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Old 06-06-2018, 09:02 AM   #41
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You would think nothing of parking your car all winter in New England without changing the oil before and / or after. What’s different? One reason for getting any engine up to operating temp is to boil off moisture internally and externally. Unless someone or something is pouring water into your crankcase you are fine.
What is different, is its a boat, and marinas convince boat owners to spend their money at the marina, in this case by scare tactics, seeing a marine engine is a pricey piece of technology, people weigh the cost-benefit in their heads and some do trust what these 'experts' tell them.
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Old 06-06-2018, 10:54 AM   #42
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well, parking a car all winter without ever driving it...how many do that?

another car to boat comparison that I'm not sure works completely.
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Old 06-06-2018, 11:19 AM   #43
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well, parking a car all winter without ever driving it...how many do that?

I do and a lot of people doing it up here.

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Old 06-06-2018, 01:53 PM   #44
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Most cars are gasoline , so the choke plate and throttle plate should slow down a breeze.

The muffler and cat converter would also slow the breeze.

Changes in atmospheric pressure would be only air motion , and might no be enough to refresh water vapor in the cylinders.
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Old 06-06-2018, 04:49 PM   #45
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Most cars are gasoline , so the choke plate and throttle plate should slow down a breeze.

The muffler and cat converter would also slow the breeze.

Changes in atmospheric pressure would be only air motion , and might no be enough to refresh water vapor in the cylinders.



choke plate and throttle plate ?
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Old 06-06-2018, 05:02 PM   #46
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Oil Analysis ..... not all it's cracked up to be.
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Old 06-07-2018, 05:27 AM   #47
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"choke plate and throttle plate ?"


Inside a carburetor , usually closed while not underway.
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Old 06-07-2018, 05:42 AM   #48
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"choke plate and throttle plate ?"


Inside a carburetor , usually closed while not underway.





Did them old fashion cars have them ?
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Old 06-07-2018, 06:24 AM   #49
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well, parking a car all winter without ever driving it...how many do that?

another car to boat comparison that I'm not sure works completely.
"well, parking a car all winter without ever driving it...how many do that?

another car to boat comparison that I'm not sure works completely."

Some do. I have. Farm tractors by the thousands
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Old 06-07-2018, 07:37 AM   #50
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anectdotal evidence is nice, but usually everyone changes their minds when a little scientific proof is brought up....

when the comment was made about marine engine manufacturers suggesting changing oil again in the spring...I was looking for some science, not cars and tractor winter habits....conditions are not always the same between driveways, barns and bilges....even in the same town. Nor even similar boat situations...

but like most, I was always a Fall oil changer and Spring start and go type.

I like to hear better ideas about old habits, they just need a bit of meat on their bones either way.
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Old 06-07-2018, 07:56 AM   #51
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I tend not to worry about how old the oil is in a machine in terms of calendar time. But whether gas, diesel, road or marine, I make a point of making sure engine runs fairly hard under load prior to going to storage. This is to cook out any moisture from the oil.

Storing with dry oil, no worries.

Storing with oil that has moisture in it, trouble.

My pickup truck (gas) often sits in the garage for a month if I am on a trip or otherwise not needing it. Before I park it the last time, it goes on an at least 15mi trip to run chores, with at least some at highway speeds. Then in the garage to sleep. Since I don't drive it much, sump oil might be in there three years before a change. Looking at valve gear through the oil fill hole, valve gear is still nice and clean.

Worst thing are these guys with classic cars that crank them up and idle them around all the time, then let them sit. Engines get nasty.

And Detroit Diesel guys need to be particularly careful with storage due to the unique two stroke flow path. Can rust liners way quicker than a four stroke.
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Old 06-07-2018, 08:07 AM   #52
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"And Detroit Diesel guys need to be particularly careful with storage due to the unique two stroke flow path. Can rust liners way quicker than a four stroke."

True , but after the gasket on each air box cover is renewed spraying INTO each cylinder is a simple 1 bolt R&R and a can of fogging fluid. A few min and a $5.00 can of fogging fluid will last almost a decade.

Only hassle is on first out of storage start , it will kill flying bugs for 5 miles!
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Old 06-07-2018, 08:10 AM   #53
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The oil itself won't break down, after all it is millions of years old (unless you use synthetic). However, the additives could deteriorate and the oil will pick up moisture and become acidic. I would look at it by pulling the dip stick and wiping it on a white paper towel. If the oil looks new you are likely good to go. If it is black (carbon accumulation) a change would be a good idea.
With Bay Pelican's Lehman 135 the oil looked black after 1 hour of operation.
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Old 06-07-2018, 08:14 AM   #54
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"With Bay Pelican's Lehman 135 the oil looked black after 1 hour of operation."

This is because the modern full flow oil filter does a poor job of filtering the fines.

A second bypass oil filter will mostly solve the problem.

Here is one style,

https://www.dieselcraft.com/engine-oil-cleaning/
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Old 06-07-2018, 08:19 AM   #55
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"And Detroit Diesel guys need to be particularly careful with storage due to the unique two stroke flow path. Can rust liners way quicker than a four stroke."

True , but after the gasket on each air box cover is renewed spraying INTO each cylinder is a simple 1 bolt R&R and a can of fogging fluid. A few min and a $5.00 can of fogging fluid will last almost a decade.

Only hassle is on first out of storage start , it will kill flying bugs for 5 miles!
If you fog a DD through the airbox, AND bar it over to fog all holes, you are doing it right.
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Old 06-08-2018, 06:07 AM   #56
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"AND bar it over to fog all holes, you are doing it right."

Way too lazy to bar by hand !!,

I bump the starter to get the pistons out of the way.
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