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Old 04-05-2020, 02:20 PM   #1
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Help with mooring pendant and swivel

Boat is on a buoy for four months in the summer in an area with a large fetch. I am using this mooring pendant: https://dbropes.com/products/custom-...b1aceca3&_ss=r

My 3-strand mooring pendant is unraveling in some areas due to twisting while out on the buoy. Looks like I need a swivel.

I am looking at this one: https://www.e-rigging.com/three-quar...yABEgKn2vD_BwE

Anyone have recommendations on a good setup to prevent twist? I thought the mooring chain had enough play in it to prevent 3-strand from unraveling, but I guess not.

Also, my boat is ~12,000 pounds loaded. The swivel above is 7000 pounds WLL. That's gotta be sufficient (my guess is that it is since it's not like I'd be lifting the boat up in the air with the swivel)?

Thanks in advance. Sorta anchoring related?
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Old 04-05-2020, 04:28 PM   #2
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I think the swivel was pretty much standard issue on similar bridles I've seen on the great lakes. That looks like the right size swivel. Galvanized is cheaper and may work just as well.
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Old 04-05-2020, 07:40 PM   #3
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A little bit of a thread hijack so I'm sorry in advance.

Do you hang a black round ball when at anchor? I usually do and have had other boaters stop by and ask if I needed help, they didn't know what the black ball meant.

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Old 04-05-2020, 08:04 PM   #4
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I know a joke about "Blackballed". From the English "Yes Minister" TV series, regarding a Nigerian aspirant for membership of an exclusive London club. Equally irrelevant but heaps funnier. How about a yellow ball for quarantine?
PS. Can`t find the sketch, but here`s the punchline:

PM: "Was he blackballed?";
Sir Humphrey Appleby: "I should think so".
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Old 04-06-2020, 06:27 AM   #5
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The system that seems to work well attaches the chain directly to the mooring pennant with a light line and pick up stick attached to the spliced eye at the pennant end.

The mooring ball simply holds the chain end , no loads go thru the ball.

Place your boat name and boat size on the mooring ball.

Fix a 1/4inch loop on top of the pick up stick, so its EZ to grab with a boat hook.
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Old 04-06-2020, 08:29 AM   #6
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I'd use galvanized over SS. I had one of those fail on our paravanes. A different application but it looks like the same swivel and it wasn't overloaded. I'm not sure if it was a manufacturing issue and/or crevice corrosion. It looks like the 2 end nuts are welded on. Was water able to get in and around the nuts/threads? Are these made for long term immersion in salt water?
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Old 04-06-2020, 05:39 PM   #7
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Apparently they don't make a jaw-and-jaw galvanized swivel. At least I can't find one anywhere. They are all stainless. Looking for 3/4.

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I'd use galvanized over SS. I had one of those fail on our paravanes. A different application but it looks like the same swivel and it wasn't overloaded. I'm not sure if it was a manufacturing issue and/or crevice corrosion. It looks like the 2 end nuts are welded on. Was water able to get in and around the nuts/threads? Are these made for long term immersion in salt water?
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Old 04-06-2020, 06:41 PM   #8
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How are the other mooring systems in your area set up?

You could always add a higher rated galvanized shackle from your swival to the thimble with monel seizing wire. Just thinking out loud here.
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Old 04-06-2020, 11:10 PM   #9
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I don't see swivels on the buoys, but that doesn't mean anything. Most people don't think about these sorts of things.

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How are the other mooring systems in your area set up?

You could always add a higher rated galvanized shackle from your swival to the thimble with monel seizing wire. Just thinking out loud here.
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Old 04-08-2020, 05:34 PM   #10
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Boat is on a buoy for four months in the summer in an area with a large fetch. I am using this mooring pendant: https://dbropes.com/products/custom-...b1aceca3&_ss=r

My 3-strand mooring pendant is unraveling in some areas due to twisting while out on the buoy. Looks like I need a swivel.

I am looking at this one: https://www.e-rigging.com/three-quar...yABEgKn2vD_BwE

Anyone have recommendations on a good setup to prevent twist? I thought the mooring chain had enough play in it to prevent 3-strand from unraveling, but I guess not.

Also, my boat is ~12,000 pounds loaded. The swivel above is 7000 pounds WLL. That's gotta be sufficient (my guess is that it is since it's not like I'd be lifting the boat up in the air with the swivel)?

