'We sold everything to do this and lost it in 20 minutes'

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Trawler Forum mid-winter...
 
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More $$$$

I wonder if they are now wishing they would have made the Gofundme $ goal higher. they are going to meet the $10000.00 pretty fast.
 
I wonder if this is taxable income.
 
ok they're at 8 grand .that settles it I putting my old Marinette in and crashing it into the a jetty.
 
Being young and cute is worth a lot these days.

If you can take advantage of it, why not?

Nobody who can't afford it is sending money to these crowdfunding beggars. In a way, they're providing a valuable service, makes people feel good to think they're helping.

But only if you can tell a good story, with appealing photos.
 
It is hard to believe that people are stupid enough to gave these two money on a Go Fund Me site.
Next year I want to do the Trent Severn. Going to have to set up a go fund me page to get everyone else to pay my way.
 
I have been tempted to start a go-fund me page, with the stated purpose to raise money, so I can buy more of the stuff I like to buy. :D

+1! This is depressing. Reward the ignorant and/or ill prepared. Makes me wonder why I worked for a living all those years.
 
Believe me, lottery winnings like these are rare.

Actually setting out to earn a living on social media is just another flavour of making a go of it in show business. You are trying to make a living entertaining people.

Damn hard and under 1% actually get anything but memories out of years of trying.
 
I am trying to be sensitive and sympathetic, especially since they are so young and inexperienced---but---I wish that all my losses in life could be as small as 20 thousand dollars in total. If a fortune teller told me that the worst thing that would ever happen to me for the rest of my life was that I would lose 20K I would be a very happy man!



Well said
 
I was 30, she was 26, we left on a 6 month sea kayaking trip along BC's coast in late October, snowed the first night, took only bear spray and knowledge of seasonal bear habitat to avoid, early 80's, no GPS, paper charts and a deck compass, hand held limited range marine radio, no contact with outside world for up to a month at a time, everybody told us we were insane, saw in some family members eyes on departure day that they never expected to see us again.

We did, however, spend several years reading all we could and earning our 'chops'...

No money from us.
Even though you had got through most of the worst of it, we still thought you were crazy, re: the Kayak trip. Imagine having to tie the Kayaks together because the seas were so high (20') you couldn't see each other.
 
Maybe that was the plan the whole time.

Two people without a lot of money or skills buy an old boat cheap, start sailing it, and "conveniently" manage to sink it right near shore.

Next thing they're in the press pleading poverty and despair (plus ignorance).

Pretty quick they set up a GoFundMe account and plead for help.

Next thing you know they have lots of suckers, er, concerned citizens giving them money. Before you know it, they end up with more money than they started with.

It's just the modern world's version of insurance fraud, but breaking fewer laws and not having to worry about big corporations coming after you when the fraud is discovered.
 
Maybe that was the plan the whole time.

Two people without a lot of money or skills buy an old boat cheap, start sailing it, and "conveniently" manage to sink it right near shore.

Next thing they're in the press pleading poverty and despair (plus ignorance).

Pretty quick they set up a GoFundMe account and plead for help.

Next thing you know they have lots of suckers, er, concerned citizens giving them money. Before you know it, they end up with more money than they started with.

It just the modern world's version of insurance fraud, but breaking fewer laws and not having to worry about big corporations coming after you.

Everyone needs to make a living, somehow.
Reminds me of the dating sites, "Send me money and I will come to you."
You'd be better off spending the money on beer.
 
Like basing your life plans on "reality TV" shows.
Yep. This is pretty much exactly what it sounds like. I feel kind of sorry for them, but only "kind of."

And I have to agree with whoever it was that said, more or less, if losing $20k is the worst thing that ever happens to them, they should be able to have a great life!
 
Even though you had got through most of the worst of it, we still thought you were crazy, re: the Kayak trip.

The two spots that worried us the most were Cape Caution and Seymour Narrows...thanks for letting us crash at your place after the narrows.

(We've known each other since 1964!)
 
Perspective is a funny thing. If they succeed like Robin Lee Graham on 'Dove' (circa 1968), they've triumphed as hero's. If they tramp around like vagabonds just getting by, it's 'romantic'. We wax nostalgic about such crazy, awesome, simple lives in our later years ("Just me, my girlfriend and a dog, travelling around the country living in a van. Keeping it simple. We bathed in the stream in the morning! It Was Awesome").

