Alwood Application Process?

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Serene

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2014
Messages
351
Location
Australia
Vessel Name
Serene
Vessel Make
Blue Seas 36
I am nearly at a point where I will go ahead and use the Alwood system for the teak on my boat. It has all been stripped to bare wood and sanded with 80grit so far.

Doing research to ensure I have the best chance of a good outcome, have come up with the following;

Alwood MA Primer Yellow (J9809)
Awlwood Multi-Climate Gloss (J4000)

- Primer applied directly to wood
- Raw wood sanded no finer than 120 grit then cleaned off thoroughly
- One coat of primer is required
- When primer is ‘thumb print’ tacky, start applying clear (touch it and it leaves a print, but does not come off on finger)
- Do not use de-natured alcohol during coating system as it can cause failures (Alwood is moisture cured so alcohol will remove moisture and cause curing problems)
- After applying one (and only one) coat of primer, on the same day lightly sand with 220 grit and then get first coat of clear on
- Use up to 10% of the primer in the build up coats of gloss
- Final coats should be straight clear
- 8 to 10 coats of clear advised over the primer
- If applied the same day, no need to sand between coats (approximately 2hrs @ 25c)
- Alwood can be brushed, rolled or sprayed
- Brushes will tend to swell after a while, but you throw and replace... ideally use solvent resistant foam brushes
- There is a spray reducer and a brushing reducer available
- Any coat that dries overnight needs a light sand with 220 grit or 320 grit

Q. What is the average thumb print / dry time for the primer and also the clear coat?
A. For Awlwood primers it will be touch dry in 8 hours at 25 degrees celsius (77F). For the clear coat it will be touch dry after 2 hours at 25 degrees celsius (77F).

Does anybody see any issues with the above plan?

I have two questions;

1. When is the reducer required?

2. Should the primer bet left to dry and then sanded, or should the first coat of clear be applied right on top of the primer when it is 'thumb print' tacky. What is correct?

Anything else I should be aware of?
 
I put down the primer. I then let it cure for 24 hours. I then sand and clean. I put down the first coat of gloss and let it sit for 24 hours. I then sand and clean again. I usually lay down the second coat of gloss at 8am. I do an additional coat of gloss every two hours. I usually do my work in the spring were I have longer days which allows me to get 6 coats done. The last coat is done at 6pm. If the dew sets in before the last coat is done it will fog. If it fogs, you will need to sand and do another final coat.

I do not use reducer. If you want a mirror like finish then you will need to use reducer to get the gloss to flow perfectly. I have always been happy with my results but reducer would improve the smoothness of the finish.

If you get bubbles from the teak off gassing as the day heats up, stop. Let it cure for 24 hours. Sand all the bubbles out. Wait till the evening and apply one coat of gloss and let that cure for 24 hours. Sand, clean and go back to applying gloss.
 
I did not use any reducer. Waipe and vacuum after sanding. I allowed the primer to dry then next day lightly sanded with 220 grit. The primer can raise the grain to a small degree. After sanding, wipe down and vacuum. I did not add any primer to the gloss coats. First two gloss coats allowed to dry overnight then lightly sanded, wiped and vacuumed. Most of the next coats were 2 per day, no sanding between coats unless overnight drying. I used 320 or 400 when I did sand. Last two coats one per day only. If wood is in direct sun, wait until temp starts to drop (ie afternoon) before applying coats. Particularly for primer and initial gloss coats. Otherwise you can get microbubbles. Only pour out enough product that can be applied in about 20 minutes. It is quite thin, and goes down quickly so you cover a lot of rail in that time. Brushes and rollers remain workable for at least an hour.

I used brushes and rollers once only. In theory you can use the brush cleaner product, however you then need to wash the brush cleaner out very thoroughly as it will inhibit drying of the coats if any remains. Be careful not to overwork by going back over with brush or roller. Just get it covered and move on...

Pour just enough product (primer or gloss) into your working pot for one coat. Recap main container immediately. Do not return any unused product from your working pot back to main container or you risk it kicking off in the main container. By the time you have 7 or 8 coats on the surface should be getting smooth and shiny.

You can buff/polish & wax the final coat after it has had a couple of days to dry.
 
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Awesome info. Thanks for the replies. Boat is inside a shed so no worries about sunlight/heat.

Will read in more detail shortly.
 
I picked up an application sheet at the Annapolis Boat Show last month that states : Allow 4 to 8 hours for primer to tack dry/ touch dry.Apply 1st coat of gloss un-thinned

Day 2 sand 1st coat
 
I was just at the boatyard and per chance the AkzoNobel rep came down to colour sample the white for matching.

Had a good chat with him about the Awlwood and he discussed application process with me and the painter.

