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Old 07-15-2020, 12:31 AM   #21
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You will be really overwhelmed!

Overwhelmed at how little water flows given the worry most bring to the idea. Bigger worry is leaving that hard crusty packing in the gland and tightening it in a misguided attempt at getting to the next season. I might work on that stud first, while the packing is keeping things nice and sealed.

I would get the right packing, but here is a little tip if you find that it’s not quite the right size. If you tap the packing with a hammer you can flatten it just a bit, making one side thinner and the other fatter, so you can make it the right fit. Sometimes this effect has already happened in the packaging, so adjust if you like. You want it to go in as close to the right size as possible. It will slide in easily if you do. You want at least 3 rings and an extra ring is allowable if you have the room. Main thing is to not get over zealous as you tighten it the first time. If you go too tight, you cant just release the tension, you will have to pull the rings out, adjust them and put them back in.

Also old packing can get quite hard. Be sure you have it all out before repacking.

Also, get an extra corkscrew tool, or two. If you find rock hard packing, it can be easy to break a tool. Try to pick out small amounts at a time. If you crank it in a long ways, you will be trying to remove multiple rings at once and the tool will fail. Look for an edge, probe with a thin screwdriver. Once you get it started it will go easier.
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Old 07-15-2020, 12:47 AM   #22
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I agree. Mine has 6 layers of packing. I couldn’t even reach the last two with the corkscrew tool. It would go in but wouldn’t turn because of the hex area on the tool was 3/8” and that is the size of packing it takes. So the tool wouldn’t turn and the smaller size tool wasn’t strong enough to pull it out. I got the last 2 layers out when I pulled the back end of the gland off the shaft. I don’t recommend doing that in the water...
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Old 07-15-2020, 05:30 AM   #23
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Maybe PB Blaster or the like, start now dosing it periodically. Maybe heat. Maybe double nut if you can get a nut on the stud, hopefully when you got the old nut off it chased the threads for you. Maybe a combination of all the above along with periodically.tapping to help work the lubricant into the threads on the rear piece of the gland. Maybe it will just back out with vice grips but I wouldn’t go there first because it will screw up the threads.
Comodave has it right - looks like you have plenty of thread to get double nuts on it, which is lucky. And I definitely agree about not going the vice-grip route. Double nut will give you more torque, and as he states, no damage to threads.

Comodave: I have never seen a stuffing box with more than three, maybe four rings of packing. At first, sounded like a good idea - more is better. But after thinking.....I wonder. Is there risk that the inboard rings are running dry and heating-up?

Peter
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Old 07-15-2020, 06:49 AM   #24
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I'm no expert on packing so have nothing to add.
Here's another parallel thread on GB packing that may provide some additional info. It does show dwgs of different glands with different # of rings.

https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/...ad.php?t=52004
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Old 07-15-2020, 07:17 AM   #25
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I have broken a few of the corkscrew packing tools through the years.


I switched over to long, fine thread drywall screws. Screw them in, use vice grips to pull out...the vice grips can be levered against a piece of wood, or hit with a hammer to make it real easy coming out..
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Old 07-15-2020, 08:06 AM   #26
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I have broken a few of the corkscrew packing tools through the years.


I switched over to long, fine thread drywall screws. Screw them in, use vice grips to pull out...the vice grips can be levered against a piece of wood, or hit with a hammer to make it real easy coming out..
Great tip!
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Old 07-15-2020, 08:14 AM   #27
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Number of rings depends a lot on the box. Mine take 5. When I repacked them it looked like 4 would be enough, but they didn't tighten up properly with 4. So I added a 5th ring and they've worked great since (don't get hot, hardly ever drip while stopped, etc.)
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Old 07-15-2020, 10:30 AM   #28
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There appears to be some scale on your shaft and salt on the follower. Wire brush the heck out of everything.

I agree to double-nut the stud, unless you can find a stud puller (the collet type), but I would also heat the flange area of the stuffing box and mechanically agitate both the flange body (radially) and the stud (axially) with a few hammer taps to break the set stud threads free. A little penetrating oil overnight ay help too (I like Kroil). Bronze and SS usually come apart relatively well, but it is likely an interference fit, so it will be tight.