But if they fail, they are criticized as irresponsible 'millenials'.

My kneejerk reactions was more on the 'idiots, what were thinking/".

Also keels don't just rip off. They do so after being seriously neglected and typically after several previous groundings, which would be very possible on a 50 year old boat.
 
Maybe that was the plan the whole time.

Two people without a lot of money or skills buy an old boat cheap, start sailing it, and "conveniently" manage to sink it right near shore.

Next thing they're in the press pleading poverty and despair (plus ignorance).

Pretty quick they set up a GoFundMe account and plead for help.

Next thing you know they have lots of suckers, er, concerned citizens giving them money. Before you know it, they end up with more money than they started with.

It's just the modern world's version of insurance fraud, but breaking fewer laws and not having to worry about big corporations coming after you when the fraud is discovered.

Everyone needs to make a living, somehow.
Reminds me of the dating sites, "Send me money and I will come to you."
You'd be better off spending the money on beer.

That's all well and fine, until my tax dollars and SAR personnel risking their own safety are added to the mix....
 
Wifey B: Colorado.....:ermm: Let's see, leading crop of Colorado, now legal there. :ermm: Methinks perhaps they imbibed way too much. :)
 
Maybe that was the plan the whole time.

Two people without a lot of money or skills buy an old boat cheap, start sailing it, and "conveniently" manage to sink it right near shore.

Next thing they're in the press pleading poverty and despair (plus ignorance).

Pretty quick they set up a GoFundMe account and plead for help.

Next thing you know they have lots of suckers, er, concerned citizens giving them money. Before you know it, they end up with more money than they started with.

It's just the modern world's version of insurance fraud, but breaking fewer laws and not having to worry about big corporations coming after you when the fraud is discovered.

You give them credit for more intelligence than they have.
 
Perspective is a funny thing. If they succeed like Robin Lee Graham on 'Dove' (circa 1968), they've triumphed as hero's. If they tramp around like vagabonds just getting by, it's 'romantic'. We wax nostalgic about such crazy, awesome, simple lives in our later years ("Just me, my girlfriend and a dog, travelling around the country living in a van. Keeping it simple. We bathed in the stream in the morning! It Was Awesome").

But if they fail, they are criticized as irresponsible 'millenials'.

My kneejerk reactions was more on the 'idiots, what were thinking/".

Also keels don't just rip off. They do so after being seriously neglected and typically after several previous groundings, which would be very possible on a 50 year old boat.
Thanks. [emoji3]
 
Keels do just fall off, obviously from neglect, but unprepared newbies, no proper survey, entirely likely never even heard of a keel bolt.
 
The go fund me is over 12k. They can have the boat salvaged and start over.:dance: let’s see if they do the right thing.
 
Maybe the money they get from the inevitable Go-Fund Me account will let them get a better boat, which will allow them to sink even more spectacularly, perhaps getting even more coverage allowing a new funding plea. In a year or two their boat will be better than yours......

Predicted correctly back in post #21. I wonder if this was their intent from the get-go?
 
Greetings,
Mr. WH. "Predicted correctly back in post #21." Indeed you did. WELL DONE! Now, I really think these adventurous young-uns have learned their lesson with boats. I predict...

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After all, what could possibly go wrong?
 
My head didn't even wrap around the idea. [Speculating] that at some point they might have realized that they had issues during their refit. They determined to replace the bolts in the keel would cost 1-2x the purchase price of the boat, so the 'scuttled' (in a notorious channel with recently reported markers well off their station). Now the crowd-funding benefactors can get them a much nicer boat. (??)

Yikes, that would be outrageous. I'm leaning towards youthful inexperience.
 
I apologize up front, as a never respond to drivel like this, but as the father of a millennial, feel the need to respond.

I can't comment on the kids you see as potential new hires. You see who you see, but what you post is not reflective of a whole generation of kids.

I am very proud of my daughter. Despite having some personal difficulties, see graduated last spring from an honors college, and begins a new job as a civilian employee working for the Coast Guard next week. :thumb: I have come to meet many of my daughter's friends at college and they are upstanding kids, who I have no doubt will make this country a better place. Does this mean that all millennials are hard-working, no, but that isn't any different than our generation either.

Regarding making health insurance available to children under 26, I think this is a great idea. My daughter was 23 when she graduated college. If I am paying extra to have her insured on my health insurance plan, why should you even care???

