Elling E4 Sea-trial thoughts

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Wartowne

Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2019
Messages
24
Location
USA
Hello TF Members!
I have lurked and learned from this forum for several years now, and have enjoyed the banter and witty humor from many throughout that time. I myself am not nearly as wise or knowledgeable and admit I have much to learn!
About us...we are former owners of the beautiful 2008 American Tug 435 "Cow Wrecked" which we were truly proud of and enjoyed immensely. It is the vessel that made us realize we were "Trawler Folk" at heart.
My background is boating, fishing, and scuba diving on the East Coast of Florida where I was born and raised. I went off to college and then to the US Coast Guard where I served aboard the USCGC Sedge WLB402, an Ice breaking buoy tender (decommissioned) and then in Florida as a BM2 SAR Coxswain and Boarding Officer at USCG Station Ponce De Leon Inlet. I mainly operated the venerable 41UTB (also decommissioned) and various RHIB's. I also have flown a variety of aircraft including, fixed wings, gyroplanes, and helicopters, some of which I built myself! :eek:
My wife and I have spent a lot of time bareboat sailing monohulls and sail-cats in the Caribbean, when we weren't enjoying our own "vessel of freedom!"
Recently, we had the good fortune of being able to spend an entire day sea trialing the Elling E4 demo boat in Maryland. This is the same E4 that was at Trawler Fest and others. We had researched Elling as much as one can with the internet, this forum, and by asking around to mentors, The overall consensus was that very few people were even aware of this brand in the USA. From pictures, lots of YouTube videos translated from Russian, and reviews, we traveled to Maryland with a short list of concerns that would be deal breakers if not met.
They were:
Engine access, Mechanical access throughout the boat, Storage space, Access from the pilot house to outside deck, lighting, and feeling "confined" when down below decks...
To get to the point quickly, those concerns were quickly allayed upon inspection and underway operation.
There have been reviews that speak to the handling of the boat, its sea worthiness, and they are all spot on, so I won't get into all of that. One of the best takeaways from the day "at sea" was that there isn't an uncomfortable place to be on the boat! Every settee, couch, chair, bed, helm position, etc is incredibly comfortable and ergonomic. The natural lighting and the way that the design makes you feel "open and airy" is really genius.
Both myself and my wife actually loved the downstairs living area. This was another big departure from typical designs. We both felt it was very spacious, comfortable, offered enhanced privacy from marina neighbors, and was just overall well designed. It absolutely mimics a large monohull sailboat design. That will be a preferential issue for some, but we loved the genius of it all.
The pilot house access and its elevated position is fantastic. While we were moored at the marina, the helm position was almost the same as the 50ft flybridge equipped boat next to us. Ingress and Egress thru the aft pilot house door is also very intelligent. On our tug, with the two pilot house doors open and when the weather was less than beautiful, sea spray and/or rain would come thru those doors. On the Elling, you're at least as close to "on deck" at a moments notice thru the back door, but you never have a drop of water coming in where you don't want it. Again, a very smart design.
Access to almost any system is just lifting up a deck plate or opening a hatch. You are NOT crawling down into a bilge or laz for anything.
Engine access, which is definitely non standard, is very intelligent, even when making underway engine checks. Removing the big door in the gallery is not necessary. You just open an access panel in the master suite. This was a big concern for me until I was actually on the boat and doing it myself. Access to bilge pumps, strainers, HVAC systems etc, is same if not better than the AT435.
Storage, is at least as good as our tug with the extra office/berth, cabinets, drawers, large deck boxes, integrated fender storage, etc. The lazarette on our tug usually was the catch all for all our mooring items, and general water activity stuff, but you also had to crawl way down in there to open and close the black water valve which wasn't fun. The E4 remedies all of that.

There were strange things that we would change about a "stock" Elling and here is a short list of those:
Swap out all the custom small sea water strainers for large Groco strainers, replace any non stainless ball valves with stainless, add a reverso oil change system to all engines and gear boxes, add a sea water pump for an anchor wash down (there is nothing installed there now and there is no lip to catch the inevitable mud that will be all over the deck), and add a prop shaft line cutter.

