, as it relates to my particular boat and boost and the way I run my boat. I have a planing boat and I operate on plane. And trust me, the turbos are pumped up and running. I run 2400RPM on a 2800RPM engine. There is work being done!!! Now my boat is fairly underpropped so it is not working as hard as a boat that was propped dead on or even overpropped. Again, if you had an EGT gauge you get a good idea of the work being done. An overpropped boat running the same RPM as an underpropped boat would have a much higher EGT because the load is higher and more work is being done.

Comparing a turbo car to a planing turbodiesel boat is totally apples to oranges because a car is not nearly as loaded up as a boat. Water is a much denser medium than air and it has to continue to push thru that medium.

ANd an airplane that has a turbonormalized engine produces no more power at sea level than a naturally aspirated engine of the same horsepower. I have flown a C310 with IO520s and one with TIO520s. Both engines are rated at 300hp. So no extra oomph on takeoff. The only difference is the TIO520 will maintain that power to a much higher altitude. The NA engine is losing power the minute you leave the ground.

And let us not forget....not all airports are at sea level. Turbocharged airplanes provide greater "lift capability" at higher density altitude airports.

PS...nomenclature for piston aircraft engines IO520 means (fuel)Injected and Opposed(flat horizontally opposed cylinders) The "T" in TIO just means Turbocharged. The 520 is cubic inch displacement.
__________________

__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B...Sold
Meridian 411...T-Cummins 450C
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 06:50 AM   #83
Guru
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,274
Peter B
EGT is an abbreviation for exhaust gas temperature.
CHT is cylinder head temperature.
I am a little surprised that someone is monitoring cylinder head temperature in a water cooled diesel engine as I tend to equate the importance of that measurement with air cooled engines.
Exhaust temperature as measured before the turbo is a useful indicator of effeciancy along with a way of monitoring for engine damaging levels of heat in the exhaust system.

As for boost pressure and turbo compressor speed, I think you are sort of correct. On a turbocharged Diesel engine, the turbo begins actually spinning the second the engine is running, just not at a very high speed. So yes, the turbo is always spinning on these engines (at least on any diesel I have ever worked on...). They do however develop boost more easily than you think. Even the Cummins ISB 6.7 in my Ram 2500 develops boost any time I press the throttle.
It has a boost gauge built into the display and I like to watch it sometimes.
When the truck is not loaded, just driving along at say 30 miles per hour, a slight press of the pedal creates boost. We all know that an unloaded road vehicle at 30 mph has far less load on it than any boat moving through the water...
When we had the opportunity to go on the 100 mile mini delivery of the Cummins powered American Tug, I watched boost levels and that engine saw boost even at non planing speeds. I didn't record numbers though, kind of wish I did...
I think that the common rail injected engines do run much cleaner over a greater range of conditions than mechanically injected engines though. This likely leads to less need of boost pressure to keep the engine and turbo turbine clean.

Bruce
Bruce B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 09:17 PM   #84
Guru
 
Seevee's Avatar
 
City: st pete
Vessel Model: 430 Mainship
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 2,906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
One of the things that might be confusing you is "turbo normalizing" used in aviation. The biggest reason aircraft engines are turbocharged is NOT to boost power. It is to maintain sea level power while at altitude. Is more work being done producing sea level power at altitude? Is more heat generated? I think there is but am not totally sure as to why. I might need to meditate on that for awhile. I just know I have flown a turbo 310 at night and could see the turbos(or related hardware) glowing thru the cowling vents.
Anyway, don't get too caught up on the aviation deal. Aircraft engines aren't turbocharged for the same reasons. At least not totally. So it is not necessarily apples to apples.
Baker, Sounds like you have an aviation background, too... Also fun and expensive as boats but not sure which is worse. When we meet sometime, this is a good subject for cocktail hour......can beat it to death.

Agreed the turbo in aviation has a bit different goal than in marine or auto... primarily to give the plane altitude (and provide for pressurization, maybe).

And also agree, they ALL produce heat. You can't compress air like a turbo does without heat, which can be an issue. That's where intercoolers help. Turbo normalizing is the vast minority of planes out there but I like the concept better.... less stress, can use a high compression engine, no "over boost" issues (for the most part) and generally is more economical that a regular turbod engine. Yes the "normalized" turbo maintains sea level pressure but does not increase it, while a regular turbo charger may increase it up to 45 inches or more, which does give more take off power.

But, as to the marine version.... because boats don't fly very high, the turbo is mainly to get more power out of a smaller engine, and there's some merit to that. So, there's no need for a turbo normalized engine in a boat... only on that is boosted above sea level pressure.

But in all turbos, there is an extra part and extra maintenance, so one has to decide if that's a value in his operation. And the percentage of turbo diesels in boats is WAY higher than piston airplanes... so they are VERY popular..... or at least the manufacturers think so.