Oh, the horror of kids moving back home. :rolleyes:

Thirty-six years ago, after I graduated college, I didn't have a job and moved back into my parents house. Even after I got a job I lived at home for another two years. Gotta tell ya, my Mom was sad when I moved out! Guess that makes me a freeloader :ermm: (By the way, I have had a pretty successful career, went to grad school in the evenings, and have a great family myself).

My daughter will be following in her old man's footsteps. She will live with us for a couple of years while getting her career established and building her savings. Do you approve? Really, I don't care. :nonono:

I don't think millennials (as a whole) have to figure anything out. Like any generation before them, they are a wide variety of individuals.

Jim

Wifey B: Amen...hallelujah brother. Sock it to em. :D The vast majority of our employees are between the ages of 18 and 30 and they're simply incredible. Wish we had more jobs so we could hire more but only have about 3600 jobs right now. We're so proud of them all. I also see the kids from the orphanage in NC and they're so wonderful. I'll tell you if they ran this country, this world, instead of the generation that has screwed things up so, we'd be far better off. Not only do they have their heads on straight and work hard, but they have their hearts in the right place too.

My hubby's protege is 19 years old and an absolute genius and wonderful girl. Her company she's now CEO of is projecting sales in 2018 of $66 million and her personal income will be over $1 million for the second year in a row. Oh, she's also going to college while doing this.

Then there's our "adopted" daughter. Came into our life at 18, in 2013. Finishing her masters with degrees in psychology and sociology and a strong accounting base as her dream is helping others by running our foundation. We hope she never leaves home. We know she will. She intends to stay here for at least her first two years doing field work for those nights she comes home having lost, having been unable to help or save or get someone to listen. She's choosing a career that is filled with pain but is so driven to help. I know hubby will smile and laugh the day she leaves and then as soon as she's gone he'll bawl his eyes out in my arms.

You talk about today's kids and we take it very personally. They're "our kids", kids we're proud to know, proud to employ, proud to call our own. No, their generation isn't perfect. None is. But they're sure an improvement on the ones they're following. They still dream of a better world and haven't become jaded and bitter. They're not filled with hate, but with love.

If you haven't met kids like I describe, then you need to get to it, search them out, talk to them, get to know them and understand them. They're all around you. Go to a college campus, even a high school. I see kids in high school student councils and their long list of their projects in the course of a year and I'm amazed. How do they have time to do so much for others? They care about others and they do for them.

If you aren't getting them when you hire, then you need to fix your hiring practices, because they're there. We're getting them. Maybe we're getting the best and you're getting the worst, but we sure do feel good about ours.

As to moving back in, we'll always welcome them all with open arms. Not just the "daughter" I mentioned above, but the other two members of the "Brat Pack", made up of the three. One from a good family, one who grew up in horrible conditions. And the older girls we're close to, it's the same. The girl and her daughter we went to pick up after Irma and helped recover. The girl our "daughter" helped turn her life around and moved from NC here.

We have come to believe in some very old fashioned concepts. Before we were so mobile, kids were raised in a community, large families and larger extended families. Well, our true family is just hubby and me. But we first adopted ourselves some parents and a sister because we didn't like our parents and by then they were dead anyway. That led to a brother in law and a niece I love so much. Then somehow in FL we collected a group. People in and out of our home whether we're there or not. I recall while the girl rescued from abuse in NC was in a recovery center. We were generally out of town but every Sunday afternoon when they had a family time for visitors, two or more of our extended family went. She had family now and always will. So, kids, you want to come back, come on anytime. You need us, we're here and we love you.

Don't stereotype a generation or I'll stereotype yours. If I judged yours by my parents or by my hubby's or by his aunts and uncles and cousins even, I wouldn't judge it nicely. However, your generation is like all, it's got good and bad. Humans are that way. If you don't like those you're meeting from any generation then go meet some different ones. Find those who share your values. Exchange thoughts and ideas. Teach them and you'll learn.

But you start condemning this generation and you'll bring out my claws and fangs and Wifey B will go full on angry tiger. They're my kids and I love them and I'm proud of them. :D
 
The pioneers are the ones with the arrows in their back.
 
The pioneers are the ones with the arrows in their back.

Wifey B: We're waiting for the son of Poseidon, Proteus. Then the superkrewe of Orpheus. You mate Zeus and Calliope and you get a musical genius. :dance:
 
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