Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-17-2021, 01:39 PM   #41
Guru
 
City: NC
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soo-Valley View Post
Dannc
Have you tried luffing the sails, dropping foresail then laying off toward POB using mainsail only. return is almost downwind. Repeat luff into wind along side POB.
I may have missed a step, you get the idea.
No, we have not tried that maneuver but it sounds like it would work. We are doing these POB drills for sailing classes so we have to follow The Book. Which is fine and useful for a variety of reasons but not so much for a couple sailing and having a POB.

The Figure Eight POB maneuver works, and works well, if you have three, or better yet, four people on board. From a class or training perspective, it is an excellent cap stone exercise because it uses much of what one has been taught in class. But it leaves much to be desired as far as we are concerned with a two person crew.

To me, the key thing is not not loose sight of the POB. Everything else is less important. What we have discussed is to just turn the boat into the wind, blow the sheets, check to make sure there is nothing in the water to fowl the engine or rudder, start the engine and get to the POB.

We have done the POB drills under sail many, many, many times. It works but it takes time and crew to do it. We just don't see how you do it with one person on the boat. The risk of loosing sight of the POB is too great.

The other problem with doing this under sail, is at some point, you get close to the POB, the person at the helm has to perfectly judge the speed and let go the main sheet. The jib got released earlier in the approach. If you don't get it right the boat shoots past the POB, or worse, stops short. Now the person at the helm has to figure out how to get back to the POB. If this is in cold water, one is burning precious time.

This would be much easier and faster under power and even better if the POB had a PLB.

Later,
Dan
dannc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 02:08 PM   #42
Guru
 
City: Newport, R.I.
Vessel Name: Hippocampus
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 2,814
We used jacklines routinely to the point of just keeping them rigged most of the time when moving.
Most folks run them down the walk ways. This will kill you. Even if you watch someone go MOB it will take some time to stop the boat. In those seconds the mob is at the water surface and pulled along. They will not be able to protect their airway being crushed against the side of the boat. There are multiple reports of very fit sailboat ocean racers being killed in this manner.
Also to raise a MOB over a lifeline and back on the deck is impossible even for a deck gorilla let alone the average cruiser. We kept a mast winch and halyard open and dedicated for this purpose knowing that and had a dyneema loop on the D of the harness for its attachment.
When spec’ing my lifelines I asked for 38”. Ended up getting 36” as 38” was too expensive. Ideally life lines need to be above your center of mass. Those on recreational powercraft very rarely are and offer little or no protection. You will flip over them if you strike them while standing. They are useful to serve as a hand rail but not to prevent MOB unless quite high. For many people 42-48” would be required.
A jack line must not allow you to reach the lifeline when harnessed and flip overboard but the harness length must allow you to move. On most boats that means you move the jack line inboard towards the centerline. That will allow you to use the 6’ length. When not fully feasible you are restricted to using the 3’ length. Even then if the jack line is next to the toe rail yo can still go MOB. Rigging jack lines that will actually prevent MOB is easier on sail. On power best way is to place mounts high up on the house and pilot house. Then you can move but still be prevented from MOB while using the 3’ length.
Looking at this put on your harness and tether and actually measure distances when you are clipped in and stretching the jack line. Regardless of how tight you make the the jack line it will stretch. That’s good as if it didn’t you’d break your ribs if you fall.
Think on most trawlers without modifications jack lines aren’t feasible. If you choose to not make modifications best you can do is be very cautious and using a short tether clip to a hard point when you get to where you need to be to do the work you need to do. Depending upon railings or lifelines to save you is a wish and a hope. Clipping on them is likely foolhardy as it will increase your risk of dying if you go MOB.
Big advantage of trawlers is there’s little reason to be on deck in weather or bumpy conditions. Our rule on sail or power is if anyone needs to be outside there’s a second person watching them. I even insisted people use the head not go over the rail or cockpit coamings for a nighttime calling. Or wake someone up. A leading finding in dead MOBs is they have their zipper down.
The foredecks of trawlers look more dangerous to me then the foredecks of sailboats. A wide open space with no inboard grab rails. On sail you usually have several forestays coming down and other stuff to grab or steady yourself against. Can see the sense of running a short jack line bisecting the foredeck or a “manline” like they did on the old time sailing ships.
We routinely run a line from the anchor to a strong point as a common reason to need to go forward is to secure the anchor. We do not depend upon our windlass to do that. Especially as we like no tension on that chain as over time that’s bad for a windlass. It’s a practice I see few others do.
Hippocampus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 02:14 PM   #43
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale. Florida, USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 21,451
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post

