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Old 08-15-2018, 06:37 PM   #21
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From Blackstone Labs:

"If your oil is too light, the bearing metals can increase. If the oil is too heavy, the upper end metals can increase. The trick is to find the right viscosity for your particular engine, which is why we suggest following the manufacturer's recommendation."

Their position on the subject, of course, and limited in scope, but at least there's some explanation as to the potential harm (or lack thereof) from the wrong viscosity, from their oil analysis point of view.

https://www.blackstone-labs.com/oil-viscosity.php
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Old 08-16-2018, 06:23 AM   #22
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With a sea water cooled engine , about 140F or below coolant keeps the salt from clogging the engine.

Single weight oil was probably specified as the oil will never get warm enough for the thicking agents to perform.

If you now have some sort of Fresh Water cooling switching to a 180F thermostat and using multi grade oil might be acceptable.

Many folks use single weight oil as there is more oil in the oil.

"Modern" oils are high detergent so the engine can eat its exhaust for the air police.
Some oils will contain up to 20% of their volume detergents , anti foam agents , rust inhibitors etc.

Old non EGR engines do not require these , so some folks prefer oil in the oil to a useless chemical pack.
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Old 08-16-2018, 06:35 AM   #23
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I would check with Yanmar. They very well may have put out a service bulletin modifying their oil recommendations. Many engine manufacturers recommended single weight oil thru the late 80s early 90s before accepting the benefits of multi weight oil.

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Old 08-16-2018, 08:11 PM   #24
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At times.... any oil is better then no oil.... that be said I drive diesels OTR big trucks from 15L motors to smaller chassis small 6.7L motors. Up until a few years ago the standard was 15w-40. Now I've read guys running 10w30 because of better mpg and no ill effects. The new 6.7l ford motor we use 10w30 syn and the Cummins and mercades still get 15w40 with 2 quarts of Lucas added. The benz has 340,000 miles on her and the Cummins is up to 200,000 road miles being driven local. Benz is changed at 10k miles the Cummins is when the computer says.

Imo change your oil in a good interval and it's how you run your motor. No need to be running it hard all day long and be gentle on the acceleration.

I would not be fearful to add a multigrade oil to your motor. See what would supersede a 20w oil and go from there. In my understanding the multi grades are for cold and hot oil viscosity ratings.
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Old 08-16-2018, 08:55 PM   #25
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Just a little more info. My engine is 1981 or so, Yanmar 3HM. Designed as a raw water cooled engine though originally installed with keel cooling. It runs at 140-150 F. I hadn't thought about this before but at that temp the oil is also at that temp so the multi grade oil is not being used to its full range. Whatever that means.
With these low temperatures the oil probably never gets hot enough to boil-off the condensation out of the oil. Without frequent changes your oil may be prone to sludge build-up.
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Old 08-16-2018, 09:32 PM   #26
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Many engine manufacturers recommended single weight oil thru the late 80s early 90s before accepting the benefits of multi weight oil.
It wasn't necessarily being slow to see the light. Engineers like to test and see what works before changing from a known safe regimen. It was often waiting until multigrade oils "did not suck," so to speak. Early on, in the 70s and into the 90s, they were often terrible. Very rudimentary stuff was used as VII's - viscosity index improvers - the particles that will expand when hot and thus modify the base oil's natural natural viscosity at that temperature into something thicker. Early on, chopped-up tennis shoes were even used. Yep.

Many of the early VIIs were just terrible and carboned up engines something horrible. Even now, as FF was describing above, you can have oil that is 20% "other stuff" that does no lubricate in order to achieve a wide viscosity spread - cheaper 5w-30s and also some synthetic 0w-XX oils are a whole lot of additive. These additive molecules are often enormous compared to base oil molecules and do not stand up to shear forces in the engine over time.

What FF said above is very relevant wrt the benefits of monograde oils in the right applications. If your climate conditions do not warrant 5w,0w winter ratings, you are doing your engine no favor by using them.
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Old 08-20-2018, 01:27 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by ak-guy View Post
Just a little more info. My engine is 1981 or so, Yanmar 3HM. Designed as a raw water cooled engine though originally installed with keel cooling. It runs at 140-150 F. I hadn't thought about this before but at that temp the oil is also at that temp so the multi grade oil is not being used to its full range. Whatever that means.

I have a 3HM35F, and the original manual. I agree that on page 13-4 it says use 30w from 68-95 degrees, but on the top of the next page in the first paragraph it says, "oil having a viscosity equal to that of SAE30, even at 98.9C is called SAE 10-30, or multigrade oil"


At the bottom of the page it says the "New" classification CB or CD grade should be used, introduced 1961 and 1955 respectively.



It summarizes the whole thing on page 13-6, by oil brand name, but it's useless because in 1981 they didn't know what would be available today.


1. You probaby can't find a CC or CD oil these days so you'll have to use a better, more moden oil. :-)
2. Use 10-30 if you want to please the book, but really, if 30 is in the range of the viscosities go for it. Personally, I'd make sure there is a 10 in the multigrade spec given the low operating temperature.



BTW, on page it says the thermostat begins to open at 42C and is fully open at 52C, and the cooling water is maintained at that level. Have you checked the thermostat?
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Old 08-20-2018, 03:34 PM   #28
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Have you tried the interweb???

https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/p/...FcNgwQodussJTg
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Old 08-20-2018, 03:56 PM   #29
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Oil

I have CAT 3116 diesels--vintage 1994. The manual specifies single viscosity 30wt or 40wt, and explains briefly that the multi-viscosity oils have undesireable additives for this motor.
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Old 08-20-2018, 04:31 PM   #30
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(...)Has anyone, at any time in their life, of the dozens and dozens of motors we have all owned over the years in various vehicles and machines, ever had one fail because they used incompatible oil?(...)