Getting the packing out might be a tough as it looks like it hasn't been serviced or has been over tightened in the past. Have fun with that use patience and take breaks. Use screws, packing pullers, and picks (dental picks if you can get them). It's the worst part of the job.

As there is a cooling/flushing water connection on the box you may find a lantern ring in there too. Old school ones are bronze. Consider fitting a PTFE replacement one that wraps on like a piece of packing. You can buy a chunk that you cut to size and wrap it on like packing. Garlock, John Crane, etc make them. They are way better than the original metal one. If you don't have a lantern ring in there, someone may have already removed it. In this case, the water connection probably doesn't do anything at all as all of the radial clearance for flush flow will be taken up by the packing. Honestly in this application, with modern packing, lantern rings are of negligible value, unless you boat in skinny water with sand intrusion. It is quite common for the old metal ones to be missing, as they are a pain to deal with, and often just wear the shaft.

Chamfer cut the packing to size. If you have a piece of pipe the same size as your shaft that works well. If not, you appear to have enough shaft away from the gland to cut a few pieces. It's not correct, but it is better than having the wrong size packing. Emery cloth out any knife marks you make.

When you put it back together, stagger the rings and slide each piece down as far as you can before put in the next piece. A little water soluble lube works great too. I use a chunk of plastic pipe (well actually I used a nylon hose barb) that I slotted longitudinally. I snap this over the shaft and drive the packing in to the gland with this tool. Highly recommend this. It works great as it gets the packing set straight and tight into the gland.

If the box is radially concentric to the shaft, you shouldn't have to hammer the packing to fit. Instead, support the gland so that it is concentric and not sagging, after all, it is "hanging" on a hose. An easy way of measuring packing size is with a dowel or pencil chunk.

Keep in mind that the packing follower imparts an axial load onto the packing to compress it radially inwards to the shaft and outwards to the stuffing box. The frictional drag makes it so most of the load and therefore compression happens on the ring closest to the follower, and NOT the ring deepest in the gland. This is somewhat counterintuitive. Save your best fitting packing ring for last.

Snug it up and run it. Let the packing break in, heat up and swell a bit. Tighten it slowly, bringing up the gland nuts a flat or half a flat at a time. Most people don't spend enough time letting the packing break in. Once you tighten the packing and compress it, it doesn't "uncompress" or rebound back into shape, if you back off on the gland. Take your time and do it right and modern packing will last a long time.

I like GFO. Real GFO with the letters GFO, printed on the packing.
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Old 07-15-2020, 02:44 PM   #29
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Comodave has it right - looks like you have plenty of thread to get double nuts on it, which is lucky. And I definitely agree about not going the vice-grip route. Double nut will give you more torque, and as he states, no damage to threads.

Comodave: I have never seen a stuffing box with more than three, maybe four rings of packing. At first, sounded like a good idea - more is better. But after thinking.....I wonder. Is there risk that the inboard rings are running dry and heating-up?

Peter
I have not opened the starboard side yet, I am going to pull the starboard engine this winter to do all the routine maintenance and cleanup a lot of things. Rebuilding the stuffing box is on the list so I will see how many layers is in that one. They don’t run hot or drip at all underway or sitting at the dock. The port shaft looked great where the packing rides so it doesn’t appear that having the 6 layers of packing hurts at all. I was surprised when I found that many layers also.
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Old 07-15-2020, 03:23 PM   #30
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Boat I built 35 years ago had a 3 inch shaft.
I used an Easthope stuffing box and stern bearing.
The stuffing box took 13 rings of 1/2 inch packing.
The stern bearing used rubber? rings. The inside looked like a cuttless bearing.
The out side had 2 square tabs that fit into the bronze housing. They were
about 1/2 inch thick. Adjusted them the same way as the stuffing box. .......when adjustment ran out, add another ring. After 2 rings, pull and replace them all
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Old 07-20-2020, 02:56 PM   #31
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And this is where I tell you that on my GB42 I enjoyed the PYI dripless packings.
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