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Old 09-14-2020, 02:27 PM   #21
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Eastern US Tour

We purchased a 1986 Kady Krogen in Florida in June 2017. In December we cruised north on the ICW stopping along the way to enjoy Southern Hospitality. We arrived in Maine for the summer. We spent the winter of 2019 and 2020 at the Safeharbor Charleston City Marina before returning to New England. Now we are headed south for cruising in the Eastern Caribbean. Things that made this trip enjoyable were having a seaworthy boat with good ground tackle, comfortable salon, great galley, separate shower, and comfortable berth. Many trawlers will provide this, but if you are going to go to the Eastern Caribbean make sure yours will be able to go the distance.

The East Coast is filled with cities to explore, American History to learn about and wonderful people. Great plan, so get ready and go.

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Old 09-14-2020, 03:10 PM   #22
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Those are all very good points and you are correct that if the wife isn't happy and comfortable then going on an expedition of this nature would not end well. Dipping the toe in the water is probably the best course. As you suggested, chartering a boat in Florida for a few weeks would be a worth looking into or maybe we should find something here in San Diego/Newport Beach to buy/live on for a trial period.

As someone noted above I need to make a list of "must haves, want to haves and must not haves in a boat" and work from there. I'm not really thrilled about the idea of buying in CA and then selling and buying another boat on the east coast. That sounds like a hassle and a money loser to me.

The wife doesn't like rough seas. I took her sailing around Alcatraz in 20+ knot winds and very sloppy/seas when she was pregnant/sick with our first child years ago and I still hear about it That said, if she did not tell me that she was very interested in doing this, I wouldn't be thinking about it. I've been married too long to make that mistake.

Thank you for your thoughts and advice - and those of everyone else as well.

LOL. I used to be an avid yacht racer. I took my wife on her first regatta on my J 24 in 25 kts of wind. To say that she did not enjoy the experience would be an understatement. I won't quote what she told me I could do with that boat the next morning after the regatta. Don't jump into the Maelstrom. Dip your toe in the water.
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Old 09-14-2020, 03:21 PM   #23
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Given the list of "must haves" It has to be something like a small house if this will work. Been thinking about 59 GBs and 70 Marlows - used, not new
A 59 GB or 70 Marlow to start? With a wife new to boating, cruising etc? That's courageous, to say the least.

Since you asked for advice, I'll give you mine. Try a smaller trawler, cruise the ICW between Key West and Virginia Beach. You'll get open ocean, ICW, large Sounds, The Dismal Swamp, The Outer Banks and many Rivers. Basically, everything you could possibly want to experience. You can even hop out of the ICW in Florida and make a 46 mile passage to Bimini just to try that out (but don't go in a North Wind). Or Start out in Pensacola and cruise the ICW and bays East and West for a bit. I would just look at a plan that is a little less aggressive to begin with. But, Good Luck! Have fun! Looking is the beginning of the adventure.
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Old 09-14-2020, 03:29 PM   #24
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Men are predominantly the dreamers and doers when it comes to boats. Some wives are gracious and go along with your dream no matter how little they care for boating. Others will make your life miserable until you give up. If you're determined on your dream, eventually you maybe faced with pursuing your goals or you wife's goals.

Unless reincarnation happens, this life is what you got to live your dreams.
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Old 09-14-2020, 03:33 PM   #25
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My wife and I are kicking around the idea of buying and living aboard a boat for a couple years - before we get to old. Me more than her. I have been away from boating for many years but grew up with boats, worked at a Marina during HS and college and know a bit about boats (such as you can always count on things to fix, boats depreciate and it is will be more expensive than you anticipate).

While we are currently on the West Coast we are primarily interested in cruising the East Coast from the West Indies to Maine. We don't care about speed and would rather trade that for range and efficiency. I'd say the odds of getting this done are about one in ten, but it's nice to dream.

I joined this forum to dig into the whole process a little deeper and figure out what I need to do to get this done.