I'm still not totally sold, but seems like a well maintained turbo diesel isn't an awful bad idea. I'm still leaned on having a bigger engine that's non turbo'd, just like I prefer in aviation. Simple. I'm still waiting to be convinced the turbo is a better deal.
__________________
Seevee
Seevee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 09:33 PM   #85
Guru
 
Seevee's Avatar
 
City: st pete
Vessel Model: 430 Mainship
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 2,906
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
Peter B
EGT is an abbreviation for exhaust gas temperature.
CHT is cylinder head temperature.
I am a little surprised that someone is monitoring cylinder head temperature in a water cooled diesel engine as I tend to equate the importance of that measurement with air cooled engines.
Exhaust temperature as measured before the turbo is a useful indicator of efficiency along with a way of monitoring for engine damaging levels of heat in the exhaust system.

As for boost pressure and turbo compressor speed, I think you are sort of correct. On a turbocharged Diesel engine, the turbo begins actually spinning the second the engine is running, just not at a very high speed. So yes, the turbo is always spinning on these engines (at least on any diesel I have ever worked on...). They do however develop boost more easily than you think. Even the Cummins ISB 6.7 in my Ram 2500 develops boost any time I press the throttle.
It has a boost gauge built into the display and I like to watch it sometimes.
When the truck is not loaded, just driving along at say 30 miles per hour, a slight press of the pedal creates boost. We all know that an unloaded road vehicle at 30 mph has far less load on it than any boat moving through the water...
When we had the opportunity to go on the 100 mile mini delivery of the Cummins powered American Tug, I watched boost levels and that engine saw boost even at non planing speeds. I didn't record numbers though, kind of wish I did...
I think that the common rail injected engines do run much cleaner over a greater range of conditions than mechanically injected engines though. This likely leads to less need of boost pressure to keep the engine and turbo turbine clean.

Bruce
Bruce,
One doesn't need to monitor CHT in a boat, as they can monitor water temp, but need to know the engine is the right temp.

As for EGT, perhaps a measurement that may or may not be needed. However, it's more of a "relative" measurement whereas the CHT or water temps are absolute. But EGT temps are almost instant for giving information and the water or CHT are slower to respond.

Just FWIW.... my plane monitors the EGT and CHT on every cylinder and I can tell if an issue is developing instantly, and often diagnose it before ever landing. And can later download the info to a computer (with a lot of other data) for diagnosis and trend analysis. I'd like to have that kind of info on a boat.... but not sure if it's that common... or necessary. Perhaps someone can clue me in.

I don't see where the EGT has anything to do with efficiency. Efficiency is measure with fuel consumption and performance.

As for the turbo spinning, I don't know of a turbo engine where the turbo is not spinning, even as the engine is starting. The "control" of a turbo is down stream of the turbo unit with a waste gate that will direct the compressed air into the engine, or overboard depending on the power needed. If it were uncontrolled it would power the engine up to destruction... maybe.

There are a lot different designs of turbo systems, it's hard to explain all of them, other than just the basics. However, they all have the same function... to get more power out of an engine.
__________________
Seevee
Seevee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2016, 10:57 PM   #86
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,252
I like turbo charged diesels. Had a couple in boats, had them in pickup trucks where they are really fun.
As long as you let them cool a bit, they last a very long time. in a boat make sure the exhaust is designed and built properly to keep the salt water out and they will last a long time.
__________________
Jay Leonard

New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2016, 01:33 AM   #87
Guru
 
North Baltic sea's Avatar
 
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
Baker, Sounds like you have an aviation background, too... Also fun and expensive as boats but not sure which is worse. When we meet sometime, this is a good subject for cocktail hour......can beat it to death.

Agreed the turbo in aviation has a bit different goal than in marine or auto... primarily to give the plane altitude (and provide for pressurization, maybe).

And also agree, they ALL produce heat. You can't compress air like a turbo does without heat, which can be an issue. That's where intercoolers help. Turbo normalizing is the vast minority of planes out there but I like the concept better.... less stress, can use a high compression engine, no "over boost" issues (for the most part) and generally is more economical that a regular turbod engine. Yes the "normalized" turbo maintains sea level pressure but does not increase it, while a regular turbo charger may increase it up to 45 inches or more, which does give more take off power.

But, as to the marine version.... because boats don't fly very high, the turbo is mainly to get more power out of a smaller engine, and there's some merit to that. So, there's no need for a turbo normalized engine in a boat... only on that is boosted above sea level pressure.

But in all turbos, there is an extra part and extra maintenance, so one has to decide if that's a value in his operation. And the percentage of turbo diesels in boats is WAY higher than piston airplanes... so they are VERY popular..... or at least the manufacturers think so.

