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Old 09-22-2023, 04:42 PM   #1
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Anchor Trip Line Technique

i could not find much on-line or in forum searches, so it's time at ask:

What is your preferred method of adjusting the line length on your anchor trip line?

I've tried 4 or 5 different ways of doing it, including just leaving it at the maximum depth expected in the cruising area, but I'm not happy with any of them. Indeed, one of my clever ideas had me swimming under the boat with the Admiral's bread knife cutting out the line wrapped around the prop shaft. (all ended happily, but I ruined a pair of shorts rubbing on the ablative anti-fouling)

I'm busy enough at the bow anyway, dropping the line, setting the anchor watch position, counting rode lengths, telling the Admiral what to do about the boat's position, and so on, that I'd like some simple technique for the trip line deployment.

Suggestions?
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Old 09-22-2023, 04:50 PM   #2
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The best solution is to not use a trip line unless you're anchoring somewhere with lots of junk on the bottom that the anchor may get snagged on. Otherwise, trip lines cause possible headaches and waste space in an anchorage when they aren't absolutely necessary.
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Old 09-22-2023, 04:57 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by rslifkin View Post
The best solution is to not use a trip line unless you're anchoring somewhere with lots of junk on the bottom that the anchor may get snagged on. Otherwise, trip lines cause possible headaches and waste space in an anchorage when they aren't absolutely necessary.
Yep, obviously. But having decided I needed one, what's the best technique?
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Old 09-22-2023, 05:03 PM   #4
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One suggestion may be to withhold the use of a trip line all together. One may ask under what circumstances one needs a trip line for the anchor. I have been sailing for sixty five years and I can only think of a handful of times that I would have liked to have then rigged. Snagging a cable or some heavy industrial trash, getting stuck in big rocks, there are just a few possible scenarios that I can think of where having one rigged before hand would be advantageous.


Why not try to avoid these situations and, if necessary, deal with the stuck anchor. I carry aboard a four foot length of chain with a shackle attached. If I need to free an anchor I would shackle the short chain around the stuck anchor rode and attach it to another line. With the stuck anchor rode shortened up to vertical one can lower the short chain ring down the rode until it drops around the anchor shank. Slack off the stuck anchor rode and take the other line out in a dinghy and you can pull from another direction and free the anchor. Much better than swimming with a knife.


Cheers
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Old 09-22-2023, 05:04 PM   #5
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If you've decided you definitely need one you should know how.

We have anchored every night for 7 years without needing one so have no idea, but could certainly have a guess or would google
https://www.google.com/search?q=anch...-8&bshm=rime/6
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Old 09-22-2023, 05:07 PM   #6
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We have had our anchor gear fouled twice in those 7 years.
A trip line would not have worked as it was the chain wrapped around stuff, not the anchor snagged.
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Old 09-22-2023, 05:42 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by AnsleyS View Post
One suggestion may be to withhold the use of a trip line all together. One may ask under what circumstances one needs a trip line for the anchor. I have been sailing for sixty five years and I can only think of a handful of times that I would have liked to have then rigged. Snagging a cable or some heavy industrial trash, getting stuck in big rocks, there are just a few possible scenarios that I can think of where having one rigged before hand would be advantageous.


Why not try to avoid these situations and, if necessary, deal with the stuck anchor. I carry aboard a four foot length of chain with a shackle attached. If I need to free an anchor I would shackle the short chain around the stuck anchor rode and attach it to another line. With the stuck anchor rode shortened up to vertical one can lower the short chain ring down the rode until it drops around the anchor shank. Slack off the stuck anchor rode and take the other line out in a dinghy and you can pull from another direction and free the anchor. Much better than swimming with a knife.


Cheers
This works. Used it in Newport RI where thereís cables and people have been throwing junk in the water for hundreds of years. Water there is opaque . Donít know how far down it went. But it did save the cost of a diver and waiting for him to show up.
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Old 09-22-2023, 05:49 PM   #8
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In 25 years I've had one instance where I wished we had a trip line (we eventually broke free). We're getting an ULTRA Anchor Ring, which can not only free a stuck anchor, but it also adds weight when lowered down the rode to shorten swing in otherwise crowded anchorages.