This has been a very bad year for drownings in NC. It was a bad spring and many people have drowned this summer on local lakes but mostly on the ocean beaches. Many of the ocean drownings have been from rip currents that people do not know how to handle. There was a 78 year old woman who drowned yesterday at the beach. Been a really bad year.

Later,
Dan
Wifey B: Living on a lake in NC for 12 years, I was shocked at the constant drownings on lakes and in the ocean. Hubby had two cousins nearly drown when younger, one in a city pool due to cheap snorkel type mask, and one at coast due to rip tide taking him out.

Being able to swim doesn't drown proof you and our college required a drown proofing class, but it sure doesn't help if you get hit in the head on the way over.

PLB's are getting much more advanced with things like sending messages vis AIS and MOB alarms and auto on when vest is inflated but they all still need a bit more work so that they're truly rescue tools and not body recovery tools.

Only other things I'll add to the great stuff above is if you've ever towed water skiers think of the pickup of the MOB in that way. Far easier to use a rope like a ski harness and get it to them than it is to go directly to them. Then, always have steps aboard but if you have a crane of any type practice using is on people and on dogs of all sizes. Let's not forget dogs overboard.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 02:32 PM   #44
Guru
 
backinblue's Avatar
 
City: Stratford, CT
Vessel Name: Blue Moon
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 355
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 3,621
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post
No, we have not tried that maneuver but it sounds like it would work. We are doing these POB drills for sailing classes so we have to follow The Book. Which is fine and useful for a variety of reasons but not so much for a couple sailing and having a POB.

The Figure Eight POB maneuver works, and works well, if you have three, or better yet, four people on board. From a class or training perspective, it is an excellent cap stone exercise because it uses much of what one has been taught in class. But it leaves much to be desired as far as we are concerned with a two person crew.

To me, the key thing is not not loose sight of the POB. Everything else is less important. What we have discussed is to just turn the boat into the wind, blow the sheets, check to make sure there is nothing in the water to fowl the engine or rudder, start the engine and get to the POB.

We have done the POB drills under sail many, many, many times. It works but it takes time and crew to do it. We just don't see how you do it with one person on the boat. The risk of loosing sight of the POB is too great.

The other problem with doing this under sail, is at some point, you get close to the POB, the person at the helm has to perfectly judge the speed and let go the main sheet. The jib got released earlier in the approach. If you don't get it right the boat shoots past the POB, or worse, stops short. Now the person at the helm has to figure out how to get back to the POB. If this is in cold water, one is burning precious time.

This would be much easier and faster under power and even better if the POB had a PLB.

Later,
Dan
Did your sailboat not have a motor? Just because you are sailing doesn't mean you can't use it in an emergency. I got pretty good sailing on and off a mooring. Good practice on boat control if you have the opportunity and would be helpful in a MOB situation under sail.
__________________
“In my walks, every man I meet is my superior in some way, and in that I learn from him.” ― Ralph Waldo Emerson
backinblue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 02:35 PM   #45
Guru
 
City: Newport, R.I.
Vessel Name: Hippocampus
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 2,814
The above posts about figure 8s, Williamson etc. and the classic Safety at Sea teaching as lead me to believe what I first posted.

