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Old 11-28-2016, 08:45 AM   #21
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Sanded to bare teak, using Cetol Marine. How many coats should I put, should I sand between coats, how long to wait between coats, is there a top coat I should put on.
Done my share of wood over the years and am NOT a fan of Cetol, I used it only once. It just does not look right ...... going with

Le Tonkinios Linseed Varnish this time around and I like the way it lays up and looks. FB
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Old 11-28-2016, 10:47 AM   #22
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You're in Mexico right?
Yep. Mazatlan. The laborers working in the yard earn $100 per week. Complete refit. Reglassed hull. Opened and cleaned fuel tanks. Repaint entire boat. Refurbish canvas. New props. New top end both engines. Bottom end port engine. New nav housing expertly made with fiberglass. Replaced cracked windows. Repaint and rebuild davit. Sand deck and replace missing plugs. Varnish all outside wood. Replace refer and freezer. Replace toilet hoses. Check my blog page MVDarlin
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Old 11-28-2016, 10:58 AM   #23
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Ex Sailor,
I've mixed a lot of my own linseed oil for our teak on the Willard and had mixed results. Works fairly well but a bit sticky for a few weeks and that is about half of it's time between coats. I used raw linseed oil, not purified and on the first few coats thinned w turpentine. Perhaps it wouldn't have been sticky if I had used boiled linseed oil on later coats. Easy to use if you don't mask. When it gets on hard surfaces like paint or gel-coat it attracts a lot of dirt and looks terrible. But if one recoats often enough it protects the wood and gives it the warm wood look most like. I also added about 10 % oil varnish after the soak-in coats.

This Tonkinios site reads a little like a snake oil presentation but I've seen it before .. enen on TF. Most here think oil based stuff is just too old school to be any good .. out w the old in w the new. But we prefer it.

Sure wish you could buy a can of paint w the ingredients listed on the can. It was required by law in the past. Phenolic resin and tung oil or what. Tonkinios dosn't say specifically what's in their product either. I learned years ago phenolic resin and tung oil was the best resin and oil. The vehicle was listed and the percentages of all were there for all to see. Make a cheap varnish? Sure. Just put in more vehicle (solvent) and less resin and oil. No way to tell now.

But I'd like to use some Tonkinios oil and see how it goes.
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Old 11-28-2016, 11:05 AM   #24
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Tried linseed oil on my home cedar deck once. What a mess. Took years to dry.
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Old 11-28-2016, 02:25 PM   #25
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MV did it turn black?
Linseed oil is fungus food they say.
Gotta keep at it.
But oils and oil base is easy to do and if you geep it up a varnish finish lasts for many years. Removing at the end is not fun though. 10 years?
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Old 11-28-2016, 03:39 PM   #26
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Don't use the original orange Cetol. Use the 'Natural Teak' Cetol, and then the Clear Gloss or Satin Gloss Cetol top coat. The whole idea is that the Cetol has pigment which tends to block UV; it also makes the finish darker with each ensuing coat. They also say that Cetol is more tolerant of leaks/water seeping under edges; I don't observe that that's true.

There is available both boiled and raw Linseed Oil. Neither is particularly UV resistant. The raw Linseed oil won't polymerize anytime soon and will remain sticky 'forever'. The boiled Linseed oil polymerizes in relatively short order and works perfectly well as an interior wood finish, though it is not terribly water resistant.
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Old 11-28-2016, 05:25 PM   #27
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Cetol Natural Teak two coats and two coats of clear. I like the color and it didn't turn orange. It's a shame that sanded teak doesn't keep its color- that wold be my favorite.

There are plenty of choices, this was the one that I liked and worked for us.

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Old 11-28-2016, 06:17 PM   #28
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uh oh
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Old 11-28-2016, 06:19 PM   #29
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You all make me glad to have gone stainless.

