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Old 07-17-2021, 05:51 PM   #41
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Slowgoesit... Im looking at a few places in western KY/TN.
The one I prefer has a rock ledge but no dock yet. For about 50k ill have 4 acres with all New power, water, dock, and ramp. Plus a gravel parking area for the boat, RV, and a few other vehicles. What would prohibit me from living aboard my boat on my own land/dock? Do many areas have rules like that??

Oh. You probably know. What is a 'Wet Hull'?? The broker gave me different stories. The rudder pin leaks a bit and the inside is moist... The foam cored hull is wet inside but he coated the bottom with XYZ so its sealed... the windows leak some and its causing humidity to build up bla bla bla... (hard to find any concrete info on the Bluewater Yachts but the 'hull' isnt supposed to be foam cored in the 80's. But that could be wrong too.)

The boat was Nice and all but those big diesels make it impossible to do anything around them... AND they are in abused condition, no hour meter, cobwebs... no radar or other Electronics but a vhf radio. Many things not opperational. But it was nice to tour it (luv the flat layout!) And get an idea of the buying process.
Wet hull internally.... walk away. There will alway be another boat, perhaps even better.
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Old 07-17-2021, 05:55 PM   #42
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+1 Dan.
With the wet hull, and the other list of issues the OP presented, I would not consider this boat at all. It sounds like it will cost more than it is worth in both time and money!
Many better boats out there, even in this market.
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Old 07-17-2021, 09:28 PM   #43
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Wet hull internally.... walk away. There will alway be another boat, perhaps even better.
Yep. I mainly went to tour it and get an idea of its layout. Like the very tight engine bay with big V8s. The rest is actually Really nice! (Layout. Not condition.) I Like the teak everywhere inside. Fiberglass decking. Things like that. But as you and Firehose said 'another will be along'...
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Old 07-17-2021, 10:10 PM   #44
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You might want to check if there are governing rules or a governing body that approves piers and design. We have something like that here in BC.
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Old 07-18-2021, 03:01 AM   #45
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As others have stated, if the boat is cored below the waterline, and there is water present, walk away. Too many potential issues that could affect the structural integrity of the boat.

Is the land you are looking at on a lake or river? Is it considered a navigable waterway, ie, under the Corp of Engineers control? What water depth will you be looking at at the edge of your dock? Is the water level managed? By that, I mean, does someone control the water level like they do on Barkley or Kentucky Lake? You may want to do some research on what the lowest level they can take it to, to ensure that you have sufficient water at your dock for the lowest level they can take it to, or at least the lowest level it has been historically. Personally, I would want 6' absolute minimum at the lowest level they can take it to. That allows leeway for if you decide to get a deeper draft boat in the future, or such.

On the land side, make sure that the land is zoned to allow an RV to be placed there year around. That may require the installation of a septic system as well. If so, place the septic system in a location that will allow a house to be built in the future if you so decide, or to enhance resale value if you decide to sell. Kentucky and Tennessee are pretty lenient regarding zoning once you get out of the cities, but make sure there is no HOA (home owner's association) that has jurisdiction where you are buying. MAKE SURE that whoever puts in the dock/pier gets the proper permits to do so, or you may find yourself having to remove them at a later date.

Best of luck as you move forward!
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Old 07-18-2021, 08:34 AM   #46
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Rsn48. In Mn we have some Very strict shoreline rules and laws in place. Kinda why I have been hoping to find an Old old farm site with some sort of docking site on a river.

Slowgoesit.. lot of info! In Mn they can get pretty permit happy but not too hard to just follow the rules, find the Loopholes, and get what you want. IE: You cant build a garage/Shed here until you build a home. (Or at the Same time) BUT... Being an agrarian based state, rules are in place that you CAN build a BARN on empty land. Barn/Shed/Garage/40x80Man Cave... Put the 'right' word on the form and its Approved!

