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Old 02-04-2024, 09:26 AM   #21
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I’d think it could potentially be even thicker than that. Just visualizing the stem as it sits proud of the hull sides, and adding the thickness of the hull and the blending of the glass on the interior makes me think it could be 3 inches or so. If it were me, I’d drill a 1/4 or 3/8 pilot hole first, then open it up to 3/4 for the bolt. Either use an eye bolt and acorn nut to finish, or a button head or carriage bolt and eye nut.
Is there any way to include a rubber snubber to lessen the shock of coming up hard on the bitter end?
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Old 02-04-2024, 09:42 AM   #22
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Yes. Good idea.
Thanks!
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Old 02-04-2024, 12:17 PM   #23
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Your boat your call, but what about attaching w/ an eye nut to one (or more) of your windlass or cleat bolts? To keep your anchor & chain from falling into the sea you’ll need to hold MAYBE 1000 lbs, which is not a big load on a small line or SS fitting.

The bolts I mention are already there, and presumably looked at from time to time. A big ss nut from nowhere ‘may’ look silly on the stem of your boat.
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Old 02-04-2024, 01:19 PM   #24
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Yes.
Thought of that and see those bolts.
But don't like the sharp angle the line would then have to take to exit up around and out the deck fitting.
Prefer nice fair lead as straight as possible.
Also prefer it to be easily visible at eye level rather than up under deck out of sight.
But thank you for the suggestion.
Not concerned about minor aesthetics here.
Will make it look nice.
Thank you
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Old 02-04-2024, 02:48 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by koliver View Post
I once had a wave lift the anchor out of its bow fitting and the chain jump off the Gypsey and then run away. With 300 feet of chain, it took quite a while for much of the chain to leave and as I had slowed the boat, I had time to figure out how to stop the running away, then wind it back in.
You can’t just leave us hanging. How did you stop the runaway chain?
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Old 02-06-2024, 05:48 AM   #26
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Your boat your call, but what about attaching w/ an eye nut to one (or more) of your windlass or cleat bolts? To keep your anchor & chain from falling into the sea you’ll need to hold MAYBE 1000 lbs, which is not a big load on a small line or SS fitting.