That last use I can see us employing, and the first hoping we don't ever need to! However, it appears to be a reasonable technique to free an anchor if we are stuck. (Yes, we sell them in our store...)
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Old 09-22-2023, 06:12 PM   #9
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One suggestion: https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/...30&postcount=5


Another suggestion: https://mvdirona.com/technicalarticl...AnchorBuoy.htm
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Old 09-22-2023, 06:36 PM   #10
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Adding one more: https://www.wavesrx.com/collections/bungee-lines
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Old 09-23-2023, 08:01 AM   #11
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If you have any questions about this system, don't hesitate to ask. Only thing I changed is switching to an orange ball fender. The other advantage when using it in a crowded anchorage is the ability for you and boaters looking to anchor near you, to know where your anchor is.....exactly.

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Old 09-23-2023, 08:11 AM   #12
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In my 30 plus years of boating and anchoring out almost every weekend plus vacations etc., I have never needed a trip line.
Plus they are a tangle hazard in many anchorages.
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Old 09-23-2023, 10:12 AM   #13
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I second ocdís method. Plus, I like knowing exactly where my anchor is when others come into a small anchorage.
I mostly anchor in mud so donít use it all the time, but in rocky areas itís handy.
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Old 09-23-2023, 10:41 AM   #14
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One place I would suggest using one is in the cypress swamp creeks used for anchorages.... unless you get a really good scan of the bottom where you plan to anchor with your "fishfinder" or similar.
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Old 09-23-2023, 10:55 AM   #15
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Rather than a trip line you could install one of these in slim chance you get a fouled anchor. Works well in rocky areas like we have in some places on the West Coast.

https://anchorsaver.com/
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Old 09-23-2023, 11:08 AM   #16
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Rather than a trip line you could install one of these in slim chance you get a fouled anchor. Works well in rocky areas like we have in some places on the West Coast.

https://anchorsaver.com/
Iím a west coast guy and used to frequently anchor near rocks and structure for fishing. After losing a couple anchors over several years, I bought and installed one of these Anchor Savers.

Not long after, I managed to get the anchor stuck, and optimistically followed the procedures. After about 45 minutes of trying to free the connection with gradually increasing tension, I eventually pulled on it hard enough to break the anchor rode (1/2Ē nylong IIRC) and lost all the ground tackle. No idea what didnít work, but I wasnít too pleased with this purchase. Hopefully others have had better luck.
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Old 09-23-2023, 11:24 AM   #17
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I could not sleep well with such a break away device. As we change directions with wind and current, the anchor gets stuck, the boat swings 180 from anchor direction. Is that enough to trigger the release? I want to be awake and aware when the anchor is stuck.
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Old 09-23-2023, 11:30 AM   #18
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I have never needed a trip line.
Plus they are a tangle hazard in many anchorages.
This is my view on them as well. It's poor etiquette to use them in full or small anchorages.

Putting a float to mark your anchor is as obnoxious as trailing a float and line 50 feet behind your boat at anchor. Solipsistic boating.
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Old 09-23-2023, 12:47 PM   #19
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This is my view on them as well. It's poor etiquette to use them in full or small anchorages.

Putting a float to mark your anchor is as obnoxious as trailing a float and line 50 feet behind your boat at anchor. Solipsistic boating.
When I overnight anchor I expect to be able to leave whenever I want. When some solipsistic boater is over my anchor and 30' off my pulpit claiming he has no idea where my anchor is, why should I be stuck waiting for him to leave?

Further, the marker can serve as an indicator when the chain bends around a bottom obstruction indicating the anchor isn't directly ahead of the boat.

Ted
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Old 09-23-2023, 01:01 PM   #20
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This is my view on them as well. It's poor etiquette to use them in full or small anchorages.

Putting a float to mark your anchor is as obnoxious as trailing a float and line 50 feet behind your boat at anchor. Solipsistic boating.
While we do not deploy a trip line, there have been a few times when I wished I had. Last year for example, in a popular/scenic Alaskan anchorage, an approx 80 ft Calif vessel entered around 9pm, dropped their anchor, and proceeded to back down over our rode. Unfortunately, when they were informed, verbal sex commenced on their part. We were at our usual 3 to 1 rode length. Would an anchor buoy have helped, do not know, but it might have saved us from a very unpleasant meeting.
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