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Old 12-04-2016, 07:29 AM   #30
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I'm interested in the views of this group with regards to a "maintenance" coat of varnish on rails. Already have 8-12 (lost count) of varnish, the surface is very glossy, so Cetol not an option. Currently in a boatyard for some mechanical work and asked them to quote the above. The reply came back for 2 coats, stating that their sanding would remove one coat so would need 2 for added build-up. When I have done this my sanding has been much less aggressive, unless I waited too long and the gloss was gone. I would lightly sand the surface to rough it up so the new coat would adhere.
What says the group? (except Mark, he manages to get a good shine on his rails without lifting a brush!)
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Old 12-04-2016, 09:43 AM   #31
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If the varnished surface is nice and smooth all you should have to do is scuff the surface up with say a green scuffy pad to prep it for a coat of varnish.
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Old 12-04-2016, 11:52 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by bnoft View Post
I'm interested in the views of this group with regards to a "maintenance" coat of varnish on rails. Already have 8-12 (lost count) of varnish, the surface is very glossy, so Cetol not an option. Currently in a boatyard for some mechanical work and asked them to quote the above. The reply came back for 2 coats, stating that their sanding would remove one coat so would need 2 for added build-up. When I have done this my sanding has been much less aggressive, unless I waited too long and the gloss was gone. I would lightly sand the surface to rough it up so the new coat would adhere.
What says the group? (except Mark, he manages to get a good shine on his rails without lifting a brush!)
I too have many coats on the rails, as I NEVER take any significant amount off when sanding, unless there is damage. In those places I try to put back the same depth of varnish as in the surrounding area, though I rarely get that much new varnish on before it starts to look great again.

I have used 400 grit paper to lightly scuff and I usually add only a single coat. Though if I don't have a can of Epifanes handy and feel the need to add a different brand of varnish, it takes two or even three coats for the same thickness of new. This makes Epifanes, at the top of the market for price per can, come down to below the other guys for price per recoat.

I would hesitate to let a yard sand and varnish if they want to take off at least one coat. That tells me they haven't looked at your boat and are quoting based upon what they expect to find, in a one size fits all application. The look of the boat when leaving the yard will likely be good with that approach, but at needless expense, and where they have taken too much off, 2 coats won't leave much durability and you will be recoating again before very long.
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Old 12-04-2016, 11:55 AM   #33
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The most important part of any painting / varnishing is a clean surface. A light scrub with a green Scotch Bright pad (as Capt. Bill stated) with warm water a little dawn and some TSP will give you a surface ready to refinish. (Providing the surface is in half decent condition to start with) Just lightly scrub rinse well and let dry o-night.
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Old 12-04-2016, 12:09 PM   #34
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The most important part of any painting / varnishing is a clean surface. A light scrub with a green Scotch Bright pad (as Capt. Bill stated) with warm water a little dawn and some TSP will give you a surface ready to refinish. (Providing the surface is in half decent condition to start with) Just lightly scrub rinse well and let dry o-night.
Personally I'd stay away from the TSP. Over kill as far as a cleaner is concerned.

And if you have teak decks it can darken them where it might spill on to them as you use it.
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Old 12-04-2016, 12:19 PM   #35
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It is strong stuff. I use just a teaspoon in a gallon or more of water.
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Old 12-04-2016, 01:10 PM   #36
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Ex Sailor,
I've mixed a lot of my own linseed oil for our teak on the Willard and had mixed results. Works fairly well but a bit sticky for a few weeks and that is about half of it's time between coats. I used raw linseed oil, not purified and on the first few coats thinned w turpentine. Perhaps it wouldn't have been sticky if I had used boiled linseed oil on later coats. Easy to use if you don't mask. When it gets on hard surfaces like paint or gel-coat it attracts a lot of dirt and looks terrible. But if one recoats often enough it protects the wood and gives it the warm wood look most like. I also added about 10 % oil varnish after the soak-in coats.

This Tonkinios site reads a little like a snake oil presentation but I've seen it before .. enen on TF. Most here think oil based stuff is just too old school to be any good .. out w the old in w the new. But we prefer it.

Sure wish you could buy a can of paint w the ingredients listed on the can. It was required by law in the past. Phenolic resin and tung oil or what. Tonkinios dosn't say specifically what's in their product either. I learned years ago phenolic resin and tung oil was the best resin and oil. The vehicle was listed and the percentages of all were there for all to see. Make a cheap varnish? Sure. Just put in more vehicle (solvent) and less resin and oil. No way to tell now.

But I'd like to use some Tonkinios oil and see how it goes.
To be truthful, they all sound like snake oil .... I got the idea from a " wooden boat " forum and figured if it's good enough for them, it's good enough for me. The maker of Tonkinios claims that it's flexible ( will not crack and has good UV ) I am done with my railings, it takes about 12 hrs to dry and flows real easy. Well .... we shall see ........ FB
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