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Old 12-19-2020, 04:07 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
When considering boats it is important to take into account a change in technology that occurred somewhere in the 90ís that affects boats.

The traditional deck on a boat was constructed of a balsa core encapsulated between two layers of fiberglass. They did this to keep weight down and provide strength. Any water intrusion into this sanwhich of material resulted in rotting of the balsa core. Water gets in through any penetration or around edges of cutouts.

Just another thing to consider
ksanders, thanks for the info and another reason why we are hoping to purchase a boat in 15-20 year range.

For all of the things that will eventually fail if you own a boat long enough, I sure hope to avoid expensive headaches like this!
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Old 12-19-2020, 04:58 PM   #22
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Hi Paul and Annie,
Welcome to the forum from another retired FF, located "just" south of you (or north depending which location you are at right now).
Just to comment on the Nordic Tug aspect of your posts. I am not saying by any means that they are the "best" boat for what you are describing. However, there are many Nordic Tugs that operate with regularity in the SE Alaska, BC coast (inside passage) areas. The vast majority of these boats (especially the 37's and down in size) are not stabilized. Mine is not stabilized. Certainly there are times where stabilization would be welcomed, but watching weather windows and careful trip planning can greatly reduce the need for it. Our boat is an NT 37 (2002) with a Cummins 6BTA engine (not common rail) and we average about 2 gph at 7.5 knots (averaged over several years and hundreds of hours). I know another owner who travels every year from Seattle to Alaska (except this year), and he has over 10,000 hours on that same engine and it is still performing well. He operates it regularly at about 1/2 throttle (7 knots) with the occasional run at higher RPM (even WOT) to burn off any deposits. His maintenance is thorough as is mine. Having the ability to "speed up" for periods when desired has proven to be very useful, especially in quartering or following seas when speeding up can "smooth out" the ride for more passenger comfort.
Nordic Tugs are not open ocean boats, but they are very capable if properly managed to cross the Alaska Gulf (weather dependent) and navigate the BC coast. You may even be able to find an "older" NT 42 that does have active stabilization.
Based on your listed info, other boats you might want to consider are: American Tugs, Kadey Krogen (some with minimal exterior teak), Helmsman, and maybe North Pacific. I am sure there are others as well.
For additional info, Nordic Tugs (like many other makes as well), can suffer from what can be termed "bow slap". Sometimes when at anchor, small waves can "get under" the bow chine and create a slapping noise. Some people find this very unsettling, others hardly notice or get used to it. The problem can be dealt with effectively with some exterior fibreglass work, and many owners have done this and had good success.
Anyway, good luck with your search.
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Old 12-19-2020, 04:59 PM   #23
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Welcome to TF Paul and Annie. Remember, we like pictures.
Well......we don't currently own a boat. But I'll post a couple pics of our last little Bayliner we owned a couple years ago in Alaska just for fun.
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Old 12-19-2020, 10:43 PM   #24
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Firehoser75
Hi Tom, thanks for the reply (and from a fellow FF)! We love your area of the world and actually owned a house on North Pender Island for 10 years. We thought it would be our retirement home but after 35 winters in AK we decided for warmer, drier and sunnier winter weather in the desert.

Thanks for the real world info with your Nordic Tug. I've known a couple people that own them and they seem to love their Tugs! I've never owned or worked on a boat with stabilizers but that doesn't mean I wouldn't greatly appreciate them if they were available. If we found a NT for sale that ticked most of our boxes we would seriously consider one. I do like the idea of having a boat that can give you options to out run weather or the ability to "speed up" in following seas as long as it would be fuel efficient most of the time. The NT appears to tick both boxes.

Your suggestion for other boats to consider is really helpful as I am new to the larger coastal cruiser/passage maker scene. I know of American Tugs and Kadey Krogen but have little to no experience or real world knowledge regarding any of them. It will be fun and time consuming to conduct my research.

Our Bayliner was horrible for "bow slapping" and I am one of those people that it drove nuts. I tried many things but never considered modifying the bow to make it less of a problem. If I wind up getting a NT I might pick your brain for the actual solution.
Cheers,
Paul
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Old 12-25-2020, 01:33 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by AK-Firedude View Post
Newbie to the forum here. While we currently do not own a boat at this time we are in the market for a used modest sized trawler.

