A list of things you need to bring with your Dinghy

The friendliest place on the web for anyone who enjoys boating.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

ctbarbarian

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2016
Messages
99
Location
USA
I'm trying to work up a list for things to bring on my dinghy.
Life jackets, throw cushion
small anchor and 2 ropes.
running lights, flashlight
whistle, fire extinguisher,
oar
please add suggestions to my list.

Also, where do you put all this stuff, when away from the dinghy
eating out or shopping ?
9ft Caribe with a 9.9 Yamaha.
Thanks for any help.
 
Add oars, a portable VHF radio, and maybe a large sponge for water. I'm always amazed by the folks that use their dinghies without anchors or oars aboard. Ever have an OB stop running? "Nuff said.

Cheers, Bill
 
We have a long painter, two oars, a signal device, 2 life jackets, a hand held vhf, and a small tool kit. Our 10.5’ rib has a small bow locker.

Edit: Don't forget a copy of your registration. We got pulled over last year in St. Augustine for speeding. All they wanted to see were the life preservers and registration. They gave us a warning.
 
Last edited:
I think a lot depends on where and how you are using your dinghy. We don't carry PFDs in the dinghy, they are worn by folks in the dinghy. Our dinghy is used primarily for running between our anchored boat an the shore or dock. We have a long painter but certainly no anchor. We keep oars in the dinghy but no VHF.

Keep in mind that most of the time we are less than 200 yards from the shore or boat. Quite a bit different than folks who use their dinghy to explore further afield.
 
I'm trying to work up a list for things to bring on my dinghy.
Life jackets, throw cushion
small anchor and 2 ropes.
running lights, flashlight
whistle, fire extinguisher,
oar
please add suggestions to my list.

Also, where do you put all this stuff, when away from the dinghy
eating out or shopping ?
9ft Caribe with a 9.9 Yamaha.t
Thanks for any help.
Add a signal horn, flares, bailer or hand pump, 2 stroke oil if appropriate, handheld vhf, extra kill switch lanyard and a couple bottles of water. We put that in a small cooler bag that we can carry or leave on board.
 
We have a large cooler on board and it's always filled with towels, sun screen, our inflatable pfd's (until we launch, then we wear them), dock lines, portable VHF, etc. Our paddle fits between the side rail and the hull, the anchor and line in the bow compartment as well as the tow bridle.


The registration and insurance card are in a zip lock baggie that is duct taped to the underside of the hatch cover over the forward stowage compartment.


A place for everything and everything in its place, then there's no tripping over stuff and having stuff bouncing around when we're running.
 
You can fit all that stuff in a small cooler ?

Thanks for adding to my list.
I'd like to do some exploring with the dinghy and
maybe even try to get a bike to fit.
 
Small manual bilge pump.
 
We have a storage bag that attaches to the seat and hangs under the seat.
 
What dinghies require registration?
 
I think a lot depends on where and how you are using your dinghy. We don't carry PFDs in the dinghy, they are worn by folks in the dinghy. Our dinghy is used primarily for running between our anchored boat an the shore or dock. We have a long painter but certainly no anchor. We keep oars in the dinghy but no VHF.

Keep in mind that most of the time we are less than 200 yards from the shore or boat. Quite a bit different than folks who use their dinghy to explore further afield.

We often use our dinghy to access isolated beaches. I now carry a few tools and a spare parts after once getting dumped in the surf, drowning the outboard.
Enough to pull the spark plug and drain the water, or re-pin the prop.
 
Add a bailer (1-gal water jug with the bottom cut out) and a simple hiking compass. We do not carry a fire extinguisher as our plywood dinghy has no motor.
 

Attachments

  • P7080031.JPG
    P7080031.JPG
    148 KB · Views: 103
  • P7140044.JPG
    P7140044.JPG
    147.7 KB · Views: 113
Clearly you need a larger dinghy.

One with: 1 a storage compartment below the helm seat, 2 another in the bow above the fuel tank, 3 a third in the console, possibly 4 a forth under another seat.
In those compartments:
1 Fire extinguisher, air pump, room for spare PFDs
2 Anchor and ample rode, fuel tank key
3 In, on and under the console; more rope, electric horn, GPS, Fishfinder/plotter, VHF, Nav lights, bilge pump
4 CG approved Bailer kit with whistle, heaving line, flashlight. Flares, fishing license in a ziplock, 303, rags, sponge
5 stowed alongside the console, at least 1 paddle
This is what I leave in my 12' Caribe with a 40 Honda. It never leaves my boat without all that stuff and whatever the excursion requires in addition.

