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Old 03-23-2018, 05:29 AM   #81
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I remain with a previously-posted opinion that if I don't smell diesel, I'm not on a trawler.
If you smell diesel, you've got a leak.



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Old 03-23-2018, 07:15 AM   #82
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Old 03-23-2018, 03:08 PM   #83
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If you smell diesel, you've got a leak.



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No, you HAD a leak. The smell stays forever and I LOVE it. Without that smell I wasted money on the boat......
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Old 03-23-2018, 07:33 PM   #84
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And...?

Seems like the OBs are now 3 feet further away.

Ssobol: After having several outboard boats (as you know ) I really like having the clean and uncluttered transom. It's easier for entry/exit, swimming, dinghy storage etc. If my current boat had outboards I feel like they would get in the way.
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Old 03-24-2018, 12:56 AM   #85
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Ssobol: After having several outboard boats (as you know ) I really like having the clean and uncluttered transom. It's easier for entry/exit, swimming, dinghy storage etc. If my current boat had outboards I feel like they would get in the way.
I guess it depends on the layout of the back of the boat. If the boat is wide enough you can have a swim platform on either side of the motor(s). Or you can have a swim step between the motors if they are separated. You could also have a bracket (e.g. Armstrong) that sets the motors away from the transom and can be used as a swim step. You could also store the dinghy on the bracket.

IMO the benefits of OB power outweigh the slight inconvenience of the swim step issue. But to each their own.

In my case I have a swim step on each side of the OB motor.
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Old 03-24-2018, 02:02 AM   #86
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If you smell diesel, you've got a leak.



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Probably you've never had a diesel engine.
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Old 03-24-2018, 02:20 AM   #87
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Ssobol: After having several outboard boats (as you know ) I really like having the clean and uncluttered transom. It's easier for entry/exit, swimming, dinghy storage etc. If my current boat had outboards I feel like they would get in the way.
Yes! How else would it be so easy for a boating pal to park his soft dinghy on the "swimming" platorm?
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Old 03-24-2018, 06:55 AM   #88
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"If you smell diesel, you've got a leak"

If you smell gasoline your in a bomb!
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Old 03-24-2018, 10:09 AM   #89
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"If you smell diesel, you've got a leak"

If you smell gasoline your in a bomb!
If you smell gasoline you have not been careful enough on a gas powered boat.

And, yes... if ample amount of gasoline fumes get into a contained area there is for sure a very dangerous explosion potential. Gasoline as a liquid does not itself explode, gas fumes evaporating off/from that liquid can volatilely explode. That's why efficient natural-ventilation layouts and good bilge-blowers [that you often use] are top of the "safety list "on a gas boat. As well, by often checking [sniffing] confined areas where fumes could congregate if a leak happens - your nose knows. Additionally, fume detectors are available... but... don't get too comfortable with only relying on a detector, failures do occur. Your nose is the real tester to be believed!

If you smell diesel... well... that's because diesel odor lingers and its smell permeates.

On diesel powered boats you may often have the heavy smell of diesel fuel... no matter how tight things are kept nor how clean the engine runs. Then there's the odor of diesel exhaust and soot particulates from cold to running temp. But - you probably have a top-end MPG efficiency engine for boating with very little chance of fuel fire [although there are ways for fuel fires in diesel engine compartment to occur]. That said: You also do not have to be concerned about Carbon Monoxide [CO] contained in gasoline exhaust - the silent odorless killer! However - you do have the diesel engine noise that is usually more noticeable than fairly quite running gas engine sounds. Engine compartment and sole insulation can minimize that noise occurrence for both combustion engine types

Summation:

On gasoline powered boats you should never have ANY smell of the fuel aboard. If you do, check things out and take action IMMEDIATELY! Exhaust of good running engine is basically odorless from start to finish. No soot/particulates. Not quite as efficient a fuel source as diesel. [and, odorless exhaust CO must never be underestimated - it can kill]. Newer gasoline engine designs seem to be getting more efficient, a bit safer.

On diesel powered boats you can enjoy the aroma of fuel and exhaust and diesel combustion noise. Newer diesel engine designs seem to be getting more efficient and quiter.

Would be great if an even more efficient combustion engine on an improved type of fuel could be engineered/designed/created that has the best attributes of diesel and gasoline... all wrapped into one!

We boaters can always continue doing one thing we are great at... Dream-ON!!

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Old 03-24-2018, 01:38 PM   #90
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There is a myth that you can't get CO poisoning from diesel exhaust. Granted the amount of CO in diesel exhaust is less than from gasoline exhaust, there is still CO present. And it can still kill you (maybe just not as fast).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18643868

https://www.overdriveonline.com/in-c...-from-fiction/
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Old 03-24-2018, 03:32 PM   #91
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Probably you've never had a diesel engine.

Bad guess. We had a (one) diesel before, and we have two now.

No diesel odor.

Usually.

