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Old 01-26-2018, 11:43 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Moonfish View Post
I've never used a dual lever control set up that way. That would mess me up in a hurry!
Usually, you want the throttles together, so you can throttle up/down with one hand, and have some semblence of sync. The fisherman style demands two hands.

IMagining a fast reflex to avoid an obstacle. One hand to manage power reduction the other to spin the wheeel. If you demand both hands to power down, you will still go straight ahead.

Multiengine sixed wing aircraft, even more so.
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Old 01-28-2018, 06:47 AM   #22
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Our GB had dual controls, the Ocean Alexander has single lever. The OA will take some getting used to. On the GB I would rest palm on the knobs and operate from there. The single lever seems "looser", maybe smoother is a better word. I need to learn to rest my hand at the bottom of the levers and operate with my thumb and finger. And PAY ATTENTION TO THE DENTENT! 1st time I drove it, I was pulling it into the haul out slip at Cay Marine, under the stern of an island freighter docked at the facility just up river. Really tight with the freighter looming overhead; I put the starboard engine into gear like I was handling the GB. OOPS! Started to spin the stern towards the freighter to starboard and the bow towards the concrete finger with the starboard engine at about 1800 rpm. Managed to catch it before disaster struck but needed to change my underwear and clean up the deck afterwards.
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Old 01-28-2018, 08:23 AM   #23
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The original poster stubones99 didn't say if his was a single or dual (or more) station boat.
For a dual station boat dual lever mechanical controls are simple and common and work very well.
For a dual station single lever controls, if mechanical, involve a "transfer box" which add complexity and friction. In these installations electronic controls may be a better solution.
For a single station boat its personal preference, either choice has the same length and number of control cables, so reliability and complexity are very similar.
I'm used to both and each have pretty much equal + - features.

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Old 01-28-2018, 08:36 AM   #24
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One thing to note is that single lever electric shift controls like Glendinning, Mathers, etc. have programmable delays before shifting occurs, and that mitigates/prevents harsh shifts with the engine still reved up. Plus the clutches in all the gears I have owned are progressive engagement which reduces the harshness of shifts. And the couple of ZF gears I have owned all say in the manuals that emergency full power reversing shifts are acceptable, but not to make a habit of it.
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Old 01-28-2018, 08:57 AM   #25
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After I fried the tranny in our Albin-25 I changed from single to dual lever control. Prior to that a mechanic had said the cables weren't right. I like the dual controls much better.
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Old 01-28-2018, 09:04 AM   #26
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One of the chrome-plated T-knobs on the Morse control interfered with the new rim on our wheel, so I made round wooden knobs, which better fit the style of the boat.
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