Tap the MOB button. Drop a MOM-8 or equivalent. The MOM waypoint will tell you about where to start to look and the MOM-8 will drift at about the same rate as a person. Everyone on the boat should be told to get to the MOM-8 as best they can and stay there if MOB. How you do the search depends upon what boat you’re on, conditions, and number of crew. Only rule is -as fast as you can.
Although there’s a difference between salt and fresh water drowning and body temperature impacts brains resistance to hypoxia and anoxia in my view those 2 minute (commonly seconds) or less deaths are not classic drownings. At autopsy there maybe little water that has descended into the alveoli. Of course it matters little as you’re just as dead. But for point I was trying to stress. Presence of a life jacket or pfd doesn’t prevent these deaths. Neither are float jackets and even occasionally full blown immersion suits sometimes sufficient. A driver for some of these reflexes is immersion of the face and head. Of course total immersion of the entire body is much worst so devices and clothing that decreases the sudden change in gradient is helpful. Wearing that tight collar and tight constraints around your neck and wrists is uncomfortable. For some people their hands go numb or they get a HA or go faint. Have worn Gumby suits and you just about can’t do anything once in them. Even a Mustang is limiting if you tighten everything up. Don’t fall off the boat.
You can not buy safety 100% You can’t train safety 100%. Those things are of some value but an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Don’t fall off the boat.
No alcohol underway. A leading factor in MOB. Safe practices moving around the boat. Do the safety training and get the basic devices but first and constant thought is -don’t fall off the boat.
Hippocampus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 02:55 PM   #46
Guru
 
SteveK's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Islands, BC Canada
Vessel Name: Sea Sanctuary
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4588
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 3,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post
No, we have not tried that maneuver but it sounds like it would work. We are doing these POB drills for sailing classes so we have to follow The Book. Which is fine and useful for a variety of reasons but not so much for a couple sailing and having a POB.

The Figure Eight POB maneuver works, and works well, if you have three, or better yet, four people on board. From a class or training perspective, it is an excellent cap stone exercise because it uses much of what one has been taught in class. But it leaves much to be desired as far as we are concerned with a two person crew.

To me, the key thing is not not loose sight of the POB. Everything else is less important. What we have discussed is to just turn the boat into the wind, blow the sheets, check to make sure there is nothing in the water to fowl the engine or rudder, start the engine and get to the POB.

We have done the POB drills under sail many, many, many times. It works but it takes time and crew to do it. We just don't see how you do it with one person on the boat. The risk of loosing sight of the POB is too great.

The other problem with doing this under sail, is at some point, you get close to the POB, the person at the helm has to perfectly judge the speed and let go the main sheet. The jib got released earlier in the approach. If you don't get it right the boat shoots past the POB, or worse, stops short. Now the person at the helm has to figure out how to get back to the POB. If this is in cold water, one is burning precious time.

This would be much easier and faster under power and even better if the POB had a PLB.

Later,
Dan
I should have said that I have done as described as well as practiced the others. While we had crew on board I think I could pull off a solo doing the head to wind, drop foresail move and still be closer to POB than the others. As someone said, under sail it is already rough water and that POB head can hide real good.

BTW, I recall it was a ball cap that we saved.
__________________
SteveK
You only need one working engine. That is why I have two.
Sea Sanctuary-new to me 1992 Bayliner 4588
SteveK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 03:08 PM   #47
Guru
 
SteveK's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Islands, BC Canada
Vessel Name: Sea Sanctuary
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4588
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 3,508
We used jacklines routinely to the point of just keeping them rigged most of the time when moving.
Most folks run them down the walk ways. This will kill you.

Where do you lay the jacklines?
The length of the tether will determine how far over the side your head will be?
__________________
SteveK
You only need one working engine. That is why I have two.
Sea Sanctuary-new to me 1992 Bayliner 4588
SteveK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 03:50 PM   #48
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Sold
Vessel Model: Was an Albin/PSN 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 26,389
I won't even go beyond theory vs practicality on Willianson turns for boats our size.

