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Old 10-30-2017, 06:46 PM   #21
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Old 10-30-2017, 07:21 PM   #22
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First, use what ever you are comfortable with.

Second, there are two different West additives, I donít remember the numbers, one is off white, itís easy to sand but has no strength. The other looks light brown and is for applications requiring strength but is harder to sand. Both can be mixed so thick that they wonít run. It takes a lot of additive, way more than you think. If you think you put to much additive in, donít add any epoxy, just keep stirring, it will mix. Put tape on the bottom side of the whole and then fill. Over fill and sand after 4 hours. Better to sand between 4 and 8 hours, after 24 the epoxy becomes very hard. This is true with most any epoxy product.
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:09 PM   #23
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Bondo ?
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:19 PM   #24
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MarineTex for me has worked well for many repairs/improvements for us and I like that the color is a very close match to our white!
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Old 10-30-2017, 08:25 PM   #25
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What he said

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Originally Posted by HopCar View Post
Itís WEST Six 10 not G10 that comes in a caulking tube. Sorry.
It is expensive, but it works.
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Old 10-30-2017, 09:03 PM   #26
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MarineTex for me has worked well for many repairs/improvements for us and I like that the color is a very close match to our white!


That is my thinking too.
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Old 10-30-2017, 09:03 PM   #27
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It is expensive, but it works.


Does it do vertical without access to the back to tape?
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Old 10-30-2017, 09:37 PM   #28
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I think the WEST Six10 would be the easiest way to get thickened epoxy into small holes. It's thick enough to stay in the holes but I just thought of a reason it might not work for you. It's not white. It's sort of clear amber.

Here is a description of it's properties: http://epoxyworks.com/index.php/unde...10-properties/

As has been pointed out, it is expensive. The tube is only about half full but that will fill a lot of small holes.
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Old 10-31-2017, 10:04 AM   #29
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Bondo ?
I do a lot of work on my boat with Bondo. Great stuff for cosmetic work, and cheap.

Engineer's Solution:
I would suggest to use a small circular piece of cardboard, just bigger than the hole. Tie a piece of thread through a small hole in the middle, and fold it in half. Push the cardboard through the hole, and use the thread and a toothpick to cover the bottom. Then you can use slightly thickened epoxy to plug the bottom of the hole. Once that has cured a bit, cut the thread, and fill the rest of the hole, using appropriate fillers to make fairing easy.

Complicated, but simple at the same time.
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Old 10-31-2017, 10:48 AM   #30
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you dont say what you want to do with the holes. If you want to mount something small dry wall plastic anchors with the tops cut off will work.
If you want to fill unused holes for cosmetic purposes it will be difficlut to make them blend in. I had that problem after removing some fish rod holders and just put nice SS round head screws in the holes. Looked fine,
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Old 10-31-2017, 11:08 AM   #31
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Marine tex loads easily into a hobby syringe. Mix it up on cardboard, then load it into the barrel with plunger out. Easy peasy.
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Old 10-31-2017, 07:57 PM   #32
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Bondo or other polyester or vinylester based filler/fairing compounds work really well for overhead filling. If you need to thicken any kind of resin or epoxy, use silica or fumed silica. It's inexpensive, and can thicken anything from resin to epoxy to gelcoat. An easy filler for gelcoat dings is gelcoat thickened with fumed silica, add a few drops of wax to make the surface cure hard, then just squeegee the mix onto the prepped surface. The most important step is to make sure the hardener is the correct proportion. Most accurate method is to use a gram scale and weigh it to get the proportion correct. If you're filling holes in a gelcoated surface, the thickened gelcoat will fill the void and provide a sealed surface in one step.

Gelcoat and poly/vinylester materials as well as the hardener have a shelf life, so it's difficult to keep those products on hand for a long time for small repairs. Epoxy has a very long shelf life.

Be careful in using epoxy as a filler or fairing if you plan to gelcoat the repair, as the gelcoat (polyester or vinylester) won't chemically bond to the epoxy and can detach. Not so the other way around, epoxy will bond to poly or vinylester resin without issue. If you use epoxy fairing, the repair should be painted to match surrounding gelcoat.
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Old 10-31-2017, 09:22 PM   #33
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Why use products other than a filler to plug holes?
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Old 10-31-2017, 10:40 PM   #34
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pettit ezfair, awesome, dries white, non sagging even when glopped on in large amounts, and is sandable.

Ill never thicken epoxy again.

https://pettitpaint.com/products/epo...ounds/ez-fair/
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Old 11-01-2017, 05:29 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maerin View Post
Bondo or other polyester or vinylester based filler/fairing compounds work really well for overhead filling. If you need to thicken any kind of resin or epoxy, use silica or fumed silica. It's inexpensive, and can thicken anything from resin to epoxy to gelcoat. An easy filler for gelcoat dings is gelcoat thickened with fumed silica, add a few drops of wax to make the surface cure hard, then just squeegee the mix onto the prepped surface. The most important step is to make sure the hardener is the correct proportion. Most accurate method is to use a gram scale and weigh it to get the proportion correct. If you're filling holes in a gelcoated surface, the thickened gelcoat will fill the void and provide a sealed surface in one step.

Gelcoat and poly/vinylester materials as well as the hardener have a shelf life, so it's difficult to keep those products on hand for a long time for small repairs. Epoxy has a very long shelf life.

