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Old 09-09-2017, 12:12 PM   #81
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https://youtu.be/mJVX0ZP_pig

Like anything else with a little practice
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Old 09-10-2017, 02:37 AM   #82
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Originally Posted by Mitlenatch View Post
I need to ask another question to everyone and especially Dave as he has the same boat I would like to get. I have been boating since I was 9 and comfortable on the water. All my boats have been outboards or inboard/outboards. My current boat is a 35 bayliner with twin ib/ob and I can manuover it with ease in tight quarters. As someone mentioned elsewhere, practice and get comfortable with your boat. I'm wondering how difficult (or different) it is with a single screw and rudder. I understand the physics of it but I'm not sure how easy it would be to get a boat into a tight spot without the thrusters. I know I could get the bow in but it would seem problematic to get the stern to do what I want. Thanks in advance.


I would expect that you would have an easier time making the transition than I did. I only had experience with sailboats. With a large rubber and fin keel, the sailboat turns on a dime. With your experience with the in/on singles, you should adjust pretty quickly.

It is possible to move the NP stern around pretty well. Hard rubber and a shot of power will shove it sideways. There is also some prop walk that you learn to use to your advantage pretty quickly.

Keep in mind, I have both a bow and stern thruster and I am happy to use them as needed. The bow thruster is the most useful but I am also happy to have the stern thruster.

I found that it was easier than I had thought and that I had worried about it unnecessarily.
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Old 09-10-2017, 09:43 AM   #83
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If you are getting the same boat that Dave has then it will likely have a thruster. It is hard to find boats like that (or single NTs) without a thruster. I had a Prairie 29 that had a tremendous amount of windage and no thruster and it is truly the foundation of my boat handling skills....meaning I learned a LOT!!! I remember I bought the boat in Mississippi and just showed up and drove it to Texas. The first time I hopped aboard I felt like a 3 legged cat trying to bury a turd on a frozen pond. But I got it figured out. ALways use the forces of nature(wind, current, etc.) and physics(prop walk) in your favor.

You'll get it figured out!!!
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Old 09-12-2017, 05:22 PM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitlenatch View Post
I need to ask another question to everyone and especially Dave as he has the same boat I would like to get. I have been boating since I was 9 and comfortable on the water. All my boats have been outboards or inboard/outboards. My current boat is a 35 bayliner with twin ib/ob and I can manuover it with ease in tight quarters. As someone mentioned elsewhere, practice and get comfortable with your boat. I'm wondering how difficult (or different) it is with a single screw and rudder. I understand the physics of it but I'm not sure how easy it would be to get a boat into a tight spot without the thrusters. I know I could get the bow in but it would seem problematic to get the stern to do what I want. Thanks in advance.
Hi Mitlenatch,

I went from a single duoprop 25' Skipjack to a twin screw Carver C34. I have not taken possession of my NP45 yet so I am actually nerviness about going back to a single screw. The reason for my apprehension is my Skipjack had an outdrive which moved the prop to steer the boat. A trawler has a rudder that steers the boat. So it's really a completely different thing. I've watched trawlers dock and they drive right in, much the same as my Skipjack with its outdrive did. My twin screw inboard is a pain to dock. There are multiple methods non of which are straight in. I found twin screws to be a pain. You can't use the rudders at slow speed so you have to depend on manipulating the props. One forward and the other backward to spin the boat on its axis etc.. As you well know you can actually do much more with twin props but it takes a while to get good at it. So you and I are in the same predicament. We are both going from twin screws to a single and are worried about it. I would also like to hear from the trawler owners about docking.

Cheers!
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Old 09-12-2017, 09:44 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by dirtdoc1 View Post
Hi Mitlenatch,

I went from a single duoprop 25' Skipjack to a twin screw Carver C34. I have not taken possession of my NP45 yet so I am actually nerviness about going back to a single screw. The reason for my apprehension is my Skipjack had an outdrive which moved the prop to steer the boat. A trawler has a rudder that steers the boat. So it's really a completely different thing. I've watched trawlers dock and they drive right in, much the same as my Skipjack with its outdrive did. My twin screw inboard is a pain to dock. There are multiple methods non of which are straight in. I found twin screws to be a pain. You can't use the rudders at slow speed so you have to depend on manipulating the props. One forward and the other backward to spin the boat on its axis etc.. As you well know you can actually do much more with twin props but it takes a while to get good at it. So you and I are in the same predicament. We are both going from twin screws to a single and are worried about it. I would also like to hear from the trawler owners about docking.

Cheers!
Yes, I completely agree. With my twin legs it is very easy to control the boat. Can park it anywhere. I'm interested in the prop walk eveyone is talking about. I can see how the prop would do that, but I wonder how much it effects the boat and of course the prop walk is one direction forward and the other in reverse?
I am extremely jealous of your PN45 on order. I would just love to have one of those. Would have to sell the house and my daughter would be mad at me! I'm still hoping to look at a NP43. I have actually never seen one.

Cheers
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