Thanks Guys! Lots to learn and absorb in this lifestyle! Quick Poll- Opinion on getting a nice salvage boat and mounting it on land as an Apt/home... Kinda like in Second Hand Lion where they have a big ship in the tiny pond. I'd have a 40-ish trawler in a koi pond- just no barn full of Gold.
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Old 07-18-2021, 12:49 PM   #47
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One thought, check with the various planning boards to see if they are planning on building low bridges. LOL
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Old 07-19-2021, 12:44 PM   #48
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Sea sickness can subside after a day or so. Charter now, maybe more than a couple times, in different boats and wait out this boat market. Some chance it will be better next year.
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Old 07-19-2021, 12:56 PM   #49
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To find out if you're susceptible to sea sickness try offshore sport fishing. Book a room at a place like Westport Washington. Go out on some fishing trips. You'll be out half a day or more. Come back with fresh fish and knowing about your reaction to rocking and rolling.
Totally agree, but it depends on where you want to go with your trawler. I can't go out into the ocean without getting seasick, but I can motor all day on the ICW and other inland waters.
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Old 07-19-2021, 01:39 PM   #50
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At about a grand a day. Wouldn't it be cheaper to just buy a beat up boat and Upgrade after I'm done 'beating and learning' on it? You wouldnt lose $10k if you buy carefully.

Boats and Everything are up right now. But that is going to Pop pretty soon! THEN ill be investing. ��
With no previous boating experience you may find it difficult to get insurance for a liveaboard size boat. Figure out what you think you want and call a couple of companies and find out if they will insure you. Also, marinas that allow full time liveaboards are getting fewer and fewer all the time. Going to a trawler School and obtaining some sort of licensing or qualification will be of great value to you, will give you a feel for whether trawlers are for you or not and will be a nice vacation. You do not want to buy a “beater”, fix it up and then sell it if you don’t like it. That will cost you infinitely more in the long run and many more headaches than a 5 or 6 day charter with captain.
Which St Cloud do you live in? Where do you intend to keep the boat?
Just for planning purposes, you can count on spending 10% of what you paid for the boat annually to own, operate and maintain your boat.
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Old 07-19-2021, 01:52 PM   #51
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"Just for planning purposes, you can count on spending 10% of what you paid for the boat annually to own, operate and maintain your boat."
And if you pay less than $100,000 for the boat (an older or a "beater" as you called it) your costs to own, operate, and repair/maintain/update your boat will be considerably more than that 10% figure!!!!! Just saying
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Old 07-19-2021, 02:31 PM   #52
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Hey all!!

Been wanting to go RVing/Live Aboard a trawler for many years now. Well... That Time is Now... Retired Military Bachelor with no children. Parentless now and selling my home on a Market HIGH! 27' RV ready to go but no Boat...

Looking for advice going into it. What to be aware of and all the little things that Really matter but arnt mentioned. Like Seasickness... How do I get time on a boat to find out? Buy that 100k Grand Banks and cant stand to be on open water for an hour?? LoL

Im going to scout around the forum and see what I can find.

Thanks!
Mike

Well Mike, I guess it depends on what part of the country you’re in. But your best bet would be to sit down and talk to somebody who is currently a live board or who has lived a board and see what they say. Then take a look at their boat and see what that feels like.
If you are in the Houston area or are coming through I’d be more then happy to sit down and talk to you. But there are just way to many things to discuss then can be put in a short response.
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Old 07-19-2021, 10:42 PM   #53
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ODan. That was a concern lol. Glad you reminded me. One property is right off the Ohio but a low bridge...

Bryant. Im just here for now. Im getting an acre in SW VA to put my RV on and scout around for my perfect Rural River front places i can dock my boat at. In western TN or along the Ohio/Kentucky rivers (Tributaries of them)

Om not buying this year. Maybe a fishing boat to get my boating legs back and work into learning the intricacies and problems as I work up to a bigger liveaboard. Once I have my property and slip. Ill just dock it there.

I know nothing is perfect and im not looking for Perfection or Good luck lol just hoping to learn enough to keep me from looking too ashamed lol
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Old 07-20-2021, 09:30 AM   #54
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Great advice from TF members!

Lots of good comments posted for our new member. I especially commend Firehoser75's comment on 10% of the cost of the boat being spent annually.

Chartering - best idea, but you can probably find a day charter, whether fishing or otherwise, to test sea sickness.

