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Old 04-26-2020, 09:03 AM   #1
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Non burning oil?

I have seen boats here in FL have engine problems from lack of use.

The worst are the folks that come once every so often , run the engine for 5 min and think there helping the engine.

The problem seems to be they never really know when they will use the boat again,next week or an a couple of months.

On our DD 6-71 we could spray fogging fluid into the engine and it would shut down with the throttle , and kicking it in gear, although it would run on the fogging fluid. PIA to lift the hatch tho.

Most older engine mfg & suppliers offered a cold start system , a can of ether and a dash push button for a quick shot.

I believe some folks would be willing to purchase a can of fogging oil that did not combust , and install it in the old ether winter start setup.

Gas or diesel with OTS parts , when a days fun is over , a short push could preserve the engine till "next time" comes.

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Old 04-26-2020, 12:09 PM   #2
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I don't like adding fogging oil or ether into a running engine as a matter of course. Although I guess prudent use would be mostly OK.

What will ruin a diesel engine faster than almost any other abuse is to just start it up and let it idle for a long period.

I know the big truckers do it, so do lots of boaters. That doesn't make it right.

Also running fuel, especially in Florida, which is several or many years old will get you into trouble just when you need the engine the most.

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Old 04-26-2020, 02:10 PM   #3
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I run my boat at the marina i maint. mode.
Start and run dead idle several minutes.
Run several five or so minutes at 1100rpm.
Tighten up the spring line if needed, put in fwd gear and run for about 8-10 min at 1400rpm. Sometimes 15 to 20 min. Sometimes for a minute at WOT. That’s overloading the engine though.

Run at idle for 3-5 minutes for cool down.
Before shutdown I shift back and forth fwd and reverse. Don’t ask.
Shutdown and close the seacock.


There’s a longstanding theory about not exercising the engine at the dock. Can’t remember it. Anybody care to refresh my memory?
I think it has to do w oil temp. But w the above exercise I’ll bet if I was to do the above exercise the lube oil would be too hot to pour over my hands. HaHa haven’t tried it though.
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Old 04-26-2020, 02:21 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
There’s a longstanding theory about not exercising the engine at the dock. Can’t remember it. Anybody care to refresh my memory?
I think it has to do w oil temp. But w the above exercise I’ll bet if I was to do the above exercise the lube oil would be too hot to pour over my hands. HaHa haven’t tried it though.

It's definitely about getting oil and combustion temps up. You've got a small engine, so you can safely get some load on it at the dock. A lot of us have enough power that getting load on the engines at the dock would be very risky. Personally, I don't like anything above idle in gear (1 engine at a time) while tied to the dock.

In general, during the season, my engines never really sit for more than 2 weeks, so I don't worry. Even 3 or 4 weeks I wouldn't worry as long as they got good and warm when they were last run. Over the winter, I fog them.
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Old 04-26-2020, 03:51 PM   #5
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Diesels bigger than the usual yacht engine aren't harmed by idling long hours. Most of mine had hundreds, if not thousands of hours idling. And I generally exceed the hours between overhaul that other operators get. In studies I've read, it's worth the time to completely warm a diesel before putting it under load. The warm engine gets better mileage than a cold engine and more than makes up for the fuel spent idling. Some trucks have Webasco type heaters to keep the engine and cab warm, and to keep people from whining in places like California about the engine idling. The funny part is, the auxiliary heater (rarely properly adjusted) usually puts out more pollution than the idling engine.
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Old 04-26-2020, 04:17 PM   #6
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Greetings,
Mr. FF. The first thing that popped into my head when you mentioned non burning oil for fogging is how do you get rid of it on re-start up? Will the diesel flush it out? When the diesel does combust will that create a problematic residue from the not burning oil?
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Old 04-26-2020, 04:27 PM   #7
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My Vetus engine manual suggests running the engine on 10% engine oil, 90% diesel for 10 minutes at idle prior to winter layup. I've never done this as we don't really have a winter.
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Old 04-26-2020, 05:48 PM   #8
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The engine in my boat is older than me by far, sits 6 months a year without running, sat multiple years in storage 15 years ago and never got fogging oil and still running very well. I have a car that sits 6 months during winter and since the last 15 years never had any issue and is still running like new.
Wondering if we don't make engine storage prep more complicated than really needed.

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Old 04-26-2020, 09:52 PM   #9
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On a Detroit you can open the air box and spray whatever you want on the rings.
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Old 04-27-2020, 07:12 AM   #10
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"On a Detroit you can open the air box and spray whatever you want on the rings.'

Sure but that's for putting an engine out of service for a long period of time.

The spray of fogging oil would just be for folks that have no idea weather the boat will be used next day or next month.

The diesel will burn off any fogging oil (there is only a thin film) although lots of smoke comes with after the first start.
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Old 04-27-2020, 04:25 PM   #11
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I don't think you'll find an oil that a diesel won't burn except for bunker oils that have to be heated to burn. But cold, they wouldn't spray. If you're concerned about the rings rusting to the sleeves, an additive in the fuel will prevent this. I use it every fueling. Additives put back in lubrication and combustion efficiency that the EPA took out of present day diesel. It also stabilizes fuel for longer term storage. For me the increased combustion efficiency pays for the additive and less soot ends up in the oil.
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