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Old 12-28-2019, 09:59 PM   #1
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Refinishing teak parquet?

Spent today with a heat gun as a first day at renewing the finish on the teak parquet cabin sole. Kinda a pain to try and scrape in 2 different directions. I was wondering if anyone had done this job and if so, what did you use to strip it. Just sand? Chemical stripper? Heat gun?
Whatever the original finish was, it sure resists being scraped even after being heated to the bubbling point.
After stripping a test patch, sanding didn't go well either as the surface isn't very level. Lots of minor cupping and gouges is making sanding a huge job.
Whatever, it looks like it will still be a huge job, just wondered if anyone had found something that worked well for them?
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Old 12-28-2019, 10:14 PM   #2
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I was thinking about doing our cabin soles at some time in the future too. There are the inevitable small dings in the galley area which would be difficult to sand out. My plan was to just clean it really well, then scuff the surface, then add two or three coats of satin varnish. It won't be mirror smooth but neither is the original parquet.
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Old 12-28-2019, 10:15 PM   #3
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Random orbit sander with fairly course grit disks followed by a more fine disk. Like 80 or 100 followed with 200 or 220.

Then brush on polyurethane. Mine is about 8 years old and still looks new.

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Old 12-28-2019, 10:20 PM   #4
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I'm looking at doing my saloon sole as well so I'll be following this thread closely. Pete, how did you handle the corners?
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Old 12-28-2019, 10:26 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsholz View Post
I was thinking about doing our cabin soles at some time in the future too. There are the inevitable small dings in the galley area which would be difficult to sand out. My plan was to just clean it really well, then scuff the surface, then add two or three coats of satin varnish. It won't be mirror smooth but neither is the original parquet.
Our finish is completely burned through in several places. No choice but to completely sand and refinish. Recoating would be a sweet sweet choice otherwise. Bare wood will be hard to obtain.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Meisinger View Post
Random orbit sander with fairly course grit disks followed by a more fine disk. Like 80 or 100 followed with 200 or 220.

Then brush on polyurethane. Mine is about 8 years old and still looks new.

pete
I was going to use Cetol Natural Teak 'cause I have it on board already and it looks like it will be close to the finish on the surrounding cabinets. I was wondering which poly you used?


And I just stopped and bought a random orbital sander at Home Desperate this evening with a bunch of 60 grit pads. I'll use my finish sander after that with 80 and 120. This was my next attempt as 4 hours with a heat gun only stripped about a quarter of the salon and I'm getting old enough that the knees aint what they used to be.
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Old 12-28-2019, 10:53 PM   #6
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Cabin floors get light scuffing and occasional catastrophic dings.
At least mine do. I once left the pipes that support the table on the settee, only to have a wash knock them off. The crescent shaped dings on the floor weren't the first and not the last.
Despite that, a light sanding with a 1/4 sheet sander, 120 grit or so and a couple of coats of Helmsman gloss polyurethane has lasted well and brought me many compliments.
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Old 12-28-2019, 10:58 PM   #7
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Was wondering if polyurethane or varnish should be used for the finish. I've used poly in the past on floors in my house and it worked well. Any advantage to varnish? Also, gloss or satin coat?
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Old 12-28-2019, 11:08 PM   #8
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My father sanded and cleaned the previously oiled teak parquet in my galley and heads probably 10 years ago and gave them a few coats of gloss poly. They've held up great. Galley has been lightly sanded and re-coated to touch up a few dings and scrapes. Heads haven't been touched and they're all holding up quite well.
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Old 12-28-2019, 11:16 PM   #9
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You may find that the DA sander will be very slow removing the finish. We refinished our teak deck on our sundeck last winter. The DA sander took forever. So I pulled out my belt sander and it did a reasonable job, you just have to keep moving and keep it flat on the surface or it will gouge quickly. I took the majority of the finish off with the belt sander and then followed up with the DA to get the last bit off.
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Old 12-28-2019, 11:23 PM   #10
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You may find that the DA sander will be very slow removing the finish. We refinished our teak deck on our sundeck last winter. The DA sander took forever. So I pulled out my belt sander and it did a reasonable job, you just have to keep moving and keep it flat on the surface or it will gouge quickly. I took the majority of the finish off with the belt sander and then followed up with the DA to get the last bit off.

