Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-15-2021, 04:20 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 3
Cell coverage, coast washington?

Hi all,



Hoping there is some experience with this. We are planning trip down coast of Washington to Columbia River and wondering what cell coverage is like off the coast.



Thanks for any info/experience on this topic
JD17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2021, 06:37 PM   #2
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Vessel Name: Red Stripe
Vessel Model: Monaco Cayman 35' diesel pusher
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,354
JD17, when you turn the bow and come across the Columbia Bar (it's a piece of cake if you time it right!) head upstream to just beyond the junction with the Snake River. Get in touch with me as you get about half way up the river and the first round is on me.

BTW, I have an Excel file that has all the mileages on the Columbia and Snake
rivers. Also there's a sheet that has all the phone numbers and call signs of the dams and bridges on the rivers. It's yours for the asking.

Mike
__________________
Mike and Tina
2008 Monaco Camelot 350hp Cummins
1981 Boston Whaler 13'
GFC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2021, 06:38 PM   #3
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Vessel Name: Red Stripe
Vessel Model: Monaco Cayman 35' diesel pusher
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,354
Oh, and yes, there is cell coverage on the coast if you aren't too far off shore.
__________________
Mike and Tina
2008 Monaco Camelot 350hp Cummins
1981 Boston Whaler 13'
GFC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2021, 07:03 PM   #4
Guru
 
Portage_Bay's Avatar
 
City: Coupeville Wa.
Vessel Name: Pelorus
Vessel Model: Californian 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,428
If you're on AT&T you may have problems when near Neah Bay and rounding Cape Flattery.
__________________
Some things are worth doing simply because they are worth doing.
Portage_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2021, 07:45 PM   #5
Member
 
City: Portland
Vessel Name: Scout
Vessel Model: Grand Banks EU 47
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 8
I’ve done the tip a ton of times…. There’s coverage 10-12 KM out.. 80% of the time if you have Verizon… AT&T, maybe 40% of the time.
mliemon2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2021, 07:49 PM   #6
Guru
 
tiltrider1's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Vessel Name: AZZURRA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 54
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,792
The Washington Coast has good Cell coverage. I don't remember ever not having cell service. Its possible that there are holes now and then but I have never noticed. Cell service is also very good on the Oregon Coast. Now the California Coast is very different. There are lots of Cell holes along the California Coast.

Now Crab season can drive you as far as 27 miles off the coast. This far out cell service gets more difficult. I like to carry an InReach with me. This is a very inexpensive Satellite communication device that allows others, with your permission, to track you as well as send text and emails.
tiltrider1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2021, 08:09 PM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 3
thanks for your response(s).



Regarding crab season.....

I imagine commercial vs. recreational crab seasons are different and distances out are different. I'd appreciate a crash course on that!



JD
JD17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2021, 12:39 AM   #8
Guru
 
Portage_Bay's Avatar
 
City: Coupeville Wa.
Vessel Name: Pelorus
Vessel Model: Californian 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by JD17 View Post
thanks for your response(s).



Regarding crab season.....

I imagine commercial vs. recreational crab seasons are different and distances out are different. I'd appreciate a crash course on that!



JD
The major concern is commercial crabbing. As far as I know there is no regulatory limit with regard to distance off shore. What I have observed is the crabbers seldom set their pots deeper than 100 fathoms which is usually 25 to 27 miles off shore. Unfortunately there is no set season. Regulators open and close crabbing based on a number of variables.

Pure speculation on my part but it seems for much of the west coast of the US there is a steep drop off at about 100 fathoms. The crabbers want a relativity flat bottom.

