Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-26-2019, 09:54 AM   #21
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by micsic View Post
Hi you may want to read this before getting a cored hull !!


https://www.yachtsurvey.com/bad_news_for_Bertram.htm
The Bertram situation isn't because of coring. It's because of horribly sloppy workmanship and it wasn't just one boat, but many Bertrams suffered delamination over a period of a few years. It was a total disaster and part of what led to their death, now resurrected by Gavio.

Sportfishing boats have a great emphasis on speed, performance, and fuel economy in achieving it. Therefore, coring makes a lot of sense. The other popular building technique used by custom builders is cold molding.
__________________
Advertisement

BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2019, 11:20 PM   #22
Guru
 
City: Anacortes
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 809
I owned a balsa cored (above the waterline) sport fish for a short time. It was a late 70ís build and well constructed such that 25 years later every ounce of that core was bone dry. For the period, the glass construction was thick enough to not need any coring, it was for all intents extra. That was the quietest, warmest, sure feeling hull Iíve owned. I was already aware that the biggest challenge was monitoring every single fastener newly drilled into that boat to ensure it would stay dry. What I did not expect was how it changed my attitude regarding the potential benefits a cored hull could bring, not just the liabilities. If I was building to my specs, money no option, Iíd seriously consider a cored hull above the waterline.
__________________

ghost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2019, 05:47 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
City: Pnw
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SARAH TOO
Vessel Model: 40’ beer can
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 178
I’m surprised to see pros for a cored hull. In my opinion wrapping wood with plastic and then putting it outdoors is a death sentence for the wood. Boat makers don’t care about the lifespan of their boats past 15years, just as car makers don’t either. The people who buy new cars and boats have different criteria for what “quality” means. As a dirtbag who never buys new cars or boats, my criteria for quality means how well things hold up AFTER 15 years. And as far as I’m concerned, coring a hull, above or below, is incorrect engineering. Or course if I were a new boat buyer I wouldn’t care at all. A cored hull will be quieter, stiffer, and as long as I sell it after 10 years or less, rot is a non issue.
But, I’m not a big fan of glass in any application so I’m a bit biased.
Sea Word is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2019, 06:05 PM   #24
Member
 
City: Sna Diego, California
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 12
Our Westbay is a 2001. So it's 18 yrs. old and has approximately 14,000 nautical miles on her and the coring is divinicell closed foam with 1/4 inch vacuum bagged vinelester resin on both sides. We had the boat/hull surveyed a year ago for insurance purposes out of the water. All original thru hulls are through solid teak pillow blocks glassed into the hull. The survey was done on the hard and he must have tapped the hull a thousand times and checked every thru hull. Perfectly clean survey. I have the survey if you would like a copy. We just got our ass kicked travelling north from Cabo San Lucas to San Diego for about 80 hours and hauled out for a bottom job. Not a stress crack anywhere. Yes, you are biased....
Ross Macdonald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2019, 07:00 PM   #25
Guru
 
Boat's Avatar
 
City: SchoolHouse Branch
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 514
Maybe we need a replacement hull company. After 40 or 50 years it is not unreasonable to replace a hull. The mechanicals can last longer. Drop refurbished and updated systems into a replacement tub and keep chugging along. Sorta like the 1950's cars in Cuba.

Years ago a buddy of mine did something like this. Hired a welder and built a new boat on the side of the creek. Installed systems from an older boat.

Technically, cored boats are based on solid technology. Solid technology can always be exploited. Humans are weak and the devil is in the details.
Boat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2019, 08:37 PM   #26
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sea Word View Post
Iím surprised to see pros for a cored hull. In my opinion wrapping wood with plastic and then putting it outdoors is a death sentence for the wood.
Who said anything about wrapping wood with plastic? You're still living in the dark ages of coring but builders who core haven't used wood in decades.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2019, 09:26 PM   #27
DDW
Guru
 
City: San Francisco
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 1,048
A properly cored hull will way outlast the mechanicals. Like any material, it isn't good if it is used wrong. The hit against coring might be that it is easier to use wrong, than solid glass.
DDW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2019, 11:17 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Ka_sea_ta's Avatar
 
City: Puget Sound
Country: USA
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Who said anything about wrapping wood with plastic? You're still living in the dark ages of coring but builders who core haven't used wood in decades.
cold molding uses a wood core as does the stitch and glue method. check out Devlin's Sockeye 45...
Ka_sea_ta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2019, 12:46 AM   #29
Senior Member
 
City: Pnw
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SARAH TOO
Vessel Model: 40’ beer can
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Who said anything about wrapping wood with plastic? You're still living in the dark ages of coring but builders who core haven't used wood in decades.
Well, boats in my budget are decades old, so thatís relevant to me. When it comes to water, itís not a matter of if it gets in, itís when.
Sea Word is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2019, 01:34 PM   #30
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ka_sea_ta View Post
cold molding uses a wood core as does the stitch and glue method. check out Devlin's Sockeye 45...
True. Cold molding is basically a wood boat with glass over, not a cored boat as such. In the US mainly used by custom SF builders as a combination for easy build and for light weight and speed.

As to people building a cored boat with glass, coring, glass then I don't know of any builders still using wood coring. May be some small custom builders doing so. The point is that those doing coring have been away from wood for many years and doing an excellent job with other products. It's not like the early days of coring.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2019, 01:36 PM   #31
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sea Word View Post
Well, boats in my budget are decades old, so thatís relevant to me. When it comes to water, itís not a matter of if it gets in, itís when.
Yes, it is relevant to you to see whether water has ingressed and the condition and the type coring.
__________________

BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×