Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-18-2021, 11:12 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
City: Long Beach Ca
Vessel Name: Island Hopper also, Freebird
Vessel Model: 1966 Californian, also 1997 Mainship 350
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 283
Extending your anchor rode while anchored

What knot, 5/8 three strand to 5/8 three strand would you use if you where anchored, Ground tackle deployed to it maximum and you needed to add more line to get more scope? Bowline to bowline knots? Adding say another 100ft or so.
__________________
Advertisement

jclays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 11:15 AM   #2
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 23,300
Bowline to bowline.....


Used them exclusively when tying assistance towlines together. Had them melt in place from pulling rather than fail or being unable to untie (except from the melted parts which would happen in almost any knot of hitch where friction happens).
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 11:45 AM   #3
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,145
Back to back bowlines with a safety on each one.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 11:54 AM   #4
FWT
Senior Member
 
City: Centreville
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Comodave View Post
Back to back bowlines with a safety on each one.
Have to ask. What do you mean by a "safety"?
FWT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 11:59 AM   #5
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,145
Bowlines are a great knot but if you want to be absolutely sure that it won’t come undone in a loaded/unloaded situation I use a safety. If it will be under constant load it won’t come undone. But loaded and then unloaded repeatedly it might come undone. Leave the bitter end long enough to put a half hitch around the side of the bowline loop and snug the half hitch tight. That is the safety.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 12:10 PM   #6
Guru
 
cafesport's Avatar
 
City: Miami
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 641
Rosendahl aka zeppelin bend was created for just that purpose. Easier and faster to tie, won’t jam or slip and easy to untie.
__________________
Via iOS.
cafesport is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 12:21 PM   #7
Guru
 
Dougcole's Avatar
 
City: Carrabelle, FL
Vessel Name: Morgan
Vessel Model: '05 Mainship 40T
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,735
Two bowlines would be my choice as well. I would use a double fisherman if I wasn’t going to untie it.
Dougcole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 12:36 PM   #8
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,145
Quote:
Originally Posted by cafesport View Post
Rosendahl aka zeppelin bend was created for just that purpose. Easier and faster to tie, won’t jam or slip and easy to untie.
I don’t know about faster. I can tie a bowline in about 1 second with 2 hands. With 1 hand it takes me about 4 seconds. I can tie it behind my back and in the dark just as easily, but then I used to teach marlinspike.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you aren’t one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 12:40 PM   #9
Guru
 
AlaskaProf's Avatar
 
City: Tacoma, WA & Ashland, OR
Vessel Name: SEEADLER
Vessel Model: RAWSON 41
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,470
Quote:
Originally Posted by FWT View Post
Have to ask. What do you mean by a "safety"?

zip-tie.
AlaskaProf is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 12:46 PM   #10
Guru
 
cafesport's Avatar
 
City: Miami
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 641
I didn’t teach marlinspike, but like you I can tie a bowline in 1 sec. two bowlines with two securing half hitches is going to take at least four seconds. This bend only takes one second.
__________________
Via iOS.
cafesport is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 01:19 PM   #11
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,562
As Scott mentioned about the lines melting, you have to be mindful of the chafe factor. You can put a length of some of that velcro-ed chafe protection in each loop, or double up the loops. Having your spare rode rigged with an thimble at one end is another concept and quicker.

A "safety" is achieved via a double bowline knot (not the same things as doing the above).
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 02:08 PM   #12
Guru
 
Giggitoni's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo, California
Vessel Name: Mahalo Moi
Vessel Model: 1986 Grand Banks 42 Classic
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,988
One of the “bend” knots will usually work well and evenly distribute potential chaffing and load; characteristics two bowlines won’t achieve. Sheet bend comes to mind.
__________________
Ray
"Mahalo Moi"
1986 GB-42 Classic
ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑβΕ
Giggitoni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 02:36 PM   #13
Member
 
City: Basking Ridge
Vessel Name: Still Looking
Vessel Model: Donelle 35
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by FWT View Post
Have to ask. What do you mean by a "safety"?

A Safety Knot - "Stopping the knot is a practice that terminates the end of the rope to the base of the knot. When a knot is tied there will be a tail of rope (bitter end) coming out of the knot (if the knot is an end knot). When the rope is loaded, the end or tail of the rope will want to move back into the knot. If there is not a long enough end, it may enter the knot, causing the knot to unravel. It is common practice to have 8″ to 12″ (20.3-30.5 cm) of the end extending from the base of the knot to which a stopper knot can be tied. The stopper knot is not load-bearing; it is merely a finishing knot to secure the end of the initial knot. If there is plenty of rope coming out of the base of the knot, the knot will be safe with or without the stopper knot. Stopper knots are a good practice, and the stopper knot will also assist in managing the end of the rope from tangling with other components."


This is said better than I could but we use safety knots to ensure the end does not slip and cause the knot to un-knot... often just a half hitch
LovetoBoat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 02:45 PM   #14
DDW
Guru
 
City: San Francisco
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 1,573
Zeppelin bend or Carrick bend. Either are more secure that a bowline. Both will be able to be untied even if you break the rode.
DDW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 03:45 PM   #15
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 23,300
Quote:
Originally Posted by DDW View Post
Zeppelin bend or Carrick bend. Either are more secure that a bowline. Both will be able to be untied even if you break the rode.
Secure or stronger?
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 04:04 PM   #16
Guru
 
Giggitoni's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo, California
Vessel Name: Mahalo Moi
Vessel Model: 1986 Grand Banks 42 Classic
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,988
Stronger, and hence, more secure!
__________________
Ray
"Mahalo Moi"
1986 GB-42 Classic
ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑβΕ
Giggitoni is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 04:24 PM   #17
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,562
I just re-read the OP. Make sure you have both the deployed anchor line and the extension well secured before embarking on joining the two. Consider attaching some sort of float to the original rode in case the join fails if you are the belt and suspender type.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 08:02 PM   #18
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber prawn trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 3,328
If you were prepared in advance a spliced eye with Galv thimble at the ends would be my choice.
Simply join with oversized soft or hard shackle
Simi 60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 08:42 PM   #19
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 23,300
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giggitoni View Post
Stronger, and hence, more secure!



Wikipedia...


"A rope with a bowline retains approximately 2/3 of its strength, with variances depending upon the nature of the rope, as in practice the exact strength depends on a variety of factors."


"Although the carrick bend has a reputation for strength, some tests have shown it to be as weak as 65% efficiency."


Sound pretty close to me....
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 11:38 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
City: Long Beach Ca
Vessel Name: Island Hopper also, Freebird
Vessel Model: 1966 Californian, also 1997 Mainship 350
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 283
Double bowline is my choice also leaving long tag ends and tucking them back in several times into the strands of the rope.
Knot chafe not an issue. Knots will be under water.
__________________

jclays is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×