I'm still not totally sold, but seems like a well maintained turbo diesel isn't an awful bad idea. I'm still leaned on having a bigger engine that's non turbo'd, just like I prefer in aviation. Simple. I'm still waiting to be convinced the turbo is a better deal.
I think that you think fairly narrowly turbo. From the outset intended to improve efficiency and provide more power.

here is a good example. Dald diesel engine 18-22. 33 liter, 220Hp turbo + intercooler, + 5000kg mass. RMP 400-800.

this machine has a 28m trawler vessel weight 110000kg, at a speed of 8 knots consumption of 4-5 gal / hour. 160 g / kwh. I think that the volume of the machine 33 liters vs power 220Hp is quite small. the question why the machine is equipped with a turbo even modestly power? 18-22 The figures come from the cylinder diameter - stroke in centimeters.


Video this diesel.
https://youtu.be/wYm6a6GK82Y
North Baltic sea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2016, 08:31 AM   #88
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 9,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
There are a lot different designs of turbo systems, it's hard to explain all of them, other than just the basics. However, they all have the same function... to get more power out of an engine.
Power in a diesel is only part of the turbos reason for being there. Today, turbos are an essential part of meeting Tier XYZ emissions. The diesel engine manufacturers found out decades ago that by recirculating hot exhaust power gains were achieved and some unwanted pollutants were lowered.

When stricter emission requirements were introduced it became apparent that a combination of off gas measurement, more precise fuel metering, inlet pressure etc all were tied together via on engine chips not only monitoring but changing these variables hundreds of times per second. Without these controls and related hardware (including turbos) today's diesels could not achieve compliance.

You have no choice, buying a new diesel involves buying a turbo. For those few on TF that have FD older vessels, keeping the old NAs diesels going seems a logical choice.

BTW, ever seen a SeaRay with an NA? Me neither.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2016, 10:39 AM   #89
Guru
 
Seevee's Avatar
 
City: st pete
Vessel Model: 430 Mainship
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 2,906
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunchaser View Post
Power in a diesel is only part of the turbos reason for being there. Today, turbos are an essential part of meeting Tier XYZ emissions. The diesel engine manufacturers found out decades ago that by recirculating hot exhaust power gains were achieved and some unwanted pollutants were lowered.

When stricter emission requirements were introduced it became apparent that a combination of off gas measurement, more precise fuel metering, inlet pressure etc all were tied together via on engine chips not only monitoring but changing these variables hundreds of times per second. Without these controls and related hardware (including turbos) today's diesels could not achieve compliance.

You have no choice, buying a new diesel involves buying a turbo. For those few on TF that have FD older vessels, keeping the old NAs diesels going seems a logical choice.

BTW, ever seen a SeaRay with an NA? Me neither.
Sunchaser,

Good points, didn't know that it was easier with emissions control with a turbo... don't understand why it couldn't be done with a NA engine... they both have exhaust.

SeaRay with an NA (normally aspirated)?? Thousands of them.

Merry Christmas
__________________
Seevee
Seevee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2016, 12:32 PM   #90
TF Site Team/Forum Founder
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Vessel Name: Floatsome & Jetsome
Vessel Model: Meridian 411
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 7,139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
Sunchaser,

Good points, didn't know that it was easier with emissions control with a turbo... don't understand why it couldn't be done with a NA engine... they both have exhaust.

SeaRay with an NA (normally aspirated)?? Thousands of them.

Merry Christmas
The turbo burns more cleanly and therefore less exhaust pollutants.

And his reference to Sea Rays are diesel powered Sea Rays. Have you ever seen a NA diesel powered Sea Ray???
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B...Sold
Meridian 411...T-Cummins 450C
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2016, 04:45 PM   #91
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 9,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
SeaRay with an NA (normally aspirated)?? Thousands of them. Merry Christmas
I thought the base subject was about turbocharged diesels.

Here is a question SV, are you planning on buying a diesel powered vessel, if so, which one? Now that could be a fun productive topic.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2016, 11:07 PM   #92
Guru
 
Seevee's Avatar
 
City: st pete
Vessel Model: 430 Mainship
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 2,906
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunchaser View Post
I thought the base subject was about turbocharged diesels.

Here is a question SV, are you planning on buying a diesel powered vessel, if so, which one? Now that could be a fun productive topic.
Yes the subject is diesels..... didn't read that clearly.

Don't know what diesel vessel I'd get... but all the one's I've looked at look good and all have their goods and bads. Kadey, Carver, Meridian, SeaRay, and Regal.... will see more after the holiday.
__________________
Seevee
Seevee is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2016, 07:29 AM   #93
Guru
 
roguewave's Avatar
 
City: Hill Country TX/S.Portland Maine
Vessel Name: bout’ time
Vessel Model: Grady White 282 Sailfish
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 642
Turbo = fun, in cars that is. We have a couple of twin turbo cars/trucks and they are a pleasure.