The bolts I mention are already there, and presumably looked at from time to time. A big ss nut from nowhere ‘may’ look silly on the stem of your boat.
The end of a long bolt in sheer is not its intended direction of pull.
Think how easy it is to snap off the end of a protruding bolt with vice grips.
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Old 02-06-2024, 09:43 AM   #27
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You can’t just leave us hanging. How did you stop the runaway chain?
Well...it wasn't actually moving fast. Once the boat's fwd motion was stopped, the falling anchor and chain were pulling chain out of its locker at a rate that was slow enough that I could grab and hang on without any drama.
I have a line that runs to the head of the anchor that I had neglected to use on that occasion. I am more diligent about using that since that event.
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Old 02-06-2024, 10:37 AM   #28
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We have a friend that had a grounding incident in their 42 that required work on the stem at the waterline. It was almost 10" of solid glass at that point. Get a long bit!
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What kind of boat is that?
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Old 02-07-2024, 11:55 PM   #29
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Does anyone know the thinkness of the GB stem (fore/aft) well above the waterline?
Am considering drilling and thru-bolting a well caulked eye-bolt into the chain locker to accept the bitter-end of anchor rode.
Outside of bolt would exit stem, well above waterline, and be backed with fender washer or backing plate and locknut - all 3/4" stainless.
Had a similar setup on a sailboat once to accept backing plate for inner forestay.
Figured the stem is one of the strongest parts of the boat and a good place to secure a bitter end if it ever came to being necessary to accept a substantial load.
All the woodwork and bulkhead structure inside just seem too flimsy to me.
Anyone ever drilled a hole competely fore/aft thru their GB stem at chainlocker level?
If so, how thick is it?
Will find out myself soon enough but looking to see if anyone has ever done this.
Please advise.
Thanks
Why would you want to do that? I can think of better solutions to every reason you would that I can imagine so, before you do that, please explain a little more completely what it is you are trying to accomplish. Thanks.
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Old 02-08-2024, 12:03 AM   #30
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I want the very bitter end secured in case the windlass breaks, snubbers part, the deckhand screws up or max scope needs to be released and no one pays attention to how much is actually left.
Current set-up is just a tie-off to a large object that cannot physically fit out the deck hawser but that seems bush-league and would just induce upward strain on and in wrong direction on the deck in a manner it was not designed to accommodate.
Am a heavy-duty overkill guy who tries to plan ahead and think of all the possible things that could go wrong so I can address them and put them out of my mind.
Loosing entire anchor rode overboard is something I never want to have to worry about no matter who is running the foredeck.
Currently the GB (at least mine) provides no padeye or proper fitting for this down below unlike other boats i have seen.
And that surprised me for an otherwise well thought out and well made vessel.
I have no problem drilling holes in my boat if the end result is to improve the situation.
Also learned long ago to never assume the prior owner knew what they were doing.
Need to look at everything with fresh eyes and anticipate and plan for problems so they don't happen.
Thanks for asking
But, you want to maintain the ability to cut it away in worst case scenario, not to be tied to it come hell or high water. Your bits/cleats/sampson post/whatever, should be made to take the strain, not an eye-bolt you can't get to. In a case worse than that, you want to fire up the iron wind and prepare to fight.
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Old 02-09-2024, 02:51 PM   #31
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Get about 25 or more feet of nylon line and attach it to the bitter end of the chain. On the other end make a Turk's Head that is about three times the diameter of the hawse pipe that goes up from the chain locker up to the windlass. No drilling, no metal to corrode, no worries about strain on the structure. Leave some excess line on the bitter end of the rope so you can pull and dislodge it easily if it ever plugs into the hawse pipe.
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Old 02-10-2024, 06:32 AM   #32
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In thousands of nights at anchor, I have had to "Cut and run" once. It is different than a "runaway" chain. The scenario was 35 ton displacement, pilot house ketch, 55' on deck. Anchored on a 70# CQR (Stb)and a 70# HT Danforth (Port) spread about 15*. Bottom was cobble stone rocks (roller bearings for anchors)--tested in reverse--but not as high RPM as I would have liked. Year 1984, so no GPS/plotter, fitted with Radar and depth sounder for rough position finding. Water depth where anchors were set was about 40' Bow 6' above the water, with 1/2" snubbers on each rode. Two stern lines; doubled 1/2" nylon to chains around rocks or a tree (with firehose over the chain). We were anchored in a protected anchorage on an Island off the coast of Yugoslavia; an area subject to the "Bora" a katabatibc wind similar to the "Santa Ana" winds in S. Calif. with which I was very familiar. Wife and two early teen age children aboard, all very experienced sailor. I had given each a sharp, robust knife to cut the lines. My situational awareness suggested that the conditions were very good for a Bora and gusts over 55 knots of wind. I had made an escape plan: Pre-planed compass bearings to get out of the harbor and put to sea if our anchorage/anchoring was threatened.

Anchor rode on CQR was 200 feet HT 3/8" chain with 400 feet of 7/8 inch 3 strand nylon rode for CQR; 50 feet of HT 3/8" and 400 feet of 7/8" nylon on Danforth. Both of these terminated with multiple passes of 5/16 nylon through an eye bolt placed through a 12" long piece of pine wood. Primary windlass was two speed Simpson/Lorance 24 volt, with Chain Gypsy and drum for starboard, drum only on port side--operated by foot switches on deck. Then going back over the secondary manual windlass which had both chain wheels, and drum on both sides. Two six feet long solid SS rod 3/4" levers powered this windlass. There was a Sampson post of 4 x 4 Oak, SS metal top, glassed all of the way down to the bottom of anchor locker. With fall into 5' deep anchor locker (divided into 2 compartments, with 3/4" plywood, encapsulated in glass. The deck hole was about 2" in diameter with caps, after rode secured. The multiple pass 5/16 bitter end securing lines reached to about a foot beyond the manual windlass.