I'll just throw one more thought into the process. Having a boat in San Diego, with all of the access to great water in that area, short trips to Oceanside, up to Dana Point and out to Catalina gives you pretty much the entire experience. I've lived out there and did that and it's pretty great. The plus there is that you don't have hurricanes, tornadoes, bad thunderstorms etc to deal with. If you are currently living in San Diego and considering a 70' trawler then you might just consider a 42-48' Trawler and the Marriott Marina in San Diego and cruising up and down the So Cal Coast to begin with.

But then, your original question was "What do I need to do to get this done"? Most haven't even answered that, but I'll give you my thoughts later.
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Old 09-14-2020, 03:48 PM   #26
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The problem is that the PNW is about the only place to cruise on the West Coast and that is seasonal. What do you do in the winter if you liveaboard? On the East Coast you can winter in the Keys or in S Florida and summer in Maine or any point in between.
Not true at all. The area from San Diego up to Oceanside then on to Dana Point and out to Catalina Island is a wonderful cruising ground and offers almost everything: Bay day cruising, short green water passages, great marinas to visit, short passages to an island and a great island destination. No hurricanes. No thunderstorms. Cruising in So Cal has a lot to recommend it. I know. I've lived there and done that. The only down side is the cost and dealing with the lunatic govt of California.
Or the other option is put the boat in the PNW and you can cruise year round in some of the most spectacular water and scenery in the world. Yes, it gets chilly in the winter and there are rain days, but the further you go up Puget Sound, the more the rain becomes drizzle and you sit on your boat on a beautiful day with a little drizzle and read or cook or go ashore and do whatever wearing your slicker. That's not a bad area to headquarter.
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Old 09-14-2020, 04:35 PM   #27
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My wife and I are kicking around the idea of buying and living aboard a boat for a couple years - before we get to old. Me more than her. I have been away from boating for many years but grew up with boats, worked at a Marina during HS and college and know a bit about boats (such as you can always count on things to fix, boats depreciate and it is will be more expensive than you anticipate).

While we are currently on the West Coast we are primarily interested in cruising the East Coast from the West Indies to Maine. We don't care about speed and would rather trade that for range and efficiency. I'd say the odds of getting this done are about one in ten, but it's nice to dream.

I joined this forum to dig into the whole process a little deeper and figure out what I need to do to get this done.
Ok, I've pontificated a lot, as well as others have while not answering your original question, so now I'll get to that.

The first thing you need to do is to be brutally honest with yourself about what you really want to do and how you really want to use a boat. That includes your wife and her thoughts. We all want to cruise off to Fiji or somewhere in the South Seas but are we really going to do that or do we need to invest in a boat capable of dong that? Secondly, you need to be just as honest with yourself about your ability to handle a boat of any size, much less a boat of that size. That requires a considerable amount of skill. Additionally, your maintenance skills, your ability to be independent out in blue water, you and your wife's physical condition, mobility, strength and attitude about rough water, etc are all considerations.
What is your financial situation? You mentioned a 59 GB or much larger. Owning and operating a boat of that size isn't for the squeamish. The cost of buying, berthing, maintaining, operating, supplying, insuring and upgrading a boat of that size is astronomical. You had better be independently wealthy.
Insurance is an issue and can get quite expensive. The age of the boat, the cost of the boat, the survey, your previous experience, where the boat is berthed, all comes into play.
I'm not trying to rain on your parade or harsh your dreams. I just think, that based on your original post and your situation you might consider a little less aggressive plan to begin with.
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Old 09-14-2020, 06:05 PM   #28
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Here is a fun perspective. I recently had my land home renovated. I also own a trawler. Love her and wouldnít give her up for the world. I spend a lot of time on her. I do most work on her myself. Iím proficient in the engine room and beyond. With that said, here is my couple month experience living onboard while the land house was being worked on.

Week 1: glorious getting to the marina even with my small dog in tow and groceries. I have a wardrobe on board so no issue there. Open the boat. All systems on. 7am. Disembark to take the dog for a walk. Shut down all systems, put sunshades down, turn off water. Go to land house and work all day. Not livable.

Week 2: raining mot evenings when returning to marina with dog in tow, a case of water and those damn groceries. Ugh forgot to turn the water on. All systems on cook a nice dinner. 7am. Disembark to take the dog for a walk. Shut down all systems, screw the sunshades, turn water off.

