Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-12-2020, 07:18 PM   #21
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,656
Welcome.

I moved from sail to power 3 years ago. It has been a good move.

FWIW, my Dad was the Clark Boat Company dealer in the Southern Puget Sound area back in the day. I was a kid when the SJ24 first came out and we raced is pretty competitively in the 1/4 ton category. Great boat. We would spend a week in the San Juan Islands with 5 on board.

Good luck with the searching and looking.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2020, 07:22 PM   #22
Guru
 
Jeff F's Avatar
 
City: Great Lakes
Vessel Name: Escapade
Vessel Model: 50` US Navy Utility trawler conversion
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 872
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLD View Post

You mention that you wife doesn't like sailing as much as you do. Does she not like sailing at all? or does she not like sailing on a small boat. There is a big difference between a 35'+ sailboat and your current 24' boat.

Jim
Second that. Don't give up on sail too soon. Jump over to a sailing forum for some ideas, but there's lots to fit your budget.
__________________

Jeff F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2020, 07:55 PM   #23
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: penultimate Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 12,105
I became tired and fearful (solar rays) operating my sailboat in an open cockpit. Now, happily operating from a pilothouse.
Attached Thumbnails
ICaptain.jpg  
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2020, 10:21 PM   #24
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Vessel Name: Floatsome & Jetsome
Vessel Model: Meridian 411
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 7,009
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLD View Post
I think this is a great comment about not falling in love with the outside appearance of a boat!

However, I don't think it is necessarily true that a sailboat will feel smaller than a trawler. Yes, it may feel different, but not necessarily smaller.

Here is the inside layout of a Grand Banks 36 and a Hunter 376. They are two very similar size boats.

[IMG][/IMG]

The Grand Banks has a LOA of around 36'10" with a 12'8" beam. The Hunter has a LOA of around 37'3" with a 12'7" beam. The headroom in the aft cabin of the Hunter is more limited above the bed as the cockpit floor hangs down, but otherwise, the inside area is about the same.

Jim
Apples to oranges. Compare the Hunter to a Carver. And the GB to a Hinckley. The. You’ll see the space difference. But comparing one of the most voluminous sailboats to one of the least voluminous powerboats isn’t a fair comparison.
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B...Sold
Meridian 411...T-Cummins 450C
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2020, 09:53 AM   #25
Guru
 
firehoser75's Avatar
 
City: Nanaimo
Vessel Name: Pilitak
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,457
T and J,
Welcome to the forum, and the same decisions that many of us here have made in the past. We sold our 37 foot sailboat in late 2015 and went to a powerboat about 1 year later. We took our time looking, trying to "get it right" (or as close to it) for us as we could. I still love sailing, but to be honest, we did not actually sail that much in this area. Usually either the winds were on the nose, no or little wind, or we were trying to time a slack current at one of the many passes we would use annually. In essence, we had a power boat with a stick, that we occasionally sailed. To be fair, we were not purists, and if going less than about 2 knots under sail, we usually motored.
You seem worried about fuel costs (a bit). We operate at 7-8 knots and burn about 2 gallons per hour (including a small amount of generator time). As others have said, it really is about the big hit at once when fuelling, and the average over the year or compared to other boating costs is not that bad. It depends how you look at it.
One thing to be well aware of going in, is that for a boat in the price range you are talking about, maintenance and repair costs will most likely be fairly high due to the age of the boat you will most likely end up with (unless of course you go for something fairly small - say size of your San Juan). By doing most of it yourself, you can greatly reduce these costs.

Good advice about getting on board as many different boats as you can. Photos only show so much, and often don't give the overall "feel" and true perception of size of the boat. Take your time, be patient, and find what will make your wife happiest if you actually want to go boating. I have heard of many stories where an unhappy wife has ended boating for a couple. Especially for an older boat, look carefully for one that has been very loved by her previous owners and has good maintenance records. You will be glad that you did, but it could take some time before you find the "right" boat. Good luck.
__________________
Tom
Nanaimo, BC
firehoser75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2020, 10:07 AM   #26
Veteran Member
 
City: Punta Gorda, FL
Vessel Name: M/V Nomad
Vessel Model: Camano Troll 31
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 36
"Watched the men who rode you go from sail to steam. And in your belly you hold the treasure few have ever seen." (J.B.)