Recreational boats? For me, turbos are not fun, give me a NA engine...if possible.

That's all I got...
__________________
..."some gave all, KIA"...
roguewave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2016, 09:15 AM   #94
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale. Florida, USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 20,289
Quote:
Originally Posted by roguewave View Post
Turbo = fun, in cars that is. We have a couple of twin turbo cars/trucks and they are a pleasure.

Recreational boats? For me, turbos are not fun, give me a NA engine...if possible.

That's all I got...
And I've never owned a non-turbo diesel and had no issues with turbos. I'm afraid this may well be another generational issue, both the generation of the boater and of the engine. Whether the good old days were really as good as remembered, I can't say, as I wasn't there. Reality is that technology advances. Engines today are common rail and turbo and while early versions might have been problematic, they aren't today. In fact, both of those developments are significant advancements.

I don't understand why you'd be a turbo fan in land vehicles and not in water, but gradually it won't matter whether a fan or not, there will be no choice. I've heard stories of how many thought Catalytic Converters on autos were the end of the world as it was known and now we have a generation that has never known anything different.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2016, 12:18 PM   #95
TF Site Team/Forum Founder
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Vessel Name: Floatsome & Jetsome
Vessel Model: Meridian 411
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 7,139
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post

I don't understand why you'd be a turbo fan in land vehicles and not in water,
The heat exchange is between air and water. And that water happens to be seawater in this case. Seawater is corrosive. Not to mention that if your inter/aftercooler leaks, that seawater goes straight into the intake of your engine.

On this subject, the vast majority of boat owners with high powered turbocharged diesels don't know that aftercoolers require service. A service that can prevent the above from happening. There are boat owners, maybe the B&Bs of the world, that have their engines "serviced" and have no idea what is being done. I mean no disrespect there. My point being you do get into a realm of "managed" boat service where the owner does not know every little detail. So turbodiesels do require a little more vigilance than land based turbo applications and if that vigilance is neglected, the consequences could be severe!!!
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B...Sold
Meridian 411...T-Cummins 450C
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2016, 03:17 PM   #96
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale. Florida, USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 20,289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
The heat exchange is between air and water. And that water happens to be seawater in this case. Seawater is corrosive. Not to mention that if your inter/aftercooler leaks, that seawater goes straight into the intake of your engine.

On this subject, the vast majority of boat owners with high powered turbocharged diesels don't know that aftercoolers require service. A service that can prevent the above from happening. There are boat owners, maybe the B&Bs of the world, that have their engines "serviced" and have no idea what is being done. I mean no disrespect there. My point being you do get into a realm of "managed" boat service where the owner does not know every little detail. So turbodiesels do require a little more vigilance than land based turbo applications and if that vigilance is neglected, the consequences could be severe!!!
Same reason marine engines require more vigilance than car or truck engines. Just part of the deal that we have to maintain.

Although I don't personally do it, I am aware of the service requirements. Part of the every two years service on MAN's, as an example, is Changing Valve Caps on Expansion Tanks, and Cleaning the intercooler, the charge-air pipes, the turbocharger and the heat exchanger. We religiously follow the manual and factory recommended service intervals. These are the only service that is tied only to time, not at all to hours.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2016, 03:36 PM   #97
Technical Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 6,183
Every moment the marine engine is shutdown, the turbo is exposed to 100% humidity from the wet exhaust plumbing that is usually a foot or two away. Cast iron does not like it, especially when its rot changes the dimensions on the turbine housing. Not so much an issue on a natural.

Add to that the soaking wet aftercooler core loaded with condensation after coming off power.

Both these can and do damage the marine turbo diesel. and are generally not an issue on cars. And the manuals just ignore these realities.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2016, 11:55 PM   #98
TF Site Team/Forum Founder
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Vessel Name: Floatsome & Jetsome
Vessel Model: Meridian 411
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 7,139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
...... And the manuals just ignore these realities.........
Bingo!!!!! The manufacturer does not always know best!!!!
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B...Sold
Meridian 411...T-Cummins 450C
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2016, 12:00 AM   #99
TF Site Team/Forum Founder
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Vessel Name: Floatsome & Jetsome
Vessel Model: Meridian 411
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 7,139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
Baker, Sounds like you have an aviation background, too... Also fun and expensive as boats but not sure which is worse. When we meet sometime, this is a good subject for cocktail hour......can beat it to death.
That I do. It is what I do for a living. 9 type ratings and 18,000 hours. I will keep a beer cold for you!!!...
__________________

__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B...Sold
Meridian 411...T-Cummins 450C
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×