MONTH 2: I now have the dog getting in and out of the car by himself. Good lord, how can I have this many groceries? Iíll come back for the case of water. The walk is only 1/2 a mile! Damn, I have to bring my clean laundry onboard. No way itís going to fit in the cart. Why is it 100 degrees out? Turn water on. WHAT IS THAT SOUND? Omg, waterline blew. Run outside and shut the water off. Jump on the boat, (dog is barking) open the engine room. Water everywhere. Trip to the Home Depot with dog in tow. Itís 8pm. Back to the boat. Engine room light went out. Great, Iíll do this with a flashlight. Fixed it in an hour. Itís 10pm. I have to bail forward. Not enough to bildge. In the shower by 11:15pm. Cold water since I couldnít wait for it to heat up.

MONTH 3: Iím tired. Shut the water off left all the food in the fridge. Gathered all the laundry, put the sunshades up, turned off all the systems except for air which I left on everyday. Dog in tow. I stopped a few steps from the boat, looked back and said, Iím going to miss not living on you. Land home is finished.
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Old 09-14-2020, 07:08 PM   #29
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Reading all the posts about the PNW (I live in Kirkland, WA and my oldest son and his wife live on Whidbey Is.) I would would be very appreciative if someone could point out a live-aboard slip anywhere in the Salish Sea that doesn't have a 1 to 5 year waiting list for it. We've found the boat but can't find a place to dock it. Should this be for another thread?
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Old 09-14-2020, 07:16 PM   #30
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Reading all the posts about the PNW (I live in Kirkland, WA and my oldest son and his wife live on Whidbey Is.) I would would be very appreciative if someone could point out a live-aboard slip anywhere in the Salish Sea that doesn't have a 1 to 5 year waiting list for it. We've found the boat but can't find a place to dock it. Should this be for another thread?
Iím not trying to be funny. Point Roberts has no waiting list for liveaboard slips. However, I have no idea how you can get there other than by boat.
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Old 09-14-2020, 07:35 PM   #31
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Iím not trying to be funny. Point Roberts has no waiting list for liveaboard slips. However, I have no idea how you can get there other than by boat.
Thanks, TR, but Point Roberts isn't even accepting live-aboard applications. I had looked into that last week. Even Squalicum Harbor has a 5-year wait for boats 44' +.
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Old 09-14-2020, 07:48 PM   #32
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We have lived aboard a total of about 13 years, 8 of which were mostly full time cruising. A 59 to 70' boat is a huge maintenance issue. Who is going to do the washing and waxing, cleaning vinyl windows etc? When we were in our 40's we sailed a 62' Pilot house motor sailor to Europe and Back from Long Beach Ca. 3 staterooms were great--because we had our children aboard part time, and lots of friends to join us. (Started with a 38' traditional sailboat--and wife realized that being cold and wet was no fun). Voyaging is different than living aboard in a fixed marina. We got the larger boat, and for the most part sailed it with just a couple. A few years later when we retired, we got a 46 foot pilot house motor sailor. That was a lot easier to maintain, dock and maneuver. It still had two state rooms; it is rare that you want more than another couple aboard.

The smaller the boat, the easier it is to find dockage, to get into interesting harbors, and most likely the more you will voyage. If you are getting to the 60 foot size you are looking at crew for maintenance. Something to consider. Also going to come with both water draft and air draft which may preclude going many routes. For example if you want to do the "Great Loop" you cannot have more than a 17' air draft.

There is a large amount of room in the "Sundeck Motor yacht". Starting in the low 40' to 50' size. That would good good for much of what you want. Maybe not as good for going to the Caribbean below the Bahamas. A boat good for passage making may not be as desirable for coastal cruising.

How is the boat going to be stabilized? Active fins? Gyro with a generator running all of the time when underway/at anchor?

Think of the logistics of provisioning for even a couple of months in the Bahamas. Then the adaptation to the availability of supplies there--and potentially crowded anchorages.

If I were doing this, I would do a lot of reading on what the cruising is like on the East Coast (We happen to like it-- but also agree that the PNW is a fantastic place. We spent 4 seasons (April thru Oct) cruising the inland passage to AK, left the boat in Sequim for the winter, and RV ed in Florida--eventually bought a home.