For the life of me, I can't understand how someone would do a Williamson over a 90/270. Let alone a stop an back down or just stop and manuever to keep the person close. And there's more options that I long have forgotten.

If you lost sight of the MOB, statistics (at least my experience) show likely low probability of recovery. For MOBs in general, the vessel the MOB came off off is the likely recovery vessel.

If you lose sight of a MOB during a Williamson versus most other manuevers ,even though that is what the Wiiliamson is designed to overcome....it would be an unnecessary chance if you still had sight of the MOB..... and if you lose that person as far as I am concerned........

The main reason for the Williamson is to immediately kick the stern away from the MOB.... IIRC...returning to a reciprocal course too ....of course
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 05:07 PM   #49
Guru
 
rgano's Avatar
 
City: Southport, FL near Panama City
Vessel Name: FROLIC
Vessel Model: Mainship 30 Pilot II since 2015. GB-42 1986-2015. Former Unlimited Tonnage Master
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 4,551
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post

The main reason for the Williamson is to immediately kick the stern away from the MOB.... IIRC...returning to a reciprocal course too ....of course
On a ship, you cannot get the stern moving fast enough unless you see the MOB go over and he is well forward when he does. In reality anytime a man goes overboard from just about anything unless from the bow of a sailboat with the helmsman well aft and watching as he goes over, there will never be a time the ship's/boat's stern will be swung anywhere before the MOB is well astern. And sometimes the word comes to the conn without reference to which side he went over! No, the Williamson is for the sole purpose of returning down the same track (to reattack a sub with depth charges), which if you have lost sight of the person is a darned sight better way to reacquire visual on him than a circle which could rejoin the original track well after the position of the MOB if the word was late arriving at the bridge. If you can maintain visual, nothing beats a fast circle approach, twisting with engines if necessary.

That said, I once watched a couple of fools dive off of the destroyer ahead of us into San Diego Bay to avoid the deployment for which our ships were departing. The ship from which they jumped backed full, tossed the whaleboat in the water and had them corralled before they got a hundred yards while we stood by astern ready to do whatever. There are lots of ways to crack the MOB nut.
__________________
Rich Gano
FROLIC (2005 MainShip 30 Pilot II)
Panama City area
rgano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 05:13 PM   #50
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Sold
Vessel Model: Was an Albin/PSN 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 26,389
I understand you turn towards the side of the ship the MOB went over....just in case.

The USCG may teach it a little different. Buy yes, I get that it is all about where and when it happened aboard...heck that goes for any MOB....any vessel.

How many MOBs aren't discovered till the next watch or muster?

As far as other better mauevers...boat versus ship is a huge difference that determines which.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2021, 05:33 PM   #51
Guru
 
SteveK's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Islands, BC Canada
Vessel Name: Sea Sanctuary
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4588
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 3,508
As far as other better maneuvers...boat versus ship is a huge difference that determines which.

And under sail or under power. type of boat matters and no one way works best for all.
Time is of the essence. Do the quickest way with your boat.

Where is Pete Messinger, his wife knows how to retrieve Pete, maybe she can share that info.
__________________
SteveK
You only need one working engine. That is why I have two.
Sea Sanctuary-new to me 1992 Bayliner 4588
SteveK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2021, 01:13 PM   #52
Guru
 
City: NC
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by backinblue View Post
Did your sailboat not have a motor? Just because you are sailing doesn't mean you can't use it in an emergency. I got pretty good sailing on and off a mooring. Good practice on boat control if you have the opportunity and would be helpful in a MOB situation under sail.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post
... We are doing these POB drills for sailing classes so we have to follow The Book...
...

This would be much easier and faster under power and even better if the POB had a PLB.

...
Yes, the sail boats have an engine but the courses require using certain techniques, which is not using the engine.