Product has been ordered and aim is to get the primer and first coat of gloss on ASAP so the teak is sealed while the white painting is done.

Then we will come back and do the subsequent clear build coats later.

I am going to be the painter's apprentice while he does the Awlwood so I can learn from him to be able to maintain and do any future Awlwood application as required.
 
Sounds lime a good plan. Pick up anything from the rep not noted above?
 
Sounds lime a good plan. Pick up anything from the rep not noted above?

Couple of things;

1. He didn't want to look at my notes as captured from posters on this site, he was only interested in the official Awlwood documentation I had printed.

2. He said to lay down the primer and first coat of gloss in one day, rather than wait until the next day.

3. He talked a lot about the micro-bubbles and the teak off-gassing in sun/heat.

4. He said the reducer is not really needed.

5. He didn't say anything about adding 10% primer to the first few coats of gloss.

6. He was clear on not putting any product back in the can due to the moisture cure process and the catalyst already being in the paint.

7. He said when sanding, be careful on edges to not break through the coats already applied.
 
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Our plan is to do the final sanding with 120 grit, then lay down the yellow primer and first coat of gloss in one day.

Then we wait until all of the white areas have been sprayed, then do the last gloss coats right at the end when no other painting/sanding is being done.

Will start as soon as the product arrives. Have ordered one can of the yellow primer and four cans of the gloss.
 
I let the primer sit overnight. Then sand and apply as many coats of gloss as light and drying allow without sanding. Then final 2 coats sand and thin with reducer. We found the thinning made a smoother flow so very little sanding was needed for the final coat.
 
I let the primer sit overnight. Then sand and apply as many coats of gloss as light and drying allow without sanding. Then final 2 coats sand and thin with reducer. We found the thinning made a smoother flow so very little sanding was needed for the final coat.

Thanks. We need to get the primer and first coast of gloss applied, then will come back later for the remaining gloss coats after the white areas has been painted.

Want to seal the raw teak before any white gets sprayed.
 
Teak has been sanded to 120 grit and just waiting for the product to arrive to get started.
 
Hi - my experience
No need to mix 10% primer into gloss
Do not repot , it will create problems
Do not sand after primer coat, get a couple of layers of gloss on first
We are located just north of Newcastle, Aust and I found two coats per day was about all I could manage as it did not seem to dry that quick. But I do note comments above about inappropriate solvents messing with the process so will go to single use brushes in future.
A light sand between coats did not take very long but improved the finish significantly
I am not a very fussy person but we do get a lot of comments about the appearance of the brightwork.
 
Hi - my experience
No need to mix 10% primer into gloss
Do not repot , it will create problems
Do not sand after primer coat, get a couple of layers of gloss on first
We are located just north of Newcastle, Aust and I found two coats per day was about all I could manage as it did not seem to dry that quick. But I do note comments above about inappropriate solvents messing with the process so will go to single use brushes in future.
A light sand between coats did not take very long but improved the finish significantly
I am not a very fussy person but we do get a lot of comments about the appearance of the brightwork.

Thank you. Good feedback.
 
hi - most of the details have been covered so I will add what I have found.
1. do not open the can by ripping out the centre as per recommendation. Simple take a sharp spike and punch a small whole in the top of the bit that is designed to be removed. Now upend can and shake the product out through the little whole - yes its a bit slow but it prevents the reaction from starting as very little air gets into the can. As soon as you have enough wipe the outside of the can around the thread dry. Then put the cap on. Just keep getting small amounts that will keep you supplied for the next 10 minutes . Makes it flow easier as its fresh product the whole time. This also prevents the cap from glueing itself to the thread. If you persist with this system you can make the shelf life way longer for unused part cans. some of mine are three years opened and are still workable.
2. Brushes - you have to chuck the brush - cleaning is not economic - if you are trying to overcoat in a few hours - then as soon as you finish wrap the brush in glad wrap immediately. When you want to start again in an hour or so - unwrap and use a tin with a small amount of brushing thinners to freshen the tips - brush out on something consumable - then go for it. End of day you have no hope of keeping it till the morning.
3. Price - this stuff was way cheaper till the AkzoNobel bought it. Price doubled as a result with the new brand name - its good but you need to make sure you get the most out of what you buy - thats why you need to the shake and wipe system.

Never underestimate the creative power of DIY boat maintenance.
 
Started the Alwood application process yesterday with the primer and first coat of gloss. Sanded this morning with 400grit then applied two more coats of gloss. Another five coats of gloss to go, then will assess the finish.

Planning on applying two coats of gloss per day after sanding each morning.

The final coat 'may' be thinned with reducer to have it flow better, but will decide that as we get closer.

Have been pretty happy with the application process.

Here are a couple of progress pics after the third coat of gloss was applied.
 