Instructions to one person on each of two stern line, and one person on the bow, were to cut the mooring lines away upon the second gust of wind, veering of the bow more than 10 degrees or my command. The ninety Hp Ford Lehman started and in neutral. I was at the helm inside the pilot house, where I could view compass, radar screen, and wind speed. The gust was about 50 knots. I put the engine in gear, brought the RPM to high cruising speed and gave the "order to Cut". The stern lines cut like a rubber band. My wife on the bow, could not bring her self to cut the anchor lines (We had duplicates of the two bow anchors, and 25' of H T chain and shorter rode. The storm anchor was 150# 3 part fisherman, and, 50 feet of 1/2" HT chain, and 200 feet of 1" 3 strand nylon-not deployed. So she tried to pull in some of the Stb line. I finally convinced her to cut both lines, but the anchors had moved out of their verified (triangulated by radar) positions. She finally cut the bowers, and we ran to sea. After a few hours, the wind died down, and we returned to the harbor, rigged our second anchor set, and powered toward a very nice cay, with lots of riprap on the seaward side. We had not seen any boats tie up there. As we pulling along the inner finished side of the cay, the depth sounder showed decreasing depth. We re-anchored. The next morning we took the inflatable to the cay, and the depth sounder showed less than 5 feet. There had been no bottom dredging to allow the cay to be fully functional as a dock for larger. I put on SCUBA gear, and we used a "look box" To try and locate our anchor rodes. The Danforth was easy to find, because there was about 10' of white rode attached to the chain. The CQR rode was elusive. because there was only about 2 feet of the white nylon 3 strand rode. I made a grid and began systematically viewing the bottom from about 3 feet off--thus eventually found the second rode and anchor. Find out what works ahead of time. I would not put the eye bolt through the stem.

We would have been in very serious trouble (on the rocks) if we were not able to cut the bow anchors free. I re-spliced the rodes and all was good! This was a very sobering experience. Upon examination of the 1/2" 3 strand stern lines were heat fused on the inner surface of the 3 strands. Those lines went into the trash. Always plan ahead for various potential scenarios.
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Old 02-10-2024, 06:53 AM   #33
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Very interesting story. Thanks
Good thing you are a scuba guy and could retrieve that ground tackle.
Yes, our bitter end is indeed line that can be cut.
Eyebolt is simply to secure bitter end where will be visible and accessible in a chain locker that unfortunately currently lacks any fixed and stout attachment point.
That is all.
Am only talking about drilling a single hole;
and adding a single well-caulked fitting.
Very simple.
Thank you
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Old 02-10-2024, 07:35 AM   #34
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I'd say if you're concerned about the woodwork inside, reinforcing it somehow might be a good idea.
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Old 02-12-2024, 04:42 AM   #35
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Very interesting story. Thanks
Good thing you are a scuba guy and could retrieve that ground tackle.
Yes, our bitter end is indeed line that can be cut.
Eyebolt is simply to secure bitter end where will be visible and accessible in a chain locker that unfortunately currently lacks any fixed and stout attachment point.
That is all.
Am only talking about drilling a single hole;
and adding a single well-caulked fitting.
Very simple.
Thank you
Whatever process you end up using, an interesting YouTube episode on Dan Lee Boatbuilding, where he secures an eyebolt to the stem of a runabout using the “Gougeon Brothers technique” (West Systems) of over size drilling and filling with epoxy, seemed very strong and water tight.
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Old 02-12-2024, 04:48 AM   #36
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I'd say if you're concerned about the woodwork inside, reinforcing it somehow might be a good idea.
Indeed, some layers of extra glass and resin should be fine, also an excuse for a new coat of paint in the locker.
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