Yes I have, many times. In fact, I just finished rebuilding a Honda BF60 that seized the #1 crank bearing due to poor oil selection. That being said, you can pour pretty much *any* lipid into a Yanmar HM, and it'll keep on clacking and rattling and smoking like it used to.
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Old 08-20-2018, 04:31 PM   #31
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See the Cox Engineering - Oil for Yacht Eng's article on the (highlighting my addition)

BACCHUS Nautical Links Page

It's the best article for marine applications I've seen. SO many others are relative to OTR use with emission controlled engines.
I prefer the single wt oils but boat only in summer season so no cold start concerns. Looks like you are in a different location / situation. I'd follow eng mfg recommendations. I have noted Yanmar updated API specs recommended from what was published when my boat was new so I go with the updated recommendations.
I try to avoid the latest multi-grade API rating oils that are designed for OTR as mentioned above.
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Old 08-20-2018, 05:07 PM   #32
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Lou, if 15-40 is a mfr. approved oil, why not use it. Lots of engines do, and it`s readily available.
Only one reason Bruce.
One quart of straight weight oil has more oil in it than multi-vis.
Oil is what lubricates your engine parts.
You don’t need mv oil in your boat engine unless it’s a fireboat.
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Old 08-20-2018, 05:24 PM   #33
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I have CAT 3116 diesels--vintage 1994. The manual specifies single viscosity 30wt or 40wt, and explains briefly that the multi-viscosity oils have undesireable additives for this motor.
Yes,
If you don’t need them or wouldn’t benefit from then use straight wt oil. I’ll bet engine manufacturers of stationary engines that don’t need to work while not warmed up use straight wt. oil. I worked in a powerhouse in Alaska w a 1400hp engine (main) that had a 300 gal pump sump. Delo 30wt. And a warm up of 24 hrs. That is the lube oil and coolant was heated and circulated throughout the engine for 24hrs before startup.
Our trawler engines operate and start in mild temps. Also most all warm up slowly and have no need for mv oil.
Some think the lower viscosity of mv oil when initially started benifits from the flow capabilities. I do not.
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:16 PM   #34
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The question earlier about the engine's age is an important one. Oils have evolved quite a bit over the decades, and each new oil standard (API rating) is backwards compatible with previous standards. So in general, a modern 10W-30 oil is a suitable replacement for any straight weight oil from 10W to 30W. There are exceptions, but they are just that - exceptions.


And related to this, I have to wonder.... We get all worked up over what type of oil to use. Brand, weight, multi vs straight, etc. It's as bad as filter micron ratings and anchors. So I have to ask. Has anyone, at any time in their life, of the dozens and dozens of motors we have all owned over the years in various vehicles and machines, ever had one fail because they used incompatible oil?


Personally, I have never had a failure, or even heard of a failure that traces back to the wrong oil selection. And strictly my opinion - I think fretting over oil selection is one of the biggest non-issues in the world of engines. I think any reputable brand meeting an industry specification called for in your manual, or backwards compatible with your manual, is just fine. Then start the engine, and use it.

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Old 08-21-2018, 06:42 PM   #35
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Twistedtree & Todd 727

"Personally, I have never had a failure, or even heard of a failure that traces back to the wrong oil selection. And strictly my opinion - I think fretting over oil selection is one of the biggest non-issues in the world of engines. I think any reputable brand meeting an industry specification called for in your manual, or backwards compatible with your manual, is just fine. Then start the engine, and use it."

Read through the linked Cox Eng - Oil for Yacht Eng's.

Anecdotal example of modern oil attributed at least as a partial cause of engine problems and substantiated by Yanmar & Shell.

Many / most of the oil reports available are not specific to boats - this one is and I tend to put more faith in it than the trucker type analysis / comparisons.
I have very a different opinion re the oil I use in my motorhome Cummins engine.


I realize everyone is entitled to their own opinion and conslusion.
My effort is to get what I feel is good info in front of others so they can make their own educated decisions.
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:44 PM   #36
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Yeah, I found the Rotella, I can order it on Amazon. It does not come in 20 wt though and that is Yanmar's original recommendation for my engine and environmental temps. I did read somewhere a recommendation to use a heavier weight oil in older "worn" engines than originally spec'd.
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:47 PM   #37
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This is a bit like discussing anchors.
Since oil was first used for lubrication, I believe there have been advances in formulation of lube oils.
Which is why I use multigrade oil.
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:49 PM   #38
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This is a bit like discussing anchors.
Since oil was first used for lubrication, I believe there have been advances in formulation of lube oils.
Which is why I use multigrade oil.
What grade do you use to lubricate your anchor?

L
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:53 PM   #39
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What grade do you use to lubricate your anchor?

L
Good one... and by the way how big is your anchor.
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:56 PM   #40
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What grade do you use to lubricate your anchor?

L
No moving parts in a Sarca . Unlike a plough.

Does anyone lube the hinge on a plough? It`s certainly possible.
There are people who love ploughs, danforths, etc and will have nothing else, lubed hinge or not. And others who think anchor design has moved on and improved on older designs. Some of each group regards the other as heretic.
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