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Also, the AkzoNobel rep was on-site again and I had another chat with him and learned something I did not previously appreciate. I thought the multi-climate gloss was used for tropical locations because it had some sort of extra UV inhibitors included, thus it would last longer in these environments.

But, the difference is in viscosity to help it flow and take longer to cure in higher temp/humidity areas when being applied.

Otherwise there is no difference.

So we are using the regular gloss and will decide if we want to use the multi-climate for the final coat if we need it to flow better and/or take longer to cure.
 
For products that are prone to spoiling due to air in the container you can float inert gas to displace the moisture laden air. I use argon from my tig torch, but this stuff here will do the same thing : https://www.amazon.com/Bloxygen-Pre...fias4eYunNwAj0G5NQrI0p2lTMd-BxmYaAjOWEALw_wcB

Use it for paints, hardeners, etc… anything that will cure in the can.
Some of the paints I buy are eye wateringly expensive and I don’t want to lose a drop.
 
The killer to Awlwood is water getting under it and lifting the finish off the wood. After I am done applying the final coat I go back and caulk any seams between the Awlwood and the boat to prevent water intrusion.
 
The killer to Awlwood is water getting under it and lifting the finish off the wood. After I am done applying the final coat I go back and caulk any seams between the Awlwood and the boat to prevent water intrusion.

That’s a good tip, I do the same, even with cetol. I use the mahogany colored stuff. It really finishes it off nicely, as well as protecting the edges from water intrusion.
 
The killer to Awlwood is water getting under it and lifting the finish off the wood. After I am done applying the final coat I go back and caulk any seams between the Awlwood and the boat to prevent water intrusion.

Thanks for the tip. I have a few areas where this may be necessary.
 
One coat of yellow primer and eight coats of gloss Alwood now complete! I was taking a pic of the duckboard, but you can see the Alwood in the top right corner of the pic. Very happy with the product, ease of application and final finish.
 

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Here is a better pic. The newly painted white is Awlgrip Signal White.
 

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I love the stuff.
I sand to 120, vacuum, clean,
Prime, let it set for 6 to 8 hours pending the temps.
First coat of clear goes on, I don’t sand the primer coat, no reducer.
I then let it sit for 24 hours. Sand with 220 very light, don’t bust through the first coat. Then apply one coat in the am, one in the Pm. Next day, light sand, two more coats.
Build to 5, then sand down flat. Then build 5 more coats.
Then sand down flat, I use 220 and a block, by hand.
Last two coats I add 10% reducer. I then let it sit for a week, hit it with a buffer.
I use rollers, brush. I just toss the rollers & brush, it cost more to clean them then they cost, better that way, no chance of contamination.
 

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The killer to Awlwood is water getting under it and lifting the finish off the wood. After I am done applying the final coat I go back and caulk any seams between the Awlwood and the boat to prevent water intrusion.

+1

A very thorough re-caulk is IMHO as essential as the initial Awlwood application. We had a good yard do the entire job and it was long lasting and fabulous looking especially for a vessel berthed outdoors in the wet PNW.
 
Hi— I am about to start this process on my 05 gb 42 eu. Varnish was in pretty good shape when we bought in oct 2022. Admit I didn’t do anything to it but now it looks like madrona bark in late summer. Especially the transom and the eyebrow around the flybridge.
I’m planning on awl-gripping the eyebrow gb white. Going to try Awlwood 4000 on the transom, when I remove the existing flaking varnish. We’ll see how it goes then will address the cap rails which are not nearly as bad but don’t want to put on varnish that I’m gonna just scrape off

I’ve read this good thread and others and have a few follow up qs. Could start a new thread but it seems it might help others if it was all here.

—Best way to remove old varnish? Have a heat gun and carbide and cabinet scrapers. Any specific tips on that?
— sanding tips? I have a block and a da sander 5” with good 120.
—repairing dings, have a couple in the transom, and at least one “splinter” that I’d rather epoxy down than remove and fill. Teak dust filled epoxy? Sand out and ignore?
—caulking. Figured out before I googled it that the varnish starts to fail where it meets other stuff like fiberglass or a seam and water gets under it. No caulking I can see on my transom. I’m sold on a thin clean bead of black but what is the very best caulk for this transition - life caulk ? A sika product? Not there yet, obvi
—any other advice? Planning to roll the yellow primer and maybe use a foam brush or a rag for the grooves. Then roll and maybe tip the clear gloss. Willing to burn more expensive rollers and brushes if that will give the best result. Not planning to try to clean them.
Thanks!
 
Heat is easiest, you shouldn’t need the DA, if you use it go light. I prefer Sikaflex

I do everything with foam brushes. The secret is picking the right weather and time of day. You don’t want the teak off gassing while you are working. Also, dew will cloud the finish so you don’t want to work to late.
 
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