I made the switch three years ago, from a 34' Aloha (Lived aboard for 7 years) to a 48' Marine Trader. Then I went back to a Hunter 260. Now I am back in a 31' Camano Troll (<-Look left). Going back just made me more conscience to MY preference for a trawler.
Don1500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2020, 11:13 AM   #27
JLD
Guru
 
City: Maryland
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
Apples to oranges. Compare the Hunter to a Carver. And the GB to a Hinckley. The. You’ll see the space difference. But comparing one of the most voluminous sailboats to one of the least voluminous powerboats isn’t a fair comparison.
I disagree its an apples to oranges comparison.

The Hunter 376, size-wise, is not much different than many other sailboats in the 37'ish range. Especially a production boat built over the last 25 years. Almost all modern sailboats, above 32' will have an aft stateroom, unlike a 50 year old Hinckley.

Likewise, I chose the GB because, this is after all, the trawler forum.

Yes, a Carver, especially an aft cabin, may have more room. If we are talking about a 355/356, with the 3' - 4' swim platform, it would also be a longer boat. However, an express cruiser (with a 37' LOA) would be downright tiny with the interior space compared to many sailboats.

Also, don't forget to add in the OP budget, 50K - 75K.

So, I stand by my original post. Yes, there are many other likes, or dislikes in choosing one boat over another (could be power/sail, or trawler/motor yacht/aft cabin/cruiser/etc.) This all goes into an individuals boating preferences.

One is not necessarily better than the other. Any boater needs to pick the vessel that is the best fit for themselves and their spouses. I think we need to careful, however, not to project our needs/wants onto another boater.

Jim
JLD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2020, 10:17 AM   #28
Member
 
Steve1.0's Avatar
 
City: Hobe Sound
Vessel Name: Kumatage
Vessel Model: Grnd Bnks 46 cl
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 21
You can also try chartering a trawler for a week and see how it fits your style(s). As a former rag-bagger (Morgan 28, Morgan 452) my new hole in the water is a trawler. 17kts. if I need it, 1 mpg when I don't.
I'm looking forward to crossing the gulfstream in half the time. It will be much less of a task.

Just my 2.5c


P.S. Just took it out for a sea-trial after replacing the steel tanks. So far so good. Now to put the generator back in place and start fixing something else. I may need one of those hammer cases. :-)
Steve1.0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2020, 01:19 PM   #29
Member
 
Jonboy108's Avatar
 
City: Gates Mills
Vessel Name: At Last
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 32
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 11
Went from a Tartan to a Nordic Tug

Interestingly, there are three Nordic Tugs (32 footers) in close proximity to one another on Lake Erie, two in Cleveland and one in Vermilion OH. All three captains went from Tartan sailboats to the Nordics. Mine was a 27, one other was I think, a 34 and the last a 40. We all three still love sailing but love going in straight lines at 7-10 knots. The diesels are relatively fuel efficient- I burned about 175 gallons last season having made trips to the Erie islands and over to Canada. A gasser planing out at 20+ knots could burn that in a day. If its the dark side, well then welcome to it- we have air conditioning!
Jonboy108 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2020, 01:42 PM   #30
Guru
 
oscar's Avatar
 
City: Bethlehem, PA
Vessel Name: Lady Kay V
Vessel Model: 1978 Hatteras 53MY
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 954
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLD View Post
otherwise, the inside area is about the same.

