Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-14-2024, 10:57 PM   #101
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 18,737
mncruiser,
Re your #1 post it seems your problem is setting. I’ve said on TF for many years setting is the most important aspect of anchor performance.

An old school Danforth w forged shank and flukes is excellent. You’d need to find one used tho and most Danforth anchors used are the cheaper types using sheet metal/plate for flukes and shank. If you find one cheap or free that’s not bent try it. You’ll frequently find cheap used old anchors on CL. The cheaper Danforths may show you the capabilities generally of the Danforth in sand. If you have weed in your anchorages don’t bother w any Danforth.

Another excellent setting anchor is the Super Sarca. You can bolt off the slot but I’d recommend using it. I don’t know if you can do better for setting w any other anchor. This is my go to anchor when I don’t know what’s down there too.

For really good holding power and good setting the Fortress is super. It’s basically a Danforth design made of aluminum. If it dos’nt fit on your bow pulpit storing it flat on the fwd deck is a tried and proven solution. If you bend it straighten it and use it. But if bent quite a bit straighten it and buy a new one and keep the old straightened one as a spare.

A tip .. Basically a good sand anchor has a large fluke area. The Manson Boss may be a good one. Large fluke area for their weight. I spoke w a skipper in Sitka Ak. that has had lengthly experience w the Boss and has good reports.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2024, 11:00 AM   #102
Guru
 
City: Newport, R.I.
Vessel Name: Hippocampus
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 3,844
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
mncruiser,
Re your #1 post it seems your problem is setting. Iíve said on TF for many years setting is the most important aspect of anchor performance.

An old school Danforth w forged shank and flukes is excellent. Youíd need to find one used tho and most Danforth anchors used are the cheaper types using sheet metal/plate for flukes and shank. If you find one cheap or free thatís not bent try it. Youíll frequently find cheap used old anchors on CL. The cheaper Danforths may show you the capabilities generally of the Danforth in sand. If you have weed in your anchorages donít bother w any Danforth.

Another excellent setting anchor is the Super Sarca. You can bolt off the slot but Iíd recommend using it. I donít know if you can do better for setting w any other anchor. This is my go to anchor when I donít know whatís down there too.

For really good holding power and good setting the Fortress is super. Itís basically a Danforth design made of aluminum. If it dosínt fit on your bow pulpit storing it flat on the fwd deck is a tried and proven solution. If you bend it straighten it and use it. But if bent quite a bit straighten it and buy a new one and keep the old straightened one as a spare.

A tip .. Basically a good sand anchor has a large fluke area. The Manson Boss may be a good one. Large fluke area for their weight. I spoke w a skipper in Sitka Ak. that has had lengthly experience w the Boss and has good reports.
Currently using a fortress and a Vulcan. Other than very loose mud soup the fortress has stayed in the bag. Folded up itís easy to store. Only problem is itís better to assemble it and attach it before getting to the anchorage. We only have one roller so getting the Vulcan off is a PIA. When I get some boat bucks want to rework that set up to have two rollers, then will hang the fortress off the pulpit and will only have to connect it and drop it to anchor.
Hippocampus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2024, 08:14 PM   #103
Senior Member
 
City: N/A
Join Date: Apr 2022
Posts: 158
And to add to what has already been said...
When determining scope it is water depth plus height of bow off water plus height until high tide!
So if you are only in Lake Superior, where there is no tide per se, then disregard.
But if ever in a tidal area that additional math is critical if you anchor at low tide and then experience a 10 foot increase (or more) later.
If windy I rarely use engines to back down but instead let the windage of the boat work on stretching the scope out.
Don't start dropping until you are dead stopped and starting to get blown backward.
Then pay out as boat drifts back on its own.
Once you think you are set, take bearings off fixed points on land and sit back and relax and check those later to confirm if you are firm.
And speaking of water depth and tide again, my understanding of the Great Lakes is while there might not be tide per se you can get wind driven water level fluctuations, right?
So if the forecast calls for a wind shift in the middle of the night that may push more water your direction then consider that additional scope too.
Mac G is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2024, 09:48 PM   #104
Senior Member
 
City: Wadsworth
Vessel Name: Mar Azul
Vessel Model: 1977 Hatteras 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2022
Posts: 459
I downloaded the the full size patterns for the Vulcan 33KG and Rocna 33kg and cut out wood patterns. Going to the boat tomorrow to try them.
PierreR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2024, 08:56 AM   #105
Guru
 
City: south kingstown
Vessel Name: Albatross
Vessel Model: 1973 Grand Banks 36
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 597
I haven't followed the entire thread, but the comments on the Danforth design are right on. I had a Fortress storm anchor some years back (Wish I kept it when I sold the boat). The holding power of a Danforth design is great, especially in sand over that of a plow design.
ronobrien is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2024, 09:06 PM   #106
Senior Member
 
City: Wadsworth
Vessel Name: Mar Azul
Vessel Model: 1977 Hatteras 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2022
Posts: 459
Vulcan it is, the Rocna MKii won't fit.
PierreR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2024, 03:32 PM   #107
Senior Member
 
City: Long Beach Ca
Vessel Name: Freebird
Vessel Model: 1997 Mainship 350
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 464
I have a 1997 Mainship 350. Same boat as yours. I use a genuine Bruce 44lb anchor. I have 100ft of 5/16 chain and 300ft of 5/8 three strand Nylon rode. The Bruce usually sets in one anchor length. I usually drop my anchor in reverse for a few seconds during the drop so that the anchor chain doesn't bunch. The slow reverse drift sets the anchor right away letting out the scope I am choosing and bring the boat to a gentle stop. I let is sit for about 10 minutes to let it settle in and set then I use reverse throttle to do the finial set starting at low and slowly increasing the throttle till I feel that the anchor is set. usually my wife has her foot on the road feeling for anchor bounce indicating that the anchor is dragging and not set. Really never a problem for a genuine Bruce of this size with our boat.

