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-   -   Why are you selling your boat? (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s3/why-you-selling-your-boat-61752.html)

bowball 01-10-2022 04:11 PM

Why are you selling your boat?
 
There are lots of posits in various threads about people planning to sell their boats in the next year or two; it sort of makes me sad.

Every sale has its own reasons that are specific but are there some generalities?

Getting older so cruising no longer enjoyable or safe? (Starting at what age?)

Competing interests?

Financial? Declining use?

Upsizing ? Downsizing?

Maintenance?

It seems most of the posts fall in to the first category of having done it for 5 to 10 plus years and moving on?

psneeld 01-10-2022 04:20 PM

Mostly competing interests for me...currently have a slow boat. Either need to travel faster by boat (not sure Ican afford the fuel) or use my motorhome more.

Maintaining the larger, older liveaboard when it's not being used all year round doesn't make as much sense anymore.

The sad part is that every day it keeps getting closer to the way I wanted it years ago...but now priorities have changed.

Gonna still have some kind of boat(s).... just not a liveaboard which I now have done 3 times for over 16 years.

tiltrider1 01-10-2022 05:58 PM

Everyone ages out at different times. While I know one gentleman who is 98 and still boating the average age for aging out is 84.

I will probably be in the competing interest class. I've been doing this since the 60's. It used to take me 2 hours of boat time to get to a world of plentiful oysters, crab, salmon, clams and shrimp. Now it takes me 6 hours and there is a limit and I need a different license for each. I can actually catch more seafood with my American Express card in town than I can on a 2 week boating trip. It just might be time for me to move to a 5 star resort in Central America and leaving the boating to the next generation.

bowball 01-10-2022 06:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tiltrider1 (Post 1067202)
Everyone ages out at different times. While I know one gentleman who is 98 and still boating the average age for aging out is 84.

I will probably be in the competing interest class. I've been doing this since the 60's. It used to take me 2 hours of boat time to get to a world of plentiful oysters, crab, salmon, clams and shrimp. Now it takes me 6 hours and there is a limit and I need a different license for each. I can actually catch more seafood with my American Express card in town than I can on a 2 week boating trip. It just might be time for me to move to a 5 star resort in Central America and leaving the boating to the next generation.

Where were you getting seafood then - 2 hours away - and now?

GFC 01-10-2022 06:40 PM

We had to sell ours just before my 75th birthday. Being the cheerful owner of stage 4 metatastic prostate cancer my balance is no longer capable of me being safely on deck.

70 years of fun boating came to an end.

Soo-Valley 01-10-2022 06:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tiltrider1 (Post 1067202)
Everyone ages out at different times. While I know one gentleman who is 98 and still boating the average age for aging out is 84.

I will probably be in the competing interest class. I've been doing this since the 60's. It used to take me 2 hours of boat time to get to a world of plentiful oysters, crab, salmon, clams and shrimp. Now it takes me 6 hours and there is a limit and I need a different license for each. I can actually catch more seafood with my American Express card in town than I can on a 2 week boating trip. It just might be time for me to move to a 5 star resort in Central America and leaving the boating to the next generation.

You reminded me of the 70's & 80's when seafood was that plentiful all it took was knowing how to land it. I had a routine, drop the crab pot with last weeks salmon head go fishing for a few hours to limit out for the day, go ashore and get clams and/or oysters, pick up the crab pot usually with the limit for the day and decide what to cook for dinner with a drink in hand. Ah, those were the days. I would come home after a weekend and offer fish to friends and family.
Now I am like you, it is cheaper to go to the store.
To fish for it now requires dumb luck and all day while something is left out thawing for dinner.

ETA: to stay on topic, not selling the boat.

tiltrider1 01-10-2022 09:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bowball (Post 1067206)
Where were you getting seafood then - 2 hours away - and now?

In he 70ís we could crab and fish all over just about all of the time everywhere. A quick run to Bainbridge Island would get us clams. Hood Canal would get us shrimp and oysters. You can still do some of it now but the restrictions usually mean you wonít be able to do it on a nice day.

O C Diver 01-10-2022 10:05 PM

My wife is retiring in 2.5 years. She's not a boater, so we'll be land cruising. Don't want to sell, but don't want to do the maintenance if I'm not cruising. I should have about 40,000 miles on my boat by that point and seen much of what I wanted to.

Realistically, I'm probably down sizing to a weekend cruising boat that can live in a boatel while I'm land cruising during the summer.

Ted

kthoennes 01-10-2022 10:38 PM

Boy this is a potentially very depressing thread.