Later,
Dan
dannc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2021, 01:24 PM   #53
Guru
 
SteveK's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Islands, BC Canada
Vessel Name: Sea Sanctuary
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4588
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 3,508
A boat under sail still has to drop sails before the motor becomes effective, is not necessarily faster in returning to MOB, so may as well use the sail power.
__________________
SteveK
You only need one working engine. That is why I have two.
Sea Sanctuary-new to me 1992 Bayliner 4588
SteveK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2021, 01:38 PM   #54
Guru
 
City: NC
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hippocampus View Post
...
When spec’ing my lifelines I asked for 38”. Ended up getting 36” as 38” was too expensive. Ideally life lines need to be above your center of mass. Those on recreational powercraft very rarely are and offer little or no protection. You will flip over them if you strike them while standing. They are useful to serve as a hand rail but not to prevent MOB unless quite high. For many people 42-48” would be required...
Yes, soooooo many boats have life lines that are really trip lines.

The life line needs to be above the waist but most are not.

Sailboats, because of the perceived need to maximize sail area and to get the sail as close to the deck for performance reasons, have inadequate life lines. The problem is that most sail boats are not race boats, their sails are not close to the deck, so the life lines end up as trip lines.

The only value I can in the life lines is that if one falls down, they might stop you from going over. The problem with that is, if you look at life lines, there is often a sizeable gap between the deck and the first line or rail, so one could/would could go over board in spite of the life lines.

This happened a few years ago on one of the go super fast sail boats that was in a race. They were in the North Pacific in strong winds and 20-30 foot seas. A woman came into the cockpit to toss food waste overboard, a boarding wave hit the boat and she got flushed out of the end of the cockpit. The cockpit was an open design with lifelines across the stern but the lifelines did not keep her from going overboard. Even with an experienced, professional, race crew, and with the POB wearing a PFD and PLB, by the time they got the boat turned around and worked their way up wind, the POB was dead.

Also a few years ago, off east Africa, and experienced couple were sailing their home built catamaran. The man went off watch and went below to sleep while his wife/girl friend took the watch. Hours later he woke up and found out she was no longer on the boat. He reversed course and called out a Mayday but they never did find her. The images I saw of the boat made me wonder if she fell off the stern of the bridge deck.

Later,
Dan
dannc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2021, 01:47 PM   #55
Guru
 
City: NC
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soo-Valley View Post
A boat under sail still has to drop sails before the motor becomes effective, is not necessarily faster in returning to MOB, so may as well use the sail power.
Removing power from the sail is fast. You just have to be let the main sheet and jib sheet go. It aint' pretty but ya gotta do what you gotta do. And in fact, with the POB overboard procedures, that is exactly what you do. Let go the sheets. But, the sheet are let go at a given part of the maneuver.

The problem is with a couple as crew, and one goes over board, it is impossible for the remaining person to maintain 100% eye contact on the POB AND maneuver the boat. If one has a 2-3 people on board after one falls over board, performing the sailing POB maneuvers is possible. One crews only job is to maintain eye contact on the POB at all times.

Later,
Dan
dannc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2021, 01:59 PM   #56
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Sold
Vessel Model: Was an Albin/PSN 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 26,389
Who in their right mind doesn't couch or scoot on their buttons when working decks on a smaller vessel in rough seas? Even calm seas when working or not just wandering and holding on so you don't lose your balance.

Sure ships one may try and walk somewhat normal...but our type boats?
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2021, 02:08 PM   #57
Guru
 
SteveK's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Islands, BC Canada
Vessel Name: Sea Sanctuary
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4588
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 3,508
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannc View Post
Removing power from the sail is fast. You just have to be let the main sheet and jib sheet go. It aint' pretty but ya gotta do what you gotta do. And in fact, with the POB overboard procedures, that is exactly what you do. Let go the sheets. But, the sheet are let go at a given part of the maneuver.