The issue with parquet is that the grain runs in 2 different directions so a belt sander will tear it up when sanding across the grain. And yeah, a DA is sllloooowwww...and the paper tends to clog which is why I was using a heat gun to begin with.


Still looking for first hand on this. LOL, someone out there with a magic bullet?
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Old 12-28-2019, 11:27 PM   #11
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True, the teak deck is one direction grain only. I forgot you have parquet.
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Old 12-28-2019, 11:28 PM   #12
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Does anyone know a source for the teak parquet tiles? I know I'm going to have to replace a few.. Preferably in the central east coast of Florida.
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Old 12-28-2019, 11:35 PM   #13
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You know, I might still give the belt sander a try in an inconspicuous place and see how it does. If you donít overdo it and then follow up with the DA it may come out ok. The DA is going to take forever...
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Old 12-29-2019, 04:46 AM   #14
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Does anyone know a source for the teak parquet tiles? I know I'm going to have to replace a few.. Preferably in the central east coast of Florida.
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I've had a few pieces come up when the glue failed. From what I can tell, these are just small strips of teak that were glued down in a pattern, then sanded and finished in place. Old school in Taiwan at the time yeah?

So Home depot has laminated teak tiles you could buy and adapt to fit. Or just get someone to mill the pieces that you need and pop them up and replace them strip by strip with construction adhesive or waterproof glue.
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Old 12-29-2019, 08:26 AM   #15
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We refinished our salon floors (picture attached) by following the advice of Rob on Datenight who has 50 years in the floor finishing business. Here are some excerpts from a thread:

ďThe sanding depends on the condition of the sole now and what you want it too look like when you finish.

If worn and scratched or uneven you may have to sand a lot more. I would start with #60 on a high speed orbital like a 6" Fein with dust collection. Work up to #80 and #100. Go no finer than #120. You don't want to burnish the wood. This seems to fly in the face of popular opinion but is the recommended method and it works! Use 4-5 coats of your favorite finish. Sand with #150-220 between coats. The goal here is to fill the grain. Build coats should be gloss and may take more to get the look you want. Use satin for the last coat if you do not like the gloss look. No need for a marine varnish inside.

My standard finish is Lenmar. It is available in satin or gloss and holds up well. MoistureCure urethane is a commercial duty finish but hard to find. Be sure to use a respirator with that.

Also very durable is Street Shoe by Basic Coatings. It is a two part waterborn finish. There is a learning curve with it and you must use their sealer first to prevent edge bonding-the finish is so hard it will glue the boards together and the wood can split rather than seperate at the joints with seasonal movement.

Other good finishes are Zip Guard and Lasts and Lasts. I have not had good luck with Minwax although I always use their stainsď.


http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...oors-5688.html
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Old 12-29-2019, 10:19 AM   #16
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With our Defever, we hired a flooring contractor. He used a traditional floor sanders and then applied a swedish finish... The floor looked great and held up well and the cost was a few boat units...
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Old 12-29-2019, 10:30 AM   #17
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For sanding, screens will be much less clog prone than sandpaper if you have to do more than a light sand. So use a sander that will take a floor screen or drywall screen (ideally with vacuum to keep the dust down). The reduced clogging should make sanding faster too.
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Old 12-29-2019, 10:57 AM   #18
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Larry M - that's a beautiful finish. Thanks for the information.
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Old 12-29-2019, 11:32 AM   #19
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Larry M - that's a beautiful finish. Thanks for the information.
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Thanks but the credit goes to Rob. His advice was spot on. It took a day to prep the floors and maybe an hour for each coat. I don't remember if it was Rob or someone else who said, "it's a floor, not a piece of furniture". It made the project go a lot faster.

Here are some pictures of the pilot house floor/stairs we did shortly after with the polyurethane we used in the salon and pilot house.
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Old 12-29-2019, 12:45 PM   #20
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Great info, Larry, and beautiful work!

Thanks.
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