I know these are not specific answers to your question. You'll have to head out there and observe. If there are lots of pots out there and you'll be running after dark you may be better off out past the 100 fathom line.
__________________
Some things are worth doing simply because they are worth doing.
Portage_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2021, 01:12 AM   #9
Guru
 
tiltrider1's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Vessel Name: AZZURRA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 54
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,792
If you are only traveling by day then its easy to see the pot buoys and avoid them. If traveling at night its a very different story. In order to avoid them you need to get out into deeper water. Its rare to see a crab pot placed in water over 350' but I do occasionally see them as deep as 400'. I have never seen them in water 500' or deeper. I try to stay in 500' of water at night. There are a few places that require being 27 miles off shore to stay this deep. Often you are only 15 miles off shore. Most Insurance riders say no more than 25 miles. If you ask your broker to be allowed to go beyond the 25 mile limit to stay in 500' of water to avoid crab pots, it almost always granted with no extra fee.
tiltrider1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2021, 10:27 AM   #10
Guru
 
Portage_Bay's Avatar
 
City: Coupeville Wa.
Vessel Name: Pelorus
Vessel Model: Californian 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiltrider1 View Post
If you are only traveling by day then its easy to see the pot buoys and avoid them. If traveling at night its a very different story. In order to avoid them you need to get out into deeper water. Its rare to see a crab pot placed in water over 350' but I do occasionally see them as deep as 400'. I have never seen them in water 500' or deeper. I try to stay in 500' of water at night. There are a few places that require being 27 miles off shore to stay this deep. Often you are only 15 miles off shore. Most Insurance riders say no more than 25 miles. If you ask your broker to be allowed to go beyond the 25 mile limit to stay in 500' of water to avoid crab pots, it almost always granted with no extra fee.
Ive run the US west coast more times than I can count. Pot buoys are not always easy to see in daylight. I've been surprised by buoys that pop up in front of the boat as I crest a swell. I've seen lots of them barely at the surface and just below the surface due to current. Often with so much extra line streaming just below the surface that it is important to keep track of the current diretion to round the pot on the safe side.

I've often seen pots set out to the 100 fathom curve. Of course the 100 fathom line wanders in and out but you will often be over 25 nm out to stay outside the line. Not being a crabber I can only speculate why. The bottom slope is relatively gradual out to 100 fathoms. Then it steepens, in some places almost a cliff. I'm thinkning crabbers want to set their pots on relatively flat bottoms. I've never seen pots set on steep slopes.

One easy to follow bit of advice is the commercial pots are usually set in a straight line following a depth curve. See one and look for it's bothers, move a bit shallower or deeper and Bob's yer uncle till you cross the next line.
__________________
Some things are worth doing simply because they are worth doing.
Portage_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2021, 10:54 AM   #11
Moderator Emeritus
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 5,194
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiltrider1 View Post
If you are only traveling by day then its easy to see the pot buoys and avoid them. If traveling at night its a very different story. In order to avoid them you need to get out into deeper water. Its rare to see a crab pot placed in water over 350' but I do occasionally see them as deep as 400'. I have never seen them in water 500' or deeper. I try to stay in 500' of water at night. There are a few places that require being 27 miles off shore to stay this deep. Often you are only 15 miles off shore. Most Insurance riders say no more than 25 miles. If you ask your broker to be allowed to go beyond the 25 mile limit to stay in 500' of water to avoid crab pots, it almost always granted with no extra fee.
This is great information!
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 10:58 AM   #12
Guru
 
tiltrider1's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Vessel Name: AZZURRA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 54
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 2,792
Portage bay is right. If the seas kick up you might not be able to see the buoys even in the day light. He is also right, if you see one look for the other 20 that are close by. While I haven’t seen any pots in 600’ of water, I’m not going to argue this one. I haven’t made the run for 5 years and I have noticed the pots going deeper over the years.
tiltrider1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 06:27 PM   #13
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 7,130
Concerning crab pots. The Neah Bay tribe lays out pots, normally in a straight line. The horrifying thing is they use BLACK floats. PAY attention!
Alaskan Sea-Duction is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 07:46 PM   #14
Guru
 
Portage_Bay's Avatar
 
City: Coupeville Wa.
Vessel Name: Pelorus
Vessel Model: Californian 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,428
In addition to the black tribal pots are what I think of as ghost pots. They seem to have been abandoned out there. Covered in bio growth, dark green and very difficult to see.
__________________
Some things are worth doing simply because they are worth doing.
Portage_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012