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-   -   Watch Super Yacht Go crash into the dock (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s3/watch-super-yacht-go-crash-into-dock-56452.html)

Lollygag1 03-01-2021 11:06 AM

Watch Super Yacht Go crash into the dock
 
:popcorn:

https://www.mby.com/news/superyacht-...an-dock-113024

FWT 03-05-2021 05:43 PM

https://www.thedailyherald.sx/island...ed-malfunction

Simi 60 03-05-2021 06:14 PM

And this is why I don't like boats heavy on electronics

From another angle, hit it twice.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kAmZ_HbVvzM

markpierce 03-05-2021 06:32 PM

Well, this boat, my first, cost me eight million bucks. They let me operate the boat without instruction. I'm innocent. Sue the builder, not me, please. :blush:

Blissboat 03-05-2021 06:57 PM

Simi 60 wrote, "And this is why I don't like boats heavy on electronics."

Amen, brother.

bucketlist1 03-05-2021 07:15 PM

Is this when the " Owner '' tells the captain ..... '' I will take her in !

MurrayM 03-05-2021 07:22 PM

These things always bring up questions given such little information...such as...how could it reverse out twice if it was stuck in forward?

mvweebles 03-05-2021 07:32 PM

No thruster. Wonder what happened. Certainly no place for him to dock.

Peter

Simi 60 03-05-2021 07:41 PM

Reading the second article it seems he was in position for the bridge opening
Boat takes off by itself
Hit the bridge or hit the jetty.

MurrayM 03-05-2021 07:41 PM

To be fair, he said,
Quote:

“I found I had extremely limited control, almost limited to only the bow thruster, but with now only 50 metres between us and the bridge I had to make a decision fast.
and it was the reporter who said it was stuck in gear.

High Wire 03-05-2021 08:04 PM

There is no excuse for the yacht designer to exclude manual overrides on all automatic controls. And the commissioning crew should have insisted that they be fitted.

MurrayM 03-05-2021 08:25 PM

That massive stainless steel waterline bow feature sure came in handy :thumb:

Jon H 03-06-2021 12:08 AM

https://youtu.be/Fnd7RpMmF0s

This video explains what happened based on an

interview with the captain of "Go".

lwarden 03-06-2021 01:05 AM

Not at all a surprise. Many of us have fly by wire controls and there have been a couple reports of incidents of malfunctions (as listed on this forum) and crashes as a result. I have them on my boat and there is always a bit of a background worry, but I find them very nice to use.

backinblue 03-06-2021 06:51 AM

To be fair, he did have 1 fender out, so he was well prepared to dock.

I had something happen on my tiny (by comparison) boat last year that was unsettling, but did learn something from it. All feedback is welcome, as well as criticism, I can take it.

I was bringing my boat to a different harbor for winter haul and storage. It's a fairly narrow channel into the harbor with docks and mooring on both sides. I was alone on the boat and when I got out of the rough weather and into the harbor channel where it was nice and calm, I prepared to dock. I was barely making headway and had to put out fenders and lines. I put the gear in neutral and hit the autopilot so I could make quick runs to the bow etc. No worries as there were no other boats operating nearby and I was watchful while working. As the boat slowed to almost zero and the autopilot tried to correct against the current, it eventually reached the rudder limit. When I went back to the helm, the rudder was locked in position against the stop. Even turning the autopilot completely off (power down) did not release it. After a couple minutes with the pilot off, and trying to move the wheel but not forcing it, it released.

In hindsight, I should have slowed the boat to a near stop and not engaged the autopilot, at least that's what I would do next time.

catalinajack 03-06-2021 08:24 AM

I was once witness to just this sort of uncontrolled collision with a lock sidewall. We were entering a lock just behind the unfortunate boat. As this boat was slowly approaching the sidewall at a proper angle, a warning from the mate was called out on the radio that they had lost control of the throttles. The boat struck the wall, bounced away, moved forward into the stern of an already secured boat, bounced back, and then again into the lock wall with its pulpit wedging underneath a railing. It happened so fast and at the most inopportune moment that the captain could not shut the engines down fast enough to prevent the collision.