Your idea of a month here and a few weeks there works well. But..moorage may be hard to find in some areas (especially the larger boat).
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Old 09-14-2020, 10:11 PM   #33
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Check out eastern N.C. for cruising destinations, reasonable dock fees, ample anchorages, etc. My 38’x15’ slip cost $12,500 and annual fees under $1,000 annually. ICW is just down stream from here. Play with Navionics and build potential routes from N.C. to destinations of choice. Smaller trawler works great on inland waterways from Cape May to South Florida and the Gulf. But sparsely populated Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds and tributaries in NC are the best cruising grounds I know of, many small historic colonial towns, and many offer free docks for one or two nights. Fishing is great, too. Bottom line - NC is trawler heaven.
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Old 09-14-2020, 10:54 PM   #34
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Mitch L...

Good luck. Think you can find the boat (little house with all the comforts 59-70’) you want for about $1.5 million. Expect operating costs (i.e., maintenance, insurance, fuel, dockage and modest repairs) to run about $75,000 per year.

Consider the smallest boat that checks all your boxes. Something in the 50 foot range with two staterooms may be ideal for a couple to provide all of the comforts you expect.The trouble with bigger boats is that they can be limiting with draft and dockage since most marinas can accommodate a 50’ boat but getting toward 70’ may be challenging. Also, most moorings don’t do well trying to accommodate boats 60-70’ due to weight, windage and length.
garychurch -

That is very helpful. That's about was I was thinking regarding purchase price, but your estimate of operating expenses is most helpful. I was paying our $8k homeowners insurance premium today (fire issues have push that up here in CA) which made me wonder around how much it cost to insure a boat is this size range? Probably close to the same?

One of the "must haves" is a king size bed which seems to be a common feature of the GB 59, but there don't seem to be many smaller boats that meet that criteria. I really like the 59 and don't really want anything bigger for all the reasons you and others have mentioned. I believe some of the Marlow 57s meet the KS criteria as well. I like the Marlows too, but it might just be the blue paint which you can apparently get on a GB as well, so I need to keep that in mind

I don't know if it is possible to do so, but it would probably make a lot of sense (to SSobels point and that of others on the forum) to do a multi month charter and see how we really feel about living on a boat. While I would never buy a new boat, it is still clear to me that vessels in this size range are not very liquid and obviously depreciate. Lots to think about and consider - the forum definitely helps in that regard.

Also gets my thinking about the PNW (thx to rsn48 and others). That would probably be as good a place as any to conduct that type of live aboard experiment.
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Old 09-15-2020, 12:26 AM   #35
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Thanks, TR, but Point Roberts isn't even accepting live-aboard applications. I had looked into that last week. Even Squalicum Harbor has a 5-year wait for boats 44' +.
Interesting, last Sept my neighbor moved to Point Roberts from Seattle. He told me they didnít care or event think about liveaboards. This must be a new change for them, possibly even related to Washingtonís no eviction order. The no eviction order could possibly have put a moratorium on all liveaboard slips in the state.

At the moment Iím not sure if I want to refill any of my apartment units after tenants move out until this no eviction order is canceled.
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Old 09-15-2020, 04:56 AM   #36
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There are a number of youtubers with hundreds of videos describing the liveaboard experience that you may want to check out.

Also, you said buying a boat in San Diego for a while, selling it, and then buying a boat on the east coast is a hassle. Pulling up roots, a cross country move, buying a boat and not being happy would be a bigger hassle I would think. Your San Diego boat would give you the chance to sample the lifestyle for a week or two or more, get familiar with all the systems and maintaining them, brushing up on electronics ( they have come a long way in 30 years ) and MOST IMPORTANTLY, get your wife on a boat for a few extended periods. Asking your wife to learn how to handle a 60 foot boat with no experience could be intimidating for her. It would be for me!