FYI the Bruce fits our bow roller perfectly and self launches.
jclays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2024, 04:05 PM   #108
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,812
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclays View Post
I have a 1997 Mainship 350. Same boat as yours. I use a genuine Bruce 44lb anchor. I have 100ft of 5/16 chain and 300ft of 5/8 three strand Nylon rode. The Bruce usually sets in one anchor length. I usually drop my anchor in reverse for a few seconds during the drop so that the anchor chain doesn't bunch. The slow reverse drift sets the anchor right away letting out the scope I am choosing and bring the boat to a gentle stop. I let is sit for about 10 minutes to let it settle in and set then I use reverse throttle to do the finial set starting at low and slowly increasing the throttle till I feel that the anchor is set. usually my wife has her foot on the road feeling for anchor bounce indicating that the anchor is dragging and not set. Really never a problem for a genuine Bruce of this size with our boat.

FYI the Bruce fits our bow roller perfectly and self launches.
We carried the same anchor on our 36' sailboat for 20 years. It dragged twice, once in Hospital Bay (mud) and once off Lahaina (sand). The problem with lighter weight Bruce anchors IMO is that they don't really keep digging into the seabed. They seem to reach a point of penetration, and after that, act like a plow if pulled on hard enough. That was certainly the case in Hawaii, as there was deep sand, and I could see the anchor just below the surface merrily scooting along as the boat dragged downwind.


A true 'diving' anchor, again IMO, like an Ultra, Excel or Danforth style will keep digging until the boat stops. I spoke with a Coast Guard cutter who had to cut their Fortress loose off the south end of San Juan Island because it had dug itself so far in even their powerful windlass couldn't raise it.
__________________
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handey
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2024, 08:01 AM   #109
Member
 
City: Minneapolis, MN - Bayfield, WI
Vessel Model: Chris Craft Catalina 480
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 9
9 months after the fact... (In case you did not resolve the setting issue last summer) I was wondering if your Rocna isn't landing on the bottom inverted? Your anchor doesn't have a "roll bar" as some of that type do. You and I drop anchor in the same places and my 45 lb CQR bites hard on the bottom every time and with only a 3 to 1 scope. The water is usually clear enough that you might try getting a visual on the anchor after it lands on the bottom and before trying to set it.
sealandsky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2024, 01:14 PM   #110
Senior Member
 
City: Long Beach Ca
Vessel Name: Freebird
Vessel Model: 1997 Mainship 350
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 464
I've found a Genuine Danforth that is stamped "Danforth Navy 1941" I has broader Flukes not the long tapered ones. These are more tear dropped or leaf shaped as it goes back from the point . Its a 30 pounder. Should be a nice backup anchor for my 39' Mainship 350. Have you seen these ones? They don't come up to often.
jclays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2024, 01:20 PM   #111
Guru
 
Moonfish's Avatar


 
City: Port Townsend, WA
Vessel Name: Traveler
Vessel Model: Cheoy Lee 46 LRC
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,570
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclays View Post
I've found a Genuine Danforth that is stamped "Danforth Navy 1941" I has broader Flukes not the long tapered ones. These are more tear dropped or leaf shaped as it goes back from the point . Its a 30 pounder. Should be a nice backup anchor for my 39' Mainship 350. Have you seen these ones? They don't come up to often.
A classic! Wonder just how many times that anchor has hit the sea floor in its lifetime...
__________________
Darren
m/v Traveler - '79 Cheoy Lee 46 LRC, Port Townsend, WA
https://www.boatertested.com
https://www.theboatgeeks.com
Moonfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2024, 03:15 PM   #112
Senior Member
 
Snapdragon III's Avatar
 
City: Kenmore
Vessel Name: Snapdragon
Vessel Model: Custom 56' Skookum trawler
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 354
It's always backing up too fast at the very beginning.
Snapdragon III is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2024, 09:28 AM   #113
Senior Member
 
mncruiser's Avatar
 
City: Bayfield
Vessel Name: Phoenix
Vessel Model: Mainship 390
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 343
Quote:
Originally Posted by sealandsky View Post
9 months after the fact... (In case you did not resolve the setting issue last summer) I was wondering if your Rocna isn't landing on the bottom inverted? Your anchor doesn't have a "roll bar" as some of that type do. You and I drop anchor in the same places and my 45 lb CQR bites hard on the bottom every time and with only a 3 to 1 scope. The water is usually clear enough that you might try getting a visual on the anchor after it lands on the bottom and before trying to set it.
Apologies for the late reply, the loss of the mobile app has made my visits here less frequent.

My problem was not enough scope. It was me, all along!

Previous to being back up on Lake Superior I boated on the Mississippi and St. Croix rivers. Smaller boat, shallower water...MUD, made anchoring easy and I thought I was good at it. Turns out I was not!

I think I have the right anchor for most of my anchoring. I was not putting out enough scope, I don't have a good system on the rode to track the emounbt I have out, fixing that this spring.

Thanks all for the discussion and replies.
mncruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2024, 02:31 PM   #114
Member
 
City: Minneapolis, MN - Bayfield, WI
Vessel Model: Chris Craft Catalina 480
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 9
One additional detail is how much chain you have. If just a short lead, you may want to consider a longer length of chain.
sealandsky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012