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Old 03-24-2018, 05:09 PM   #92
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There is a myth that you can't get CO poisoning from diesel exhaust. Granted the amount of CO in diesel exhaust is less than from gasoline exhaust, there is still CO present. And it can still kill you (maybe just not as fast).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18643868

https://www.overdriveonline.com/in-c...-from-fiction/
ss - Interesting couple of reviews. Thanks

That opens my eyes better to "potential" [however small it may be] of CO from diesel fuel as being a dangerous enough content to cause death.

Albeit, as second link eludes: For CO in dangerous amount from burned diesel would need to be exacerbated by very badly tuned engine and exhaust entering a considerably air tight location. Seems that engine running to mfg specs would create only very small amount of CO... not enough to be dangerous

Statement toward end of first link [regarding diesel trucks]: "Lastly, an extensive literature review produced no scientifically reported cases of fatal CO poisoning attributed to diesel fuel exhaust."
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Old 03-24-2018, 06:20 PM   #93
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One of the strangest vessels I saw last year was a pretty large sailboat, with no mast or rigging. It had a 70hp or so outboard mounted on a bracket/swim platform. It was cruising at a pretty good clip. The captain looked to be 7 ft tall, he was huge.

When they hit my wake (not a huge wake by any means) the boat went wonky, the big guy almost lost his footing, and the roll was incredible. I guess sailboats are meant to be pulled not pushed.
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Old 03-24-2018, 07:20 PM   #94
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One of the strangest vessels I saw last year was a pretty large sailboat, with no mast or rigging. It had a 70hp or so outboard mounted on a bracket/swim platform. It was cruising at a pretty good clip. The captain looked to be 7 ft tall, he was huge.

When they hit my wake (not a huge wake by any means) the boat went wonky, the big guy almost lost his footing, and the roll was incredible. I guess sailboats are meant to be pulled not pushed.
While it may be hard to imagine, the mast of a sailboat adds a lot to its stability even with out the sails up
.

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Old 03-25-2018, 06:47 AM   #95
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"I guess sailboats are meant to be pulled not pushed."

A more accurate concept,

"While it may be hard to imagine, the mast of a sailboat adds a lot to its stability even with out the sails up"

Yes, fishing schooners working the Grand Banks would hoist an anchor part way up a mast to slow the roll.
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Old 03-25-2018, 08:34 AM   #96
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In my poor addled, feeble mind, the forward open cockpit may SOUND like a good idea until the weather goes down hill then, everyone wants to go aft for some protection. Why not just cap it and make it part of the below deck space.
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Old 03-25-2018, 04:06 PM   #97
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ss - Interesting couple of reviews. Thanks

That opens my eyes better to "potential" [however small it may be] of CO from diesel fuel as being a dangerous enough content to cause death.

Albeit, as second link eludes: For CO in dangerous amount from burned diesel would need to be exacerbated by very badly tuned engine and exhaust entering a considerably air tight location. Seems that engine running to mfg specs would create only very small amount of CO... not enough to be dangerous

Statement toward end of first link [regarding diesel trucks]: "Lastly, an extensive literature review produced no scientifically reported cases of fatal CO poisoning attributed to diesel fuel exhaust."
I thought the Nazis used submarine diesels to gas people as well as gassing vans before they switched to ZxyklonB? Iím pretty sure the science is documented on that...... The vans might have been gasoline but the sub motors were certainly diesel. And they killed 10ís of thousands with them.
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Old 03-25-2018, 04:49 PM   #98
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While it may be hard to imagine, the mast of a sailboat adds a lot to its stability even with out the sails up
.

Ted


I can confirm this fact.
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Old 03-25-2018, 05:28 PM   #99
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I thought the Nazis used submarine diesels to gas people as well as gassing vans before they switched to ZxyklonB? I’m pretty sure the science is documented on that...... The vans might have been gasoline but the sub motors were certainly diesel. And they killed 10’s of thousands with them.
A friend of my brother almost lost 2 of his kids, the big aft door was open on his diesel powered cruiser, kids down in the boat, the kids got real quiet, father came down from the fly bridge to see them overcome with diesel CO. He used the VHF to seek medical help from a doctor on the water. The kids were fine after being move to the fresh air while waiting for the medical help to arrive.
He eliminated the future problems by installing a household CO detector to supplement the standard detector.
Based on that example, I installed a household detector. They now have detectors that are sealed and advertised to have 5 years batteries.
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Old 03-25-2018, 07:46 PM   #100
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For many years I had heard diesel exhaust was not so much filled with CO to bother to worry too much about it; unlike gasoline exhaust that holds much CO and to be very worried. Now, I hear that diesel fuel exhaust, although with less CO content than gasoline, is also dangerous and could kill under some conditions.


Can't help but to wonder annual fatality-count from diesel exhaust fumes as compared to gasoline exhaust fumes?? Anyone know easy way to find stats on this comparison?
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