Be careful in using epoxy as a filler or fairing if you plan to gelcoat the repair, as the gelcoat (polyester or vinylester) won't chemically bond to the epoxy and can detach. Not so the other way around, epoxy will bond to poly or vinylester resin without issue. If you use epoxy fairing, the repair should be painted to match surrounding gelcoat.
Very good information Steve. Thank you. Please explain the wax. ďadd a few drops of wax to make the surface cure hardĒ

What kind of wax? Sorry for a dumb question.
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Old 11-01-2017, 08:23 AM   #36
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Very good information Steve. Thank you. Please explain the wax. ďadd a few drops of wax to make the surface cure hardĒ

What kind of wax? Sorry for a dumb question.
Not a dumb question at all. Gelcoat won't cure out to its typical shiny hard surface unless it cures in the absence of air. Think of gelcoat sprayed into a mold during construction, it's the 1st layer, then subsequent layers are applied as the hull is fabricated in reverse- from the outside in. The gelcoat surface is designed to stay "active" so subsequent layers chemically bond. The mold is sprayed with a release compound that prevents it from adhering to the mold. With repairs, the gelcoat remains "tacky" unless a mold release is sprayed onto the surface to keep air off. Or, a small amount of wax is mixed into the gelcoat resin to accomplish the same thing. So if you purchase gelcoat, you'll see it "waxed" or not, indicating that the wax is already incorporated into the uncured gelcoat mix, so that gelcoat can be used to spray onto a repair and it will cure out hard so it can be sanded/buffed smooth. If unwaxed gelcoat is used, it will remain tacky, and it can't be buffed. Alternatively, wax can be added (drops) to the gelcoat as it's mixed for application thus reducing the need to keep multiple cans of gelcoat on hand.

Some repair shops also use a hardening agent for repairs, "Patch-Aid", "Duratec", or other brands that thin and harden gelcoat for spraying. Some of these products include wax in some form to promote a hard surface cure. The problem with gelcoat repair is that it's difficult to mix small batches with enough accuracy to insure the gelcoat cures properly and won't yellow or otherwise deteriorate in time that it stands out from the adjacent area.

I've done enough gelcoat spraying on my own boat to know that it's a bit of an art form, particularly when blending to an existing surface! Even an experienced pro can complete a repair that yellows out and looks bad after a year or two, it's simply the nature of the media and trying to match differing formulas. If the repair is over a large enough surface that can be easily delineated from the unrepaired area, it's much easier to spray polyurethane paint, and a better success rate with color match. My gray gelcoat is a real bugger to get to match, since the color can vary slightly in different areas of the hull!
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Old 11-01-2017, 09:33 AM   #37
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Not a dumb question at all. Gelcoat won't cure out to its typical shiny hard surface unless it cures in the absence of air. Think of gelcoat sprayed into a mold during construction, it's the 1st layer, then subsequent layers are applied as the hull is fabricated in reverse- from the outside in. The gelcoat surface is designed to stay "active" so subsequent layers chemically bond. The mold is sprayed with a release compound that prevents it from adhering to the mold. With repairs, the gelcoat remains "tacky" unless a mold release is sprayed onto the surface to keep air off. Or, a small amount of wax is mixed into the gelcoat resin to accomplish the same thing. So if you purchase gelcoat, you'll see it "waxed" or not, indicating that the wax is already incorporated into the uncured gelcoat mix, so that gelcoat can be used to spray onto a repair and it will cure out hard so it can be sanded/buffed smooth. If unwaxed gelcoat is used, it will remain tacky, and it can't be buffed. Alternatively, wax can be added (drops) to the gelcoat as it's mixed for application thus reducing the need to keep multiple cans of gelcoat on hand.

Some repair shops also use a hardening agent for repairs, "Patch-Aid", "Duratec", or other brands that thin and harden gelcoat for spraying. Some of these products include wax in some form to promote a hard surface cure. The problem with gelcoat repair is that it's difficult to mix small batches with enough accuracy to insure the gelcoat cures properly and won't yellow or otherwise deteriorate in time that it stands out from the adjacent area.

I've done enough gelcoat spraying on my own boat to know that it's a bit of an art form, particularly when blending to an existing surface! Even an experienced pro can complete a repair that yellows out and looks bad after a year or two, it's simply the nature of the media and trying to match differing formulas. If the repair is over a large enough surface that can be easily delineated from the unrepaired area, it's much easier to spray polyurethane paint, and a better success rate with color match. My gray gelcoat is a real bugger to get to match, since the color can vary slightly in different areas of the hull!
I'm planning to spray some eroded patches of moulded diamond non-skid in the Spring and found this stuff on line. Says no need for wax. Do you suppose it's already in the can, or is this something different?

FIB 105670 Evercoat One Step Gel Coat - Gelcoats & Repair


By the way, I experienced the non-bond problem with applying paint over hardened/fully cured epoxy following a bottom barrier coat project. The paint began to peel off within months. The solution was to strip off all of the bottom paint, apply an epoxy tie coat (Interlux 2000), and then apply the first coat of new bottom paint while the epoxy was still "thumb print" tacky. This achieves a chemical bond between the epoxy and the bottom paint (according to the Interlux tech specialists I spoke with). Since the epoxy tie coat was curing/closing fairly quickly when I re-did the bottom, I had to divide the task into four sections. That was almost ten years ago and that first layer of guide coat bottom paint is adhering tenaciously. In any case, your point regarding use of epoxy products, particularly in locations where it can be seen is well taken.
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Old 11-01-2017, 09:39 PM   #38
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Says no need for wax. Do you suppose it's already in the can
Yes.
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