We have been looking at the Nordhavn 40 which appeals to me on so many levels (stout, fuel efficient, open ocean capable, etc) but lacks some things that we want interiorly. This style of boat (trawler) is a totally new experience for us.

My wife and I are both retired but have owned both a 26' & 28' Bayliner's while cruising Prince William Sound in Alaska for 15 years. My earlier career before joining the Anchorage Fire Dept was as a commercial king crab fisherman in the Bering Sea for 9 years (1981-1990) and about 15 years salmon fishing in Bristol Bay and around Alaska.

We currently split our time between Alaska and Sedona, AZ. I know, kind of ironic for a guy who loves the ocean but after 35 winters in Alaska we really enjoy the sunny and warmer desert weather in the winter.

We are hoping to find a trawler that we can cruise the inside passage of Alaska and coast of BC for 4-5 months a year as a live aboard. We are looking in the $400k-$450k range and do not want a project. We do not have kids but we will have the occasional guest or two. We have our share of re-powering boats and dealing with many different issues. Knowing how much maintenance and potential mechanical problems boats can be, we are hoping to hedge our bets with a well built and reliable trawler.

So, I will be scouring this forum for peoples knowledge and experience with different manufacturers and designs. I know opinions of boats are always subjective and often biased by the owner but I also know that all manufacturers and models have obvious pros and cons.

Thanks for letting me ramble....

I look forward to learning a lot from the vast wealth of knowledge on this forum.

Cheers,
Paul & Annie

I just put mine up for sale in awesome condition.
https://miami.craigslist.org/pbc/boa...251441048.html
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Old 12-25-2020, 11:57 PM   #26
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Thanks Mikentosh for the heads up. Unfortunately we are looking for a boat less than 20 years old, 40-50ft in length, and located on the west coast as we are not interested in shipping a larger boat across country.
Thanks for thinking of us anyway!
Paul
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Old 12-26-2020, 05:02 PM   #27
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Look at a Nordic Tug for Alaska, and think about moving onto a boat in the Sea of Cortez for the winter. I am bi nautical. I keep a 34 ft sailboat in Ketchikan for SE AK cruising in the summer. And a 43 ft Ocean Alexander twin diesel motor yacht in the Loreto, MX for cruising n the winter. Great combination.
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Old 12-26-2020, 05:05 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by MVDarlin View Post
Look at a Nordic Tug for Alaska, and think about moving onto a boat in the Sea of Cortez for the winter. I am bi nautical. I keep a 34 ft sailboat in Ketchikan for SE AK cruising in the summer. And a 43 ft Ocean Alexander twin diesel motor yacht in the Loreto, MX for cruising n the winter. Great combination.
Now that is an awesome idea. Crusty.....
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Old 12-26-2020, 05:31 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by AK-Firedude View Post
Your suggestion for other boats to consider is really helpful as I am new to the larger coastal cruiser/passage maker scene. I know of American Tugs and Kadey Krogen but have little to no experience or real world knowledge regarding any of them. It will be fun and time consuming to conduct my research. Paul
Other well known brands that would on first blush suit your mission and criteria include:
- Ocean Alexander
- Grand Banks
- DeFever
- Selene
- Hampton
- North Pacific
- Helmsman
There are others
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Old 12-26-2020, 07:38 PM   #30
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Sunchaser, thanks for the list. I've heard of many of these but again, I have no real experience with any of them (mostly commercial vessels and Bayliners).
The challenge with Covid and no boat shows scheduled for awhile, will be having to travel to various places see some of these models in person.
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Old 12-26-2020, 07:44 PM   #31
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MVDarlin, I've spent many of my late teens thru twenties out at sea so I know I could live aboard full time especially not having to work!
I floated the idea of full time live aboard living to my wife and she stated that we (She) should just start out with the plan to spend 4-5 months a year for now and then see where we go from there.

It sounds like you found your perfect paradise(s)! Geez, what more could a man ask for in this life?
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