Repairing. Smaller, sound boat might be a better choice than a bigger "project boat". Give that some thought. If you're inland, smaller makes good sense. My 31' was fine taking New Jersey off shore on well researched good weather days - RI to NC delivery voyage - but ocean travel is not in my future plans. Wilmington NC to Philadelphia is my target range. If I had a larger boat, I might amend that. But, I can accomplish a wide range of destinations and cruising experiences with what I feel are reasonable limitations, precautions and objectives.

Find a friend with a sailboat on big water, even a big lake. A windy day under sail, healing enough to put the lee rail under, take some green water over the bow - you'll know about sea sickness quickly. I'll bet you can find some folks who were sea sick initially, but "got back on the horse" enough times to overcome it with or without medication. You'll probably find some on TF. Many trawler owners are former sailors. (Cooking below decks on an alcohol stove in lumpy seas, under sail - I found out the limits of my motion tolerance. Had to come up for air every 10 minutes or so.)

Fuel is the least expensive aspect of owning a trawler. Insurance, slip fees, boat yard repairs/bottom paint, and discretionary purchases - marine stores and catalogues can be enticing - a test of character!....., then there's updated electronics, and more..... It does add up to 10% of original cost on average, and I'm guessing more for an older boat that's not in top condition. (I tell my non-boat friends that owning a boat makes owning a horse look smart. Owning a boat costs much more.)

Single engine. Read Steve Zimmerman's article on engine life and % of effort - diesels need to be run hard enough at intervals to clear out the exhaust system. A single engine running a little harder, say 20% to 35% of WOT GPH might be a better choice than two running at lower RPM. Plus, maintaining two engines does cost more. Letting a second engine "feather" is a false economy - doesn't save much fuel, and risks overheating your stuffing box on the free spinning prop. Look at Nordhavn as an example of single engine dependability - ocean crossings on private single diesel trawlers.

Main thing is that you're asking the right conditions in one of the best places - TF. Consider taking a Power Squadron boating course or two, and ask the instructors about their experiences on the waters where you live and plan on boating. USPS is outstanding for instruction from supportive, helpful, experienced boat operators. Join USPS and attend frequent meetings, dinners, seminars, etc....one of my best choices.

Best wishes for your boat dreams coming true, especially if you keep asking good questions of boaters experienced on the waters you intend to cruise. By the way, most of us started exactly where you are - dreamers who did our homework, listened, and put dreams/resources/goals/feedback into a formula to come up with a workable and realistic outcome. (Watch "Captain Ron" to see the alternative way to get into cruising.)

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Old 07-20-2021, 09:48 AM   #55
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Welcome !

I say do it! Figure out what you want, figure out how to get it.

Get out in the open water and see how you do, some are fine, some are not. Sign up for a deep sea fishing charter. Yes it will cost ya, but its cheap in the long run and a lot of fun.

As far as twins vs singles.... there are a few threads on this, each have valid points. I prefer twins, but would happily take a nice Grand Banks with a Single in a few more years when I have more time to putt around.

I am a fan of buying a cheaper boat, fixing it up, learning it and selling it off to get a bigger one. You will not make $$$$. But you will learn all the systems and what its like. Be prepared, as it takes a ship load of time and $$ to fix boats ! The first few boats were small fishing boats or ski boats. Our fist bigger boat was an auction boat, it was a 24' Sea Ray weekender. It did not run, it looked like crap. I paid 5k for it and sunk in another 10k within the first year. We used it a lot! Had a lot of fun and sold it for 7k. We then wanted a bigger boat, we looked around and I thought I wanted an old Grand Banks 32 with a single. We ended up with a 33' sport fisher Egg Harbor. It was in rough shape but the bones were good. I paid 20k, sunk in another 20k and used it for two seasons. It had twin gas engines, It drank a lot of fuel (the cheap part of owning a boat). I sold it for not much more than I paid for it and it looked fantastic. We put about 1500 hours into it, just the wife and I. And I would do it all again. We now have a 48' Sport fisher Egg Harbor. It looked a little rough around the edges. I have sunk in a lot of time and $$ once again. Each boat built my experience far as restoring them and operating them.