To sum this up, we fell in love with the Elling E4. It's the perfect compromise of displacement cruise efficiency, 19 knt "get the hell outta here" capability, shallow draft go almost anywhere, Ocean A rated sea worthiness, comfort, and quality of construction. We have loved interacting with Anton at the factory in Holland and Jack, the US rep in Maryland. They are no pressure, hyper accommodating, no BS people and that's the kind of people we prefer. We are working with the factory on a new boat with an extensive list of custom features hopefully to be delivered in March of 2024. :dance:

Will keep you posted! Happy Thanksgiving!��
 

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Welcome aboard. Ok, when do you take delivery?
 
Quick question, for Northern Europe, the PNW or New England it seems a great fit. For the hot sunny Gulf Coast. Hopefully its AC systems are up to the task.

I’ve been on them and like them a lot. I’d view the build quality as equal if not better than the ATs. Volvo power? Your thoughts?
 
The AC system is 36k btu dual chillers that are inverter powered and can run off engine alternator and lithium battery bank without genset running….with the living area design “should” be up to the task…at least that’s what they tell me.

I’m definitely not a Volvo aficionado, so our boat will have a Cummins 8.3 593hp.
The wing engine is a 30hp Volvo so kinda stuck with that one.
 
Congratulations on the purchase!

Years ago, when the Elling was itrodivated, it was a special concept.
Both the ship, the execution and marketing.
It was advertised well in advance without the model being exhibited.
To the last, the ship was shrouded in mist.
You could put the ship together yourself and choose from different packages, and that went very far.
For example, the accompanying crockery consisted of different designs.
It is a strongly built ship made of Twaron fibers, it is a self-aligning ship and one of the few self-aligning ships (pleasure craft) that has actually been tested.

https://youtu.be/N0G7tb80JDw?si=zWT4F0V4PfCQiLac

Friends of ours also have an E4 and are very happy there, currently they live on it.
They make beautiful journeys by sea and are very satisfied with the seaworthiness.
It's not an everyday concept and it's been well thought out.

Greeting

Pascal.
 
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I had a Volvo D6 on a previous boat, and a Cummins QSB on the current one. You made a good choice.
 
It's now the end of November and deliver is March 2024? Are these production boats and yours is well down the production line? Yet you mention a long list of customizations? This doesn't sound even remotely plausible. March 2025 I could believe. Shipping alone will take a month, which means the boat would be complete in Feb 2024. That's 3 months to build a boat, start to finish? I know nothing about the boat itself, but I would drill down on the construction schedule.
 
They happen to have a boat built and nearly ready to ship that is basically how we would have ordered it i.e. Cummins QSL8.3
Items we are adding while still at the yard in Holland are more superficial: Navtronics additions, water maker, underwater lights, hull shield transducers, items mentioned in the first post, custom radar mast, tender stowage etc.
I believe a new build is 12-14 months.
 
I’m definitely a Cummins guy! We had a QSL8.3 540 on the AT435. Great power and efficient cruise. Easy maintenance. Hard to beat!
 
They happen to have a boat built and nearly ready to ship that is basically how we would have ordered it i.e. Cummins QSL8.3
Items we are adding while still at the yard in Holland are more superficial: Navtronics additions, water maker, underwater lights, hull shield transducers, items mentioned in the first post, custom radar mast, tender stowage etc.
I believe a new build is 12-14 months.


Phew, that makes much more sense.


Good luck with the boat, and keep us all posted.
 
Pay serious attention to the air conditioning system. Find a good place for the watermaker other than in the master head. Ditto for battery. Most items accessible in the master head engine room entry are inaccessible. My information may be a bit outdated since I was the US Elling dealer as I have not maintained contact with Anton, but passing along a few of my experienced hints just in case.
 
Pay serious attention to the air conditioning system. Find a good place for the watermaker other than in the master head. Ditto for battery. Most items accessible in the master head engine room entry are inaccessible. My information may be a bit outdated since I was the US Elling dealer as I have not maintained contact with Anton, but passing along a few of my experienced hints just in case.
What should I check on the new boat regarding the HVAC?

The batteries are located in an easy access closet on the demo boat which is laid out the same as the one we are working on.

I was told the water maker mounts under the master bed.