We had been among several Loopers who happened to be traveling in the same vicinity. Anyway, we later learned that the cause was low voltage on the battery supplying the juice to the electronic engine controls. The voltage had gone low enough such that the computer defaulted to the last commanded choice. Turned out that the battery that supplied current to the controls was the bow thruster battery. It was deduced that previous, recent, heavy use of the thruster had lowered its voltage to the critical point. Obviously, this was a bit of a design flaw. Those controls should have been supplied by the house bank or the starting batteries.
Quote:

Originally Posted by lwarden (Post 983938)
Not at all a surprise. Many of us have fly by wire controls and there have been a couple reports of incidents of malfunctions (as listed on this forum) and crashes as a result. I have them on my boat and there is always a bit of a background worry, but I find them very nice to use.


rslifkin 03-06-2021 08:33 AM

Things like low voltage causing controls to misbehave is why I refuse to put electronic controls on my boat. There's no reason they can't work well, but it seems that too many of the currently available marine implementations just aren't designed well. It should have built in voltage regulation, for example, so unless the voltage is so low that nothing else works, the controls would be fine.

When things go wrong and it's not immediately apparent what has happened, there will usually be a little bit of panic. And then some delay while you try to figure out what's happening. So even with an override or shutdown, it's easy to not hit it soon enough.

High Wire 03-06-2021 08:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by backinblue (Post 983969)
As the boat slowed to almost zero and the autopilot tried to correct against the current, it eventually reached the rudder limit. When I went back to the helm, the rudder was locked in position against the stop. Even turning the autopilot completely off (power down) did not release it. After a couple minutes with the pilot off, and trying to move the wheel but not forcing it, it released.

Sounds like the AP forced the rudder to the mechanical limits of the rudder or ram. The AP has preset electrical limits to prevent this IF properly set. Generally these limits are set at about one half of the way from center to the mechanical limit. Get out your AP Installation Guide and double check the Rudder Limit setting. Something is still wrong.

backinblue 03-06-2021 08:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by High Wire (Post 984015)
Sounds like the AP forced the rudder to the mechanical limits of the rudder or ram. The AP has preset electrical limits to prevent this IF properly set. Generally these limits are set at about one half of the way from center to the mechanical limit. Get out your AP Installation Guide and double check the Rudder Limit setting. Something is still wrong.

Thanks. That's pretty much what I expected and will check it out. Although, with normal use, the AP should be nowhere close to the limits I would think. Now that I know better, I won't make that mistake again.

Portage_Bay 03-06-2021 08:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by backinblue (Post 983969)
To be fair, he did have 1 fender out, so he was well prepared to dock.

He was departing and had been off the dock for quite some time. Clearance through the bridge was so tight fenders could not be used. He choose to hit the dock because that was the best option out of only bad options.

Captain of ‘GO’ opens up on mega yacht’s unexplained malfunction.

Quote:

Originally Posted by backinblue (Post 983969)
I had something happen on my tiny (by comparison) boat last year that was unsettling, but did learn something from it. All feedback is welcome, as well as criticism, I can take it.

I was bringing my boat to a different harbor for winter haul and storage. It's a fairly narrow channel into the harbor with docks and mooring on both sides. I was alone on the boat and when I got out of the rough weather and into the harbor channel where it was nice and calm, I prepared to dock. I was barely making headway and had to put out fenders and lines. I put the gear in neutral and hit the autopilot so I could make quick runs to the bow etc. No worries as there were no other boats operating nearby and I was watchful while working. As the boat slowed to almost zero and the autopilot tried to correct against the current, it eventually reached the rudder limit. When I went back to the helm, the rudder was locked in position against the stop. Even turning the autopilot completely off (power down) did not release it. After a couple minutes with the pilot off, and trying to move the wheel but not forcing it, it released.

In hindsight, I should have slowed the boat to a near stop and not engaged the autopilot, at least that's what I would do next time.

Some autopilots have limits. Set the limit a few degrees off hard over, that last little bit of rudder doesn't do much anyway.

Regarding control failures. I have experienced failures with push pull cables, mechanical linkage, pneumatic, hydraulic and electronic controls. Any and all can and will fail. There's an old saying that will mostly keep you out of trouble "Stop her before you dock her". But, one failure happened after the stop before the dock. That was a failure of the final connection at the transmission. It's important to know the failure mode of your control system. Does it fail where last command was, i.e. ahead or astern? Does it fail safe i.e. neutral idle? It's important to be able to stop the engines in the event of a control failure. The failure that drove me nuts trouble shooting it was on a pair of John Deere 4045 common rail electronically controlled engines. Low voltage was the problem, displayed error was excessive water in the fuel?!?!


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