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Old 08-02-2018, 08:11 PM   #21
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Unfortunately, no one in the US or Canada is willing to pay for selectively-harvested lumber, thus clear-cutting, thus forestry monoculture, thus unhealthy forests. The myth of "sustained yield" forestry was disproved decades ago, but....
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Simply not true.

We selectively timbered our land decades ago and we are not the only ones to do so. Some parcels have been cleared cut but they have not been planted as a mono culture either.

Our land is useless for farming and has never been farmed. It has only grown trees, supported wildlife and hidden moonshine stills since Europeans came into the area centuries ago. Prior to the Europeans, it only grew trees and wildlife. A neighboring parcel was farmed at one time but it has been been a forest again for the last century or so. It too has been selectively harvested but nobody would know but the owners and neighbors.

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Old 08-02-2018, 10:32 PM   #22
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Simply not true.



We selectively timbered our land decades ago and we are not the only ones to do so. Some parcels have been cleared cut but they have not been planted as a mono culture either.



Our land is useless for farming and has never been farmed. It has only grown trees, supported wildlife and hidden moonshine stills since Europeans came into the area centuries ago. Prior to the Europeans, it only grew trees and wildlife. A neighboring parcel was farmed at one time but it has been been a forest again for the last century or so. It too has been selectively harvested but nobody would know but the owners and neighbors.



Later,

Dan


In general, there isnít nearly as much profit in selective harvesting as there is in clearcutting. So while small landowners may selectively harvest and there are boutique logging operations that will do it, there isnít nearly as much money to be made in that arena.

Growing up in the land of Weyerhaeuser I was indoctrinated into the idea that clearcutting and replanting was perfectly responsible. Most of the time, the clear cuts that I see are still being replanted with Douglas Fir. Even though Weyerhaeuser runs seed farms that produce seeds for a variety of PNW trees, I havenít seen clear cuts that have been planted with anything but a monoculture.
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Old 08-03-2018, 12:21 AM   #23
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A contingent of almost 200 expert Australian and New Zealand firefighters leave today to help with fires affecting 3 different areas of USA.

We are in a dry El Nino phase, looks like a bad fire season coming. Lots of preparatory burning off in selected areas,with consequent air pollution in Sydney.Plus there is a fire burning at Holsworthy Army Base, in the area used for practice live fire. Not all items fired explode, firefighters have to tread carefully with a fire that would normally be extinguished long ago,and no longer polluting Sydney.
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Old 08-03-2018, 06:22 AM   #24
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The "forests" of BC have changed immensely due to logging. Most of the old growth cedar is gone, simply because it is difficult to replant. After clearcutting, or even any aggressive selective logging, a cedar forest struggles to regrow.

Have a walk through an old growth cedar forest. The ground layer is often made up of thick mosses and lichens that act as a giant sponge holding in the moisture. This layer is a very fragile and necessary part of the forest. Once torn up by logging an exposed to the sun, it is gone. Cedars will struggle to grow even if they are replanted. The forest loses its wet sponge base and any wildfires will burn much hotter. Heavy rains after logging now causes severe erosion and mudslides. The rich soil ends up in the once clear rivers.

Replanting pines and firs does not fix anything. Each process of logging and replanting results in a less healthy crop of trees. The soil left in some areas barely supports tree suitable for fenceposts. Its a sad situation.
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Old 08-03-2018, 05:02 PM   #25
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We're going through a period of very dense Sahara dust (no kidding!) in the Caribbean right now. It is very fine and coats the boat in a Martian-like powder, at times limiting visibility and bothering those allergic to it.
On the positive side, it makes for some incredible sunsets!
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Old 08-03-2018, 06:44 PM   #26
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The "forests" of BC have changed immensely due to logging. Most of the old growth cedar is gone, simply because it is difficult to replant. After clearcutting, or even any aggressive selective logging, a cedar forest struggles to regrow.

Have a walk through an old growth cedar forest. The ground layer is often made up of thick mosses and lichens that act as a giant sponge holding in the moisture. This layer is a very fragile and necessary part of the forest. Once torn up by logging an exposed to the sun, it is gone. Cedars will struggle to grow even if they are replanted. The forest loses its wet sponge base and any wildfires will burn much hotter. Heavy rains after logging now causes severe erosion and mudslides. The rich soil ends up in the once clear rivers.

Replanting pines and firs does not fix anything. Each process of logging and replanting results in a less healthy crop of trees. The soil left in some areas barely supports tree suitable for fenceposts. Its a sad situation.
I don't know which part of BC you are referring to, but it certainly isn't the southern coastal areas where I live. Here Cedars grow like weeds. The market for Cedar is poor at the best of times, with Doug Fir and other SPF wood being higher value by far, but frequently choked out by the much more prolific Cedars.

Those who know which soils and climactic conditions are most favourable to each specie can easily identify the places Cedar will be found in abundance. Likewise Doug Fir and others. Hopefully that knowledge is well known to the foresters of the province.

To digress a bit, I just watched another fully loaded ship carrying logs running down Houstoun Passage in front of my house. No doubt going offshore to make high value jobs for others.

Rant over.
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Old 08-08-2018, 11:10 AM   #27
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While driving to the office this morning, the smoke from the Washington fires can be seen hanging over Puget Sound.Click image for larger version

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