My boat is registered, so my dinghy is its lifeboat and does not require separate registration, though the boat name is required to be (and is) clearly displayed. I don't need to (nor do I) carry the boat registration in the dinghy.
 
My Bayliner 3818 is 13ft wide,so I'm not sure I can get
a dinghy much over 10ft but I will be looking.
Also, I still haven't figured out the davit or hoist system.
Your additions to my list is good.
I even own a 12 aluminum Lund which has much more storage
but not sure how much the hard dinghy versus the inflatable dinghy
will work.
I might bring them both, they can both fit.
 
No mention of a lock and chain/cable. Without these in many places you won't have to worry about what is in the dinghy.

In addition to most items mentioned I also carry a replacement for the fuel line connector, two small hose clamps and a double barb connect to patch a fuel hose leak.
 
I think a lot depends on where and how you are using your dinghy.

Bingo. We run to and from the dock/nearby shore. PFDs, oars, copy of registration, and a signaling device (whistle). Running lights if likely to be out after sunset.

(The runnings lights, even though they can flash SOS automatically, don't qualify as VDS because they aren't marked to meet 46 CFR 161 013. But we don't operate outside the "two nautical miles wide" exclusion. Or so I think.)
 
Flares
I always take the old ones (as they go dated) from the big boat and have them on the tender
 
Pardon my lack of knowledge but what is the
2 N mile exclusion ?

Here is where I'm going to get myself in trouble most likely:

33 CFR 175.101: "This subpart applies to boats on the coastal waters of the United States and on the high seas beyond the territorial seas for boats owned in the United States.".

33 CFR 175.110: "Between sunset and sunrise, no person may use a boat less than 16 feet in length unless visual distress signals suitable for night use, selected from the list in § 175.130 or § 175.135, in the number required, are on board."

However, the definition of coastal waters in 33 CFR 175.105 has this proviso: "Those waters directly connected to the Great Lakes and territorial seas (i.e., bays, sounds, harbors, rivers, inlets, etc.) where any entrance exceeds 2 nautical miles between opposite shorelines to the first point where the largest distance between shorelines narrows to 2 miles, as shown on the current edition of the appropriate National Ocean Service chart used for navigation. Shorelines of islands or points of land present within a waterway are considered when determining the distance between opposite shorelines."

Make sense? Not to me either. See page 17 here for a better explanation: https://www.uscgboating.org/images/420.PDF
 
The flares on the tender are likely to be stored in a much more harsh environment than those on the boat, so this is one place you shouldn't let them get too old. Since you are now required, as a condition of moorage , to have a safety check sticker on your boat, that is an opportunity to also get a safety check sticker on your tender. If it is small, it only requires 3 up to date flares.
 
We have a long painter, two oars, a signal device, 2 life jackets, a hand held vhf, and a small tool kit. Our 10.5’ rib has a small bow locker.

Edit: Don't forget a copy of your registration. We got pulled over last year in St. Augustine for speeding. All they wanted to see were the life preservers and registration. They gave us a warning.

We don't put up with scoff laws like you and Lena in our waters:rofl::rofl:
 
<2 miles across you only need one flare instead of three. But why would anyone go down to one when they come in packs of three?
 
My RIB is clearly marked with T/T (tender too) so it carries no state registration.
Do I still need to carry a copy of the "origin"?
 
A quick observation, if one attempts to carry ALL the necessary 'stuff', there may not be room for passengers and groceries.
 
My RIB is clearly marked with T/T (tender too) so it carries no state registration.
Do I still need to carry a copy of the "origin"?

If you're in Florida your RIB needs to be registered and bear state numbers. "Tender to" does work as a technical exemption to registration in some states (Washington, for example), but ONLY if the sole use of the tender is to ferry between the mothership and shore. Florida does not have this "tender to" exemption.

Florida's exemptions are listed below. I doubt that your tender would qualify as a "ship's lifeboat."

  • Non-motor powered vessels less than 16 feet in length.
  • Non-motor-powered canoe, kayak, racing shell or rowing scull regardless of length.
  • Vessels used exclusively on private lakes and ponds.
  • Vessels owned by the U.S. Government.
  • Vessels used exclusively as a ship’s lifeboat.
  • Vessels issued valid registration certificates and numbers by other states, provided the vessel is not stored or operated in state waters more than 90 days.

Source: https://www.flhsmv.gov/motor-vehicles-tags-titles/vessels/vessel-titling-registrations/
 
Last edited:
My tender is a marked T/T to a documented vessel. How does that effect the necessity for a state registration??
 
Back
Top Bottom