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Old 01-03-2016, 11:11 AM   #21
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$100 for a rebuild of an injector line?! My goodness, one may purchase brand new lines from American Diesel for $90. Brian could have them shipped to you probably in less time than to have one rebuilt. I know cuz I bought one last year to replace the spare I used to replace the cracked line that I experienced underway in the St. John's River. Sprayed fuel all of the engine. A nice mess to clean up. Fortunately, we had six spare lines aboard.
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Old 01-03-2016, 12:58 PM   #22
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Just remember that if you are messing with hydraulic leaks with the engine running that the pressure is high enough to inject you with fuel too. Very hazardous, be careful.
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Old 08-28-2016, 08:03 PM   #23
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Hello Cal sailors

My original cal cruising 46 hull no 5 came with a Perkins 4.236 engine

For years I could only do max of 14 to 1600 RPM on cruising (6-7 knots)

After much trouble turns out the injectors where clogged or partially clogged

And the marine growth build up in the heatexchanger impeded cruising at higher RPM

cuz of over Heating


NOW that I've got all that resolved, the boat wants to fly

Now I can do 2200 to 2400 RPM in a heartbeat and cruise at 8.5 to 8.7 knots

And water gushes out in the back exhaust like Niagara Falls

What I have discovered now is,

After a 4 hrs trip to Catalina island, (from Marina del Rey ) a mere 28 nautical

Miles away, my engine oil is LOW and requires a top off 1 to 1.5 quarts of oil!

ITS BURNING OIL at much higher rpm

The engine runs smoothly, no overheating no black or blue smoke, good sound

I do see a slight white fog coming out of the exhaust but that may

Be from the coldness of the water and the fact the exhaust spends 1/3 of time

Underwater while cruising

But this oil loss is really annoying and worrisome

The engines runs so well though

The engine hours barely reads 1250 hrs

Had the injector pump and injectors rebuilt last year

The oil and antifreeze is clean, no cross contamination, no visible leak anywhere

Any advise?

I have not tried running at just 15-1600 to see if this persists

Would appreciate any thoughts




Edwin
Cal Cruising 46
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Old 01-17-2018, 10:01 PM   #24
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Great info!!
No leaks now but with 2 and they are now 39yrs old will keep in a file for use if and when a leak develops.
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Old 04-16-2019, 08:34 PM   #25
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Unsure of your plumbing but if you have oil cooler, oil side tube leak sends oil into the shell side water which oil then gets shipped out exhaust with the water.
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Old 07-20-2019, 03:30 PM   #26
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Very useful article! Especially with the part/order numbers and link. I have the Marlin Ford Lees Marine with same pump. Regarding the steel and copper washer, why are both included in the kit and why did you use the steel ones rather than the copper please? Thanks
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Old 01-07-2021, 12:36 PM   #27
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Delivery valves

Nice post Dan. I thought some other background might be of interest. I was a mechanic for Mack Truck years ago, and Mack had 2 mechanical injection pump styles. The American Bosch & the Robert Bosch (German). The Americans you could service the delivery valves on the engine, but there were no crush washers, you had lap the valves in on a lap block to get them to seal. The Robert Bosch could not be done on the engine as removing the delivery valve altered the internal pump timing. These could only be done off the engine so that they could be re-calibrated on a calibration stand. That was unless you had the very special alignment jig that was installed on the valve before removal. The RB pumps were supposed to be better, but we all thought they were a pain in the butt. I just closed on a 1973 GB 36 with twin Lehman 120's, so I am always interested in information regarding them. Again, nice post, thanks for the info. PS anyone know about the pump oil change interval and oil type? Thanks
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Old 01-07-2021, 01:31 PM   #28
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The early advice from American Diesel was to change the pump oil every 50 hours. Bob Smith later changed his advice to as many as 150 hours. I spilt the difference and change at 100 hours.

You should also consider retorquing the cylinder heads and then adjusting the valves. The valves on a FL120 should not be adjusted without first doing the heads. Brian Smith recommends adjusting the valves at no more than 1,000 hours.
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Nice post Dan. I thought some other background might be of interest. I was a mechanic for Mack Truck years ago, and Mack had 2 mechanical injection pump styles. The American Bosch & the Robert Bosch (German). The Americans you could service the delivery valves on the engine, but there were no crush washers, you had lap the valves in on a lap block to get them to seal. The Robert Bosch could not be done on the engine as removing the delivery valve altered the internal pump timing. These could only be done off the engine so that they could be re-calibrated on a calibration stand. That was unless you had the very special alignment jig that was installed on the valve before removal. The RB pumps were supposed to be better, but we all thought they were a pain in the butt. I just closed on a 1973 GB 36 with twin Lehman 120's, so I am always interested in information regarding them. Again, nice post, thanks for the info. PS anyone know about the pump oil change interval and oil type? Thanks
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Old 01-07-2021, 02:06 PM   #29
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In the last seminar that Bob Smith gave before he passed, he said to start at 50 hours and see if the oil is diluted. If not then extend it a bit more and see if it is diluted. He said every engine is different and you need to find the sweet spot for your engine. One member in the seminar said he had 2 120s. One had to be changed at 50:hours and the other one could go 100 hours. So I would look at the oil at 50 and if it isn’t diluted then try 60 and so on. Good luck with your new boat. Have fun!
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Old 01-07-2021, 05:36 PM   #30
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Dave, good point. I measure the volume of oil drained from the pumps. Even at 150 hours I have never seen oil in volumes in excess of the initial fill. So, doesn't that mean fuel dilution is really not very much? I once talked with a FL120 owner who did not become aware of the oil change requirement for FOURTEEN years. He did find that there was a lot of fuel dilution when he changed the oil but with no apparent damage to the pump because he had continued to use that pump for several more years and was continuing to do so. This was not a lightly used vessel. I have a sense that there has never been a real test of how long these pumps would last with infrequent oil changes. Still, I will continue to change my oil every 150 hours. Easy enough to do and not costly.
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In the last seminar that Bob Smith gave before he passed, he said to start at 50 hours and see if the oil is diluted. If not then extend it a bit more and see if it is diluted. He said every engine is different and you need to find the sweet spot for your engine. One member in the seminar said he had 2 120s. One had to be changed at 50:hours and the other one could go 100 hours. So I would look at the oil at 50 and if it isn’t diluted then try 60 and so on. Good luck with your new boat. Have fun!
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Old 01-07-2021, 06:00 PM   #31
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Good job!
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