I did had a hard time getting insurance on the 48' do to my lack of experience on larger boats. I took some class's and hired a professional to help us learn. I will recommend you to hire a pro as soon as you can ! I wish I did this year ago!
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Old 07-20-2021, 09:53 AM   #56
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Buying a small fishing boat to build some experience is a great idea. I recommend insuring the thing with a company that also insures larger and older boats even if you only plan to use it in a remote area and it is of little value. Establishing a track record of ownership with an insurance company will make life a little easier when you are ready to buy a larger boat. The insurance many still require some additional training or experience documented but it will be a much smaller leap than having no track record of responsible boat ownership in the past.
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Old 07-20-2021, 11:29 AM   #57
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Seasickness:


I believe strongly that seasickness goes away with age or experience or both.


I first started boating at age 25, 50 years ago. Was regularly seasick on 30 and 40 foot sailboats. Gradually got better. Sailing around the world in 1995-98, was never actively seasick. In 2001, I was working on the forward head on another person's Swan 44 sailboat in the Gulf Stream. I ignored the growing symptoms and lost lunch. Haven't been actively sick since, in 20,000 miles of racing and cruising, including an Atlantic crossing and several rough passages.


Pay attention to your stomach. If you start to feel even a little queasy, eat something -- I like saltines for this. Ginger snaps are even better. Ginger seems to help, but not a can of ginger ale on an empty stomach. Stay away from alcohol.


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Old 07-20-2021, 12:22 PM   #58
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Firehoser/Northern spy/others

What is your opinion of rebuilding a sunk or otherwise salvaged boat? I have seen a lot of threads (here, passage, etc) about abandoned/sunk/too $$$ to fix boats in various spots around the country, just for hauling them away.

Once I sell and go RVing; I will have the Time, place and money to play. Learning How its Assembled and Works is important to me. My nephue is a diesel mechanic. (Not a 'marine' one and it wont be a Case of beer, more like a 6-pak of MacAllans!! Lol) I can build it up the Way I want it. (Long range & Comfy- The Rest is undecided lol)

I think spending a few years of my time rebuilding 'MY' boat and learning to boat; is better spent than doling out cash for a 'nice one' and bang it up, damage it in learning.
Something that no one mentions is that threads like this come up pretty much weekly, new potential boater wants to know how many engines they need, what kind of anchor and if they can cruise to the Bahamas on a $20K ugly boat.

If the visible part of the boat is ugly, you can be fairly sure that the hidden parts, the parts that count are even uglier. Thru-hull fittings you can remove with your hands and no tools; exposing holes directly into the water, hoses ready to burst at the slightest touch, stuck valves that break off in your hands instead of turning, poorly executed repairs, it can (and will) go on and on. and on. and on some more.

There's an allure/romance at the thought of acquiring some old beat up neglected beauty and returning her to her former glory. The before and after pictures are great! Youtube abounds with channels dedicated to doing just that.

What this look like in reality is multiple man-years of toil and labor' Mountains of expensive parts to replace or rebuild. Every system on board needing overhauling. If you want a project, then that's not a problem, just walk into it realizing that it's a huge undertaking and a big commitment to see it to the end.

It's a long road and not easy. It can be done, I'm pretty sure it can at least, going to find out soon enough. If you want some practical experience, come on out to San Diego where I'm engaged in just such an endeavor.
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Old 07-20-2021, 02:41 PM   #59
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LOL the romance of buying beater and restoring it does not excite me in a positive manner.
Visit the boat yards and look at the boats that are half restored before the owner lost interest.
Maybe you can buy a 'half done' boat and finish it.
Dont neglect your other obligations, ie your wife and kids etc.
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Old 07-20-2021, 02:45 PM   #60
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If I were you, especially as a self professed "beginner", I would not consider a badly damaged boat like a hurricane recovery or one that has sunk. Way, way too many variables and hidden potential problems. To be honest, most of what you propose to me sounds more like boat repair and upgrading, and not boat ownership and enjoyment!!

But, maybe the repair/tinkering aspect is what you are looking for?? Just not at all my cup of tea, and too much risk in my book.
Good luck with whatever you decide.
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