The problem is with a couple as crew, and one goes over board, it is impossible for the remaining person to maintain 100% eye contact on the POB AND maneuver the boat. If one has a 2-3 people on board after one falls over board, performing the sailing POB maneuvers is possible. One crews only job is to maintain eye contact on the POB at all times.

Later,
Dan
Dan, First let me say I have sailed plenty and in overnight conditions, offshore with and without crew. We tried the written methods. I settled on head into wind to stall forward movement, tighten both sheets so foresail is centered, let go foresail halyard, then use mainsail to get to MOB by turning on a dime and pointing reverse course. I disagree with letting go of the sheets and letting sails flap in the wind, but you do what works for you.
__________________
SteveK
You only need one working engine. That is why I have two.
Sea Sanctuary-new to me 1992 Bayliner 4588
SteveK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2021, 10:22 AM   #58
Guru
 
City: Newport, R.I.
Vessel Name: Hippocampus
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 2,814
Steve there’s a lot of literature about how to run jacklines. A good basic discussion is on the attainable adventure site. We had a hard Bimini and hard dodger. Sometimes rigged weather clothes on top of that. Jack line in cockpit was at bottom of lockers. Six hard points low down to clip to wherever you were. You could clip while in the companionway, move around the cockpit but you couldn’t reach the edge of the decks so no MOB risk. Going forward jacklines were on top of the house. You could use the 6’ tether and the walkways but again couldn’t fall overboard standing or crawling. You wouldn’t reach. Forward of the mast a jackline went to the bow dividing the foredeck in half side to side. We would attach the 3’ and free the 6’ at that point. Again no MOB risk. At any area you where likely to need to work independent of the jack line there was a hard point to clip to. Often used both tethers to remain fixed in place. That made working with both hands easier. Ain’t rocket science. When tethered there should be no risk of MOB. Don’t use wire or dyneema for jacklines. If there’s no stretch you will get hurt real bad if you fall.
Hippocampus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2021, 01:09 PM   #59
Senior Member
 
City: Edmonds
Vessel Name: Miss Maui
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4788
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 234
One thing no one has mentioned yet... Verify that your swim ladder can be deployed while you are in the water!

A friend was loading provisions in his boat prior to a weekend out, slipped and fell in at the marina. It was 8:00 at night and no one was around. Pacific Northwest, very cold water. That's when he discovered that his swim step ladder was mounted to the hull at the stern and he could not reach it from the water. In desperation he untied his dock line, put several looped knots in it and managed to get himself out of the water.

Last month I saw a boat that had just added staples to their swim step. One staple was directly in front of the swim step ladder. From the water there would be no way to deploy the ladder.

Last note: most power boaters use self-inflating life vests without crotch straps. Whenever someone on my boat uses one I show them how to clamp their arms down over the straps and I advise them to wait a couple of seconds for the vest to inflate and float them to the surface. A guy in Greater Seattle got knocked overboard when sailing, was flailing underwater when the vest inflated and went right up over his outstretched arms. He ended up dying...

Stay safe out there.
Robster_in_edmonds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2021, 01:39 PM   #60
Senior Member
 
Mr. Blu's Avatar
 
City: WAALRE
Vessel Name: Mr. Blu
Vessel Model: Beneteau Swift Trawler 52
Join Date: Jun 2017
Posts: 133
An important important issue is that it is necessary that the MOB is taken aboard in a horizontal position and kept that way when aboard. The reason for this is that otherwise the MOB can die because of the fluids that leave his head as there is space in the other parts of the body. Somebody who stays a while in the water looses water due to water pressure. That's why you have to urinate a lot when you are in the water.
So there occurs underpressure in the body when the MOB is taken aboard in a vertical position and bloodpressure drops very fast. By using a horizontal position this can be avoided.
__________________
Paul
Cruising the Netherlands
Mr. Blu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012