Appreciate any advice you have to give!! Thank you !
 
I’ve spent some time on an older Elling 48. It’s a nice boat and very different from what we’re used to in the PNW. The outdoor living space in the cockpit, sheltered from wind at anchor, is really nice. The biggest shortcomings I noticed were difficult ingress/egress from floating docks and absolutely terrible generator access. I changed the impeller in the genset and had bruises on my chest for a week from the contortions required.
 
The biggest shortcomings I noticed were difficult ingress/egress from floating docks and absolutely terrible generator access. I changed the impeller in the genset and had bruises on my chest for a week from the contortions required.

Yep, the generator is one of the inaccessible issues I had in mind. But, I have to ask if you used the boarding steps built into the hull. I think these hull steps are about the simplest and most brilliant boarding improvements to come along. Wish every boat had them.
 
Would an aft mounted gangway have made the difference at the floating dock?

Can you tell me how the genset was configured in the Elling you were on?

The genset on the demo boat looked accessible except for a large person. (I’m 5-10, 200ish pounds…) I think I could get in the space fairly easily. It was to the left of the master bed, aft and to starboard of the main engine in a mechanical locker with decent empty space and foot holds around it.
 
Would an aft mounted gangway have made the difference at the floating dock?

Can you tell me how the genset was configured in the Elling you were on?

The genset on the demo boat looked accessible except for a large person. (I’m 5-10, 200ish pounds…) I think I could get in the space fairly easily. It was to the left of the master bed, aft and to starboard of the main engine in a mechanical locker with decent empty space and foot holds around it.

The boat had little toe steps for climbing the side, which work okay as long as you are reasonably agile and don’t have an arm full of groceries.

The genset was accessed through a panel in the master. The problem was you couldn’t sit anywhere and reach the impeller. I had to lay on my chest with my legs sticking up into the master cabin and my chest on a threshold. A towel or foam pad probably would have mitigated the bruising. I was in my late-20s and am about your height and it left a lasting, negative memory.
 
The boat had little toe steps for climbing the side, which work okay as long as you are reasonably agile and don’t have an arm full of groceries.

The genset was accessed through a panel in the master. The problem was you couldn’t sit anywhere and reach the impeller. I had to lay on my chest with my legs sticking up into the master cabin and my chest on a threshold. A towel or foam pad probably would have mitigated the bruising. I was in my late-20s and am about your height and it left a lasting, negative memory.
Thanks for the feedback
 
Correction! I was given some outdated info. Sorry about that.

The system installed on the 2024 E4 we are acquiring is the Webasto V50 chiller.
It’s set up to run from the genset, engine alternator underway (no genset) or the inverter and lithium battery bank in “eco mode” for roughly 3 hours.
 
Any chance you can sea trail the boat in the NL and spend time on the boat to get more testing done before shipping to the US?

Later,
Dan
 
That’s definitely on the table as an option.

I would encourage you to test the boat out in the NL before shipping to the US. The Netherlands is a wonderful country and a great place to explore, especially by boat, which would provide ample testing opportunities. :D

We spent a couple of weeks in the NL last spring for vacation and to look at some boats being built. We did not want to leave. :D

The Elling's low air draft and water draft opens up many of the canals in Europe.

You might also want to consider going to the UK when your time is up in the NL. Course, then one could go to Ireland....

Later,
Dan
 
I think it is also wise to use the boat intensively for at least a week.
There are several complex systems on board that may still have teething problems.
You kill two birds with one stone, interesting holiday, test run and the shipyard nearby to solve any shortcomings.
Greeting

Pascal.
 
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Neat boats! Do I recall correctly that you can flip and Elling and it will pop back up?
 
very nice boats, different design, well build
i have workt on the electrical of a elling they have a nice layout, good schematics
i found only the top of the motor hard to access (there is a big wire bundel on top of the motor)

not my type of boat we like to look more outside from the saloon.
but still one eye catching design, we name them the jetson boats (from the jetson cartoon serie, look the rounded design of the cocpit)
 
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Update!
Our boat ships March 18th to Baltimore. Today was the survey! Super happy with how the upgrades have worked out. We are more excited than ever to be part of the Elling family.
 

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