Another thought, and hopefully some others will chime in here, if you haven't boated in a while, it may be hard to find insurance if you get too big of a boat. Owning a west coast boat for a while might make that process easier as well.
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Old 09-15-2020, 05:36 AM   #37
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My wife and I are kicking around the idea of buying and living aboard a boat for a couple years - before we get to old. Me more than her. I have been away from boating for many years but grew up with boats, worked at a Marina during HS and college and know a bit about boats (such as you can always count on things to fix, boats depreciate and it is will be more expensive than you anticipate).

While we are currently on the West Coast we are primarily interested in cruising the East Coast from the West Indies to Maine. We don't care about speed and would rather trade that for range and efficiency. I'd say the odds of getting this done are about one in ten, but it's nice to dream.

I joined this forum to dig into the whole process a little deeper and figure out what I need to do to get this done.
https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/198...cabin-3710258/
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Old 09-15-2020, 05:37 AM   #38
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fresh water and very favorable exchange rate

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/198...cabin-3710258/
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:36 AM   #39
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FWIW Mitch L I'm in a somewhat similar situation to you - some (limited) boating background during my teenage years (dad had a Hallberg-Rassy 312) but my wife of 31 years has none.

Now we are both 2 years from retirement and keen on converting our 'dirt house' into a 'liveable' boat for the summer months to explore the Mediterranean - not least to define where we wish to retire to ashore (currently looks like it might be Menorca).

Our boat will be a small cruising catamaran though, albeit new - thereby swallowing pretty much all our ready cash although hopefully not requiring much mending until I've learnt how do do it.

Like you, we initially intend to familiarise ourselves with both the actual boat model and living aboard in general through a couple of onboard courses/rental cruises.

My wife has a bad back and therefore absolutely requires a stable boating platform, and describes the lovely wide cockpit under a hard Bimini (with massive solar paneling on top) as being like a wintergarden.

That said, if our preliminary weeks spent on the water this autumn and next spring prior to signing up for a purchase prove that a live aboard existence isn't compatible with my wife's condition then it will stop us sinking most of our worldly wealth into a vision that's doomed to fail ...
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:51 AM   #40
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Couldnít agree more

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Wifey B: Why?

You haven't boated in decades and she's not really interested. Doesn't sound like a recipe for success.

Get beyond the dream and what do you expect it to be like? I'd suggest you and your wife charter a couple or more boats for a week at a time and then perhaps that will give you both some clarity. Remember, one convinced against one's will, remains unconvinced still. Stole that one from hubby who stole from professor but it's so true and if you talk her into it with a hard sell or guilt, it won't last two years. She'll fly home for a couple of weeks which will turn into many more.

I love boating, love the water, but I see people like you who know nothing about living on a boat and cruising and all in involves deciding from afar it looks like a fun thing to do. It is fun, but only if you prepare and understand what you're in for.

How do you think she, at least somewhat a non-boater, is going to like it when you take your nice coastal cruiser and cross from Turks and Caicos to the Dominican Republic and the 3' seas turn to 5' seas with short periods and you bounce around like kids in a bounce house?

One advantage we have is that not just the two of us but all those who regularly cruise with us are avid boaters and use to boating off shore and prefer calm but deal fine with adverse conditions. Charter enough that you encounter some less pleasant seas.

I want to encourage boaters, but only if it's right for them. There are many here who have zero desire to boat from the West Indies to Maine unless you're limiting the West Indies to one country of the 13, the Bahamas. Some people start out thinking of circumnavigating and end up boating happily forever after within 300 miles of home. Many in your situation are happy coming down the coast and visiting the Bahamas and returning north once a year. Still step one is get the two of you on some boats and see then how you both feel.
I couldnít agree more. We cruised for six years on our sailboat before selling her in preparation for buying a trawler. We decided to retire onto a boat with no previous boating experience and while it was the most worthwhile thing we ever did, it was also the most difficult. In the six years we cruised on her, we saw so many people give up, mostly because he wanted to go and she didnít. In our case it was me that had the idea and my husband came along, but it was still very difficult for him. We wrote a book about the experience that might be helpful to you called How NOT to Buy a Cruising Boat thatís available on Amazon. Even though itís about the disaster that was our experience buying a sailboat, the principles are the same for buying s trawler.

I also want to encourage you to try it, because it fundamentally changed who we are for the better, but you must be prepared for the challenge or it will ruin your relationship.
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