Jim
Nope. Look at a lateral cutaway. In the interest of performance the sail boat has minimal volume around the human envelope. The trawler is almost square. HUGE difference in volume. It's not all about floor space.
__________________
https://ladykay.blog/
oscar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2020, 02:03 PM   #31
Member
 
Jonboy108's Avatar
 
City: Gates Mills
Vessel Name: At Last
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 32
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 11
A lot is different spacewise

A sailboats cabin is snug, mostly dark and can be a bit cave like. This is not pejorative, I rather like being down in a sailboat cabin hearing rain patter on the deck and totes, and yes even halyards tapping on the mast. A trawler generally has much larger windows and an open, airy feel inside. You steer from the wheelhouse and in rainy weather you turn on the windshield wipers rather than don your foul weather gear.
Jonboy108 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2020, 02:18 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Bryant's Avatar
 
City: Fleming Island, Fl
Vessel Name: Sakura Perdido
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 486
switching

Quote:
Originally Posted by TandJRacing View Post
My wife and I have a San Juan 24 that I've put quite a bit of effort into ensuring she's safe, suitable and smart looking, but the wife just doesn't like sailing as much as I do. We've talked recently about getting a trawler instead to cruise the San Juans and beyond in more comfort, if more expense.

Here's our priority list for a trawler, based on desires, experience and capabilities:
-Cost: Sub-$75k for sure, sub-$50k for the right boat
-Hull: I'm not crazy about wood. I like the idea, but have seen too many customers unaware of serious developing issues that just wouldn't happen with fiberglass.
-History and condition: I worked at a local boatyard and was a crew chief for a motorcycle race team for 12 years, plus I do have the Nigel Calder book. I'm comfortable performing most repairs that don't require cylinder head removal or opening a boat transmission. That said, of course better is better, and time cruising is better than time wiring and varnishing.
-Looks: The missus has to think she's pretty, of course.
-LOA: I need to be able to singlehand on a regular basis in year-round PNW weather. Also, bow thruster. Also, a cheaper slip is a huge plus.
-Beam and stability: If she's too "rolly" we're back where I am now with the wife uncomfortable at sea.
-GPH: A major part of why I love sailing is cost per mile. Reasonable GPH at cruising speed is a must.
-Speed: Semi-planing seems nice to have, but seems likely to price us out.

What sayeth the group? Is this a fool's errand or are there possibilities for us? I traded a motorcycle for my trusty SJ24 Wasabi, so even $50-$75k is a huge jump for us. That said, we both love the water and the San Juans, but getting the missus to commit to days aboard my little sailboat ain't gonna happen.
I seriously recommend that you charter a trawler of the size you are contemplating for a few days and see what you are getting into. In beam seas they roll like a bastard. In on coming seas of any size they hobby horse a lot. And I own a Trawler so I'm not bad mouthing something that I don't know anything about. I love my boat (most days). Just go into it with eyes wide open.

Of course, there are exceptions to every rule and everyone "knows a guy...." who found this or that but I would be very careful about buying a sub $50k 30 year old boat. Your'e likely to spend that much to make it useable.

Happy hunting!
Bryant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2020, 02:26 PM   #33
Veteran Member
 
City: W. Babylon NY
Vessel Name: Shellerina
Vessel Model: Mainship 390
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 36
Former sailor now trawler-or...

I grew up sailing and cruising the Maine coast in a 31' F/G full keel boat. For health/mobility reasons, we moved to power boats with swim platforms and walk through transoms so my wife can come and go unassisted by me (in a slip).

The biggest difference is we would cruise by sail in the afternoons and aim for a pre-sunset landing at whatever our destination was. Afterall the wind is best in the afternoons. Cruising by power is just the opposite. You will leave with the sunrise and try to be destinated by 1:00pm or 2:00pm. Sailboats "converted" to power cruisers are very stable and fuel efficient, and almost go as fast as our Trawlers do. Just a thought. You can get into a big sailboat easier in your price range than a trawler. Then just outfit it for power cruising.
Lots of loopers do it this way. Draft is the thing to watch obviously.
Capt Ray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2020, 02:27 PM   #34
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 22,688
Quote:
Originally Posted by oscar View Post
Nope. Look at a lateral cutaway. In the interest of performance the sail boat has minimal volume around the human envelope. The trawler is almost square. HUGE difference in volume. It's not all about floor space.
Absolutely!