Thanks in advance. Sorta anchoring related?
I purchased a similar mooring line from dbropes two years ago, and no issued with a 5/8" galvanized swivel, connected directly to the mooring chain, not on the top of the ball. I attached 2 ft of pool noodle 2-3 ft from the thimble (it is very cheap), and works great to avoid damage on the rope. I recommend to use the pool noodle, as well the mooring lines from dbropes.com are made with 100% nylon with a lot of stretching, they made custom orders too
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Old 04-08-2020, 07:19 PM   #11
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If the longevity of the swivel is in question, would it make more sense to put it on top of the float ball to keep it out of the water ??
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Old 04-08-2020, 08:54 PM   #12
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If the longevity of the swivel is in question, would it make more sense to put it on top of the float ball to keep it out of the water ??
I agree, if the length of mooring line is minor of the distance from the cleats of the boat to the water, if the line is longer be sure that the rope will go around the chain under the mooring ball and the swivel on the top do not make his work damaging the rope. (see the pictures)




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Old 04-09-2020, 10:39 PM   #13
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I decided AGAINST going with a swivel completely. After talking and researching, too many stories of swivels being the first item to break in the mooring system. Not worth the risk. My pendant is two seasons old and started unravelling in one area. Two seasons is about as long as one could expect from a pendant in constant sunlight (May thru Sept), so the pendant has lived it's life. Time for a new pendant. I'll just deal with any twisting as I see it in the pendant instead of introducing another possible failure point.
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Old 04-10-2020, 06:01 AM   #14
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"I decided AGAINST going with a swivel completely. After talking and researching, too many stories of swivels being the first item to break in the mooring system. Not worth the risk."


GOOD MOVE , a single point failure that could cost the boat is always a poor choice.
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Old 04-10-2020, 03:54 PM   #15
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I don't know how the rope would unwind. Where is the twist coming from? Tidal flow turning the boat counter clockwise all the time?
Also, nylon rope is not know to be much effected by UV from sunlight.

Probably good to not have the swivel. The one you chose was WAY to large in my opinion. The jaws were an inch and a half wide. It was the pin that was 3/4.
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Old 04-10-2020, 09:15 PM   #16
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The twist confuses me as well. We do get tidal exchange in our area, so between that and the wind, it's happening nine the less.

Is it possible to have too big of a swivel considering it is a failure point? Regardless, won't be using one.

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I don't know how the rope would unwind. Where is the twist coming from? Tidal flow turning the boat counter clockwise all the time?
Also, nylon rope is not know to be much effected by UV from sunlight.

Probably good to not have the swivel. The one you chose was WAY to large in my opinion. The jaws were an inch and a half wide. It was the pin that was 3/4.
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Old 04-10-2020, 09:33 PM   #17
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"I decided AGAINST going with a swivel completely. After talking and researching, too many stories of swivels being the first item to break in the mooring system. Not worth the risk."


GOOD MOVE , a single point failure that could cost the boat is always a poor choice.
Everything is a question of sizing and resistance... On your car your wheel stud is a single point of failure, but sized not to be subject to break, same for a lot of things...
A swivel is a point of failure as much as any chain piece, samson post or cleat.
If sized to sustain what it should be well there is not much point of failure, not more than a rope or anything else.

In a other life I was doing a lot of climbing, any anchor was a single point of failure, but when intended to sustain 100x your weight well...


L
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Old 04-11-2020, 02:09 PM   #18
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The problem with a swivel is that you can't fully inspect the inside mechanism where corrosion lurks.

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Everything is a question of sizing and resistance... On your car your wheel stud is a single point of failure, but sized not to be subject to break, same for a lot of things...
A swivel is a point of failure as much as any chain piece, samson post or cleat.
If sized to sustain what it should be well there is not much point of failure, not more than a rope or anything else.

In a other life I was doing a lot of climbing, any anchor was a single point of failure, but when intended to sustain 100x your weight well...


L
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Old 04-11-2020, 04:49 PM   #19
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The problem with a swivel is that you can't fully inspect the inside mechanism where corrosion lurks.
I believe the Mantus S series swivels can be disassembled for inspection.

https://youtu.be/k_DcEtcqcRU
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Old 04-11-2020, 05:31 PM   #20
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Mooring assembly video. / Len


https://www.offcenterharbor.com/hm-h...moorings-1804/


See pg 122 of Hamilton Marine catalog


https://www.magazooms.com/HTML5/Hami...r-Catalog-2020
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