Comodave 01-10-2022 10:39 PM

I usually sell the boat when I get everything done to it that I want to do.

long-cours.62 01-11-2022 04:52 AM

Because
 
2 Attachment(s)
We bought this 72' trawler because my old mother want come on board with us...and finally after 3 hour on board she said : "when I will come back to my flat ? ":facepalm::banghead:






We sold our "long-cours.62" who was perfect for the use we do, able to go everywhere, small draft (air and water :)), very low consumption, able to stand up alone, if finally we can sale our actual I want built a near similar to the Long-cours ...but my wife pretends : "we are too old to built a boat again":mad: and unfortunately not rich to order one :nonono:


The actual is a perfect trawler but too big for two, the former was a perfect "passe-partout":dance:

psneeld 01-11-2022 06:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kthoennes (Post 1067322)
Boy this is a potentially very depressing thread.

Can be, but really...its like life in general. If a serious boater who fulfilled most of your dreams on the water....you know its time, it's inevitable, and you move along with happiness, pride and no regrets. Like Ted and I posted...chances are a boat will be with us again...even if its the 12 foot aluminum skiff I can put on my Ranger that I tow behind the motorhome.

I have seen much of the western hemispheres oceans, now I want to explore some inland lakes and rivers and rekindle my Alaskan salmon fishing pleasures.

Life is still good.

DonW28 01-11-2022 07:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 1067361)
Can be, but really...its like life in general. If a serious boater who fulfilled most of your dreams on the water....you know its time, it's inevitable, and you move along with happiness, pride and no regrets. Like Ted and I posted...chances are a boat will be with us again...even if its the 12 foot aluminum skiff I can put on my Ranger that I tow behind the motorhome.

I have seen much of the western hemispheres oceans, now I want to explore some inland lakes and rivers and rekindle my Alaskan salmon fishing pleasures.

Life is still good.


I concur. We are moving forward slowly selling our Mainship which BTW is the 2d boat we have owned since our "this is our last boat" declaration. I was diving yesterday (44 years of diving) and came up and told my wife I'm cold. Realized that age and time sometimes conspire to make a hobby not quite as fun as it used to be but I wouldn't do it differently. Boating is in that category. We have had some great times on this "last boat" even if it turns out this really is the last one. Life is good and we enjoy it.


Don

RT Firefly 01-11-2022 08:03 AM

Greetings,
Mr. b. We're going to be downsizing because our boating interests have evolved over the last 18+ years or so.

Similar to a young family having an SUV or van for the family and after the kids leave the nest, trading it in for a sedan.

jleonard 01-11-2022 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psneeld (Post 1067361)
Can be, but really...its like life in general. If a serious boater who fulfilled most of your dreams on the water....you know its time, it's inevitable, and you move along with happiness, pride and no regrets. Like Ted and I posted...chances are a boat will be with us again...even if its the 12 foot aluminum skiff I can put on my Ranger that I tow behind the motorhome.

I have seen much of the western hemispheres oceans, now I want to explore some inland lakes and rivers and rekindle my Alaskan salmon fishing pleasures.

Life is still good.

This. Plus I was starting to "lose" the boat meaning the projects were starting to mount up and I wanted to sell while the boat was still prime.
Now we have a travel trailer and were doing the land travel thing.

folivier 01-11-2022 09:42 AM

It's a smart man that realizes it is time to move on. Too often you see a boat, RV, plane, whatever that is slowly dying from neglect because someone tried to hang on too long. Saw a Class B a few days ago like that. Guy inherited it from his dad and thought it was great. However a bad roof leak had rendered it in bad shape. Don't want that kind of project.
We were never able to realize our dream of having a trawler but did have large motorhomes and saw much of our country and have no regrets. Recently bought a cabin in Colorado so looking for a B to travel back and forth and short trips.

Souvenir 01-11-2022 10:02 AM

We fell into the category of competing interests. Owned a 34' cruiser (weekender) for years, and dearly loved it. At some point we began traveling extensively out of the country, work became more intense, bought an ocean-front place in FL, and we got more involved in our kids' activities. Finally realized we were not using the boat nearly as often as we should, so made the hard decision to sell.
We've missed it ever since then, and fast-forward ten years, circumstances have changed significantly. We are retired and find ourselves in search of a trawler. Hope to do some significant cruising while we have our health, time & resources.

Moonfish 01-11-2022 10:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kthoennes (Post 1067322)
Boy this is a potentially very depressing thread.

I was thinking the same thing by the time I got to your post (#9).

Then it occurred to me that there is a lot of potentially positive results from reading this thread, too. Number one being: ENJOY IT WHILE YOU CAN!

And another thing is, although itís sad on the surface to read that circumstances, age and/or health has dictated that someone sell their boat, there are all the great memories people have made on the water. My family is still making them, and threads like this remind me TO ENJOY IT WHILE I CAN!

(Sorry, didnít mean to yell that againÖ 😊)

High Wire 01-11-2022 11:24 AM

We’re too much away from our family, mainly our grandkids while they are still 3 and 5. Wife is not happy. :(

bowball 01-11-2022 11:43 AM

I wonder if the solution for some is to charter a week or two after they sell. Charter as you enter the boating lifestyle before buying then chartering as you exit it to give you more flexibility.


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