Even if they were similar in volume...the feel from the trawler's windows make the difference.

Those same features are why I feel more secure offshore in most sailboats over most similar sized trawlers.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2020, 02:36 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
Bryant's Avatar
 
City: Fleming Island, Fl
Vessel Name: Sakura Perdido
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 486
switching

Quote:
Originally Posted by JLD View Post
I think this is a great comment about not falling in love with the outside appearance of a boat!

However, I don't think it is necessarily true that a sailboat will feel smaller than a trawler. Yes, it may feel different, but not necessarily smaller.

Here is the inside layout of a Grand Banks 36 and a Hunter 376. They are two very similar size boats.

[IMG][/IMG]

The Grand Banks has a LOA of around 36'10" with a 12'8" beam. The Hunter has a LOA of around 37'3" with a 12'7" beam. The headroom in the aft cabin of the Hunter is more limited above the bed as the cockpit floor hangs down, but otherwise, the inside area is about the same.

Jim
There is absolutely no comparison between the feel of being inside a Hunter 376 and a GB 36 Classic. The GB will feel like a studio apartment with an enormous amount of room in which to just stand up and move around freely, not to mention the windows in the main saloon which tend to open up the boat even more. A closer comparison would be with a Nordic Tug but even then, with the layout and the windows, the Tug seems much less confining that a sailboat.
Bryant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2020, 03:40 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
City: Prescott, Arizona, USA
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 126
Welcome T&JRacing! I am a life long sailor and have owed and been the caretaker for several ocean capable sailboats. First off the SJ24 is a great little boat and quite seaworthy for its size. But with a boat that small, you will fall into every hole in the ocean so it's no surprise that your wife might prefer something more stable. That said, sailboats are inherently more stable than power boats because of the (usually) deep keel and the wind pressure on the sails that tends to dampen the motion. So a larger sailboat, say something in the 35 - 40 foot range just might be an answer.
In my case, my wife and I found that as we age, handling large sails (apex 500 sf) is simply more than we want to handle - or feel safe handling. And we found that much of our "sailing" time was under power because of lack of wind, wind in the wrong direction and so forth. So now it's trawlers for us. We have been chartering a GB42 out of BC. It can be rolly but inside steering when the weather is bad, a light and airy cabin and good creature comforts make it worth while for us.
You are, IMHO, in the best cruising grounds in the world (and I have sailed all over). As others have suggested try a bunch of boats, I suggest even chartering - a bit pricey but less than owning especially if you wife is still uncomfortable .
good luck, please keep us informed.
Exctyengr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2020, 05:52 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
GoneFarrell's Avatar
 
City: La Conner, WA
Vessel Name: Imagine
Vessel Model: Farrell 34
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 491
I got the OP and the missus out to Hope Island and back yesterday on Imagine, we had a great time.
He got some 6 knot wheel time, anchor-assist for me at the helm, thruster demo at docking and a sample of my home brew.

She had a nice flybridge boat ride, brought us all lunch and liked my foldup rocking chair!

Looks like I may have brought a rag-bagger over to the oily side.
GoneFarrell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2020, 08:13 AM   #38
Guru
 
backinblue's Avatar
 
City: Stratford, CT
Vessel Name: Blue Moon
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 355
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 515
I have owned 3 sailboats over 20 years or so and recently made the switch to power. I won't recommend a boat but will share a few of my own experiences/opinions.
Yes you will burn more fuel, but that doesn't mean it's more expensive than sailing. Multiple sails, rigging, etc, are expensive to buy and maintain. It's also often that motoring your sailboat is the best option anyway. Motoring is great to get somewhere faster. What used to take a day, can now take a couple hours. But the journey is not as fun. When you are sailing, the journey truly is the destination. When motoring, there is little to do once you set your course other than keeping a lookout and checking gauges and charts. It's not the same experience, but you can go to more places more quickly. It's all a trade-off, there is no right or wrong answer that suits everyone.
backinblue is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2020, 08:51 AM   #39
Veteran Member
 
NCheaven's Avatar
 
City: Chocowinity, (Cypress Landing) NC
Vessel Name: Boatwright
Vessel Model: Camano 31
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 94
Camano 31' might be a good choice for you. It's a PNW boat, and there is an active Pacific Camano Owners Association you can google for their perspectives on the inside passage. (Hint, a lot of those folks use the Camano for that purpose.)

