Go Back   Trawler Forum > Trawler Forum > Welcome Mat
Click Here to Login


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-23-2019, 09:26 PM   #41
Senior Member
 
Capecodder's Avatar
 
City: Cape Cod, MA or Fort Myers, FL
Vessel Name: Osprey
Vessel Model: Her Shine. Newburyport
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 373
Congrats on the new boat, welcome to the forum and North Fort Myers
__________________
Advertisement

Capecodder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2019, 10:01 PM   #42
Veteran Member
 
Wayne's Avatar
 
City: Parker, FL
Vessel Name: Cobie
Vessel Model: Cobia 220 Walk Around
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 87
Hi, When I bought my 46' sloop-rigged sailboat, I had never sailed a boat of any kind before except an 8' pram I made out of an old rowing dinghy. I bought the 46' sailboat from a dealer in Solomon's Island, MD. Upon leaving Solomon's Island, I was sailing singlehanded. I had a good wind, so tried out the genoa. Wow - that thing had POWER! I sailed under just the genny about 1/3 way to Hampton Roads (Langley AFB), then got brave and tried out the main sail, too - hull speed the rest of the way. I had quite a bit of time flying small private planes and understood the concept of lift - a sail works essentially the same way to go upwind, and is basically in a full stall when going directly downwind. Upshot is, I learned to sail by simply doing it and noting the limits of the sails. I practiced and practiced - "docking" and backing up using half filled milk jugs, as noted in an earlier post pertaining primarily to my old twin-engine trawler, instead of hard things like pilings, other boats, etc. That sail boat only had a single prop, so had to learn how to cope with that. Even learned to dock under sail (end of a "T" dock) in varying wind and currents. Each boat has its own quirks - learn what they are by practicing every maneuver you can think of - out in an area where you can't do any damage. Learn how your boat "sails" in the wind and how it reacts to cross currents when practicing docking. Boat handling will become second nature. Always, ALWAYS try to stay ahead of the boat - meaning know what it wants to do/will do before it does it. And, as others have already said, learn how each and every system on the boat works. I found that maintaining and improving a boat is almost as fun and satisfying as actually using it. Congratulations on having the intestinal fortitude to make the plunge! I, as we all do, wish you the very best.
__________________

__________________
Wayne
Wayne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2019, 10:22 PM   #43
Guru
 
healhustler's Avatar
 
City: Longboat Key, FL
Vessel Name: Bucky
Vessel Model: Krogen Manatee 36 North Sea
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 5,050
Here’s a great video of another Lady living her dream.

__________________
Larry

"When life gets hard, eat marshmallows”.
healhustler is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2019, 12:35 AM   #44
Guru
 
Bob Cofer's Avatar
 
City: Caimanera
Vessel Name: Seafarer
Vessel Model: 1926 56’ Winslow RDMY
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1,235
Welcome to life on the water! You will find that the things you worry about the most generally turn out to much less daunting once you get started. Probably the best resource you have is friendly dock neighbors and your willingness to ask questions. Post away on this and other sites but prepare yourself for an onslaught of opinions, rants and arguments!

Welcome,
Bob & Jill

Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1303.JPG
Views:	46
Size:	150.9 KB
ID:	94335
__________________
What kind of boat is that?
Bob Cofer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2019, 09:37 AM   #45
Guru
 
Group9's Avatar
 
City: Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, (or where the anchor drops)
Vessel Model: 1973 42 Bertram MY
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 1,224
Welcome aboard. I've lived aboard three different times, about a year each time, (two of those were cruising, one was at a marina).

Every single time I quit, was due to a partner who got tired of it, not me. As far as I'm concerned the best three years of my life were the three living on my boat.

You'll be surprised how quickly you learn things. Especially, when things break. Fix as much as you can yourself. It's usually a lot cheaper, and you learn your boat and it's systems, which will reduce your stress a lot.

Look for the Sea Daddy, (or Sea Mama) in the marina who's been doing what you want to do for a while, and who gives good advice. My live aboard, in a marina, I became good friends with the harbormaster and his wife, who had been living aboard for forty years.

They both taught me more than I learned in seven years of higher education! He sat over me, drinking a rum and a coke, supervising me doing a lot of repairs to my boat, (not doing them, but telling how to do them, which is lot different).

He taught me the dreaded one engine stern to, docking, a skill that I did not have a clue about, before I met him. He did it one time, and then made me take the boat out, and back it back in, about ten times, until I had it down pat.

It's going to be great!
__________________
"It's the tides. They can work for you, and they can work against you. And, confidentially, I've had this problem with the tides before." Captain Ron
Group9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2019, 03:56 PM   #46
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 20,101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna View Post
I’m here “knotyour wife”. I have done and continue to do just about everything on my marine trader. The only thing I couldn’t do was get the new refrigerator on board or the new batteries but I sure did install them with some muscle help.

Ask away!
Wifey B: Yay, Donna. Brighter than a streak of lightning, More beautiful than the pounding surf, Mightier than a roaring hurricane, here to save the day.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2019, 05:12 PM   #47
Guru
 
ben2go's Avatar
 
City: Upstate,SC
Vessel Name: Shipoopi
Vessel Model: derilic sailboat
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,800
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Wifey B: Yay, Donna. Brighter than a streak of lightning, More beautiful than the pounding surf, Mightier than a roaring hurricane, here to save the day.
__________________
This is my signature line. There are many like it but this one is mine.

What a pain in the transom.

ben2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2019, 10:59 AM   #48
Veteran Member
 
City: FORT MYERS, FL
Vessel Name: Knot Your Wife
Vessel Model: Marine Trader
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capecodder View Post
Congrats on the new boat, welcome to the forum and North Fort Myers
What Marina are you at?
Knotyourwife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2019, 11:11 AM   #49
Veteran Member
 
City: FORT MYERS, FL
Vessel Name: Knot Your Wife
Vessel Model: Marine Trader
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna View Post
I’m here “knotyour wife”. I have done and continue to do just about everything on my marine trader. The only thing I couldn’t do was get the new refrigerator on board or the new batteries but I sure did install them with some muscle help.

Ask away!
Thanks! You should check out my post on the red neck drainage fix I found! Over the past three days I have had the whole roof taken off, I was staring at the fly bridge and the stars-completely rotten. An expense and nervous breakdown I didn't expect at all.

So far everyone has been very helpful-marina life is interesting to say the least.
Knotyourwife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2019, 11:17 AM   #50
Veteran Member
 
City: FORT MYERS, FL
Vessel Name: Knot Your Wife
Vessel Model: Marine Trader
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 25
Great video a few posts above-thanks!
__________________

Knotyourwife is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×