By the way, I had a San Juan 21' in the late 1970s, early 1980s, raced at Blackbeard Sailing Club near New Bern, NC, where Coral Clark of Clark Boat company facilitated our San Juan 21' one design fleet races. I even did a week long cruise on the SJ21'....like two weeks under the dining room table.

Back to Camano. I bought mine in Bristol RI, and spent 11 days in transit (15 including commissioning before the trip) down the east coast - straight out into the North Atlantic, then inside Long Island, through Hellsgate and the East River in NY City, New Jersey off shore in the Atlantic, up Delaware Bay (roughest day due to strong winds on the stern), down the Chesapeake, through Norfolk Harbor, down the ICW to the Pamlico River, turned up the river to home port in Chocowinity, NC. I was amazed that such an experience had escaped me for my first 67 years....simply wonderful. The Camano was a delight, two men on board - seller the first 4 days, Chesapeake based friend the rest.

There are several articles on the Camano that you can find on line from PassageMaker and Soundings magazines and I recall some from Pacific Northwest Cruising or something like that.

My wife and I are 5'10" and 6'2", and we find the v-berth to be wonderfully comfortable - rides the anchor quietly without the "chine slap" that I've read about for other boats. The Camano is fuel efficient - the Pacific Camano group has stats at a wide range of RPM/speeds, and they are similar to my experience. Range with either the 100 gal tanks or 132 gallon tanks is ample. Plus, the Camano has the speed to get to protected water as the weather deteriorates, which we did twice on the Chesapeake.

Best part: There really are Camano 31s for sale for under $75,000 at times in the PNW.

So, check them out at Yachtworld, the Pacific Camano Owners group, and the East Coast Camano Owners group, find the magazine articles, look at the Camano Program videos made in the early 1990s on youtube. Send me a note if you have questions.

Other boats I considered: Nordic Tug 32, C-Dory 25, Atlas 25 (very cool!), Cape Dory 28. Strength of hull is important in the PNW and in some of the places I go - Aligator-Pungo Canal, and someday the Dismal Swamp Canal. There are other choices. My decision was influenced by articles about how the Camano was built for the PNW, floating logs in the water, very strong hull, keel and skeg protecting the prop, easy handling with large rudder and bow thruster, and ample evidence that people use the Camano for extended cruises in all parts of the US. Low center of gravity makes for good stability for this size boat. Having a flying bridge is far more fun than I expected, and we spend much of our good weather days up there. The most common engine in the Camano 31, Volvo TAMD-41P-A, is often found in commercial boats, and it runs like a charm, literally starts withing one second almost all the time, and truthfully, never more than 2 seconds. I like that!

Good luck in your search!
NCheaven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2020, 09:58 AM   #40
JLD
Guru
 
City: Maryland
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 594
You guys slay me!

I get it that y'all prefer trawlers over sailboats, otherwise you would be posting on sailnet.com

My comparison of the GB and the Hunter was not for you. It was for the OP.

Everyone who has purchased a powerboat has done so because this type of boat (trawler/motoryacht/express/etc.) suits their needs. This is the same reason that others purchase sailboats. We all have wants/needs/biases/budgets when it comes to boating and that is why we choose the boats we choose.

The OP, on the other hand, loves to sail and it would behoove him to look at more than trawlers. If his wife likes a larger sailboat, then this is a win for satisfying their needs. If not, then they buy the type of boat that does.

Jim
__________________

JLD is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×