Mast/Boom Reinstall? Or just Give Up?

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Do you have any past photos from the PO of your vessel with everything installed? Otherwise, I’d suggest getting some professional assistance on this matter. The forces on the mast and boom can be large and mistakes can be costly. Second, before proceeding, take all stainless cables to a cable outfit and get them to make up cables with new thimbles, etc as stainless cabling looks fin up until it fails. It isn’t necessary to go to the expense to get swage fittings. New cables could be made up for size for less than $200.
 
Greetings,
Mr. AR. I think the bit you're referring to in post #30 is the outboard end of the boom. There's appears to be a shackle for a line or clip attachment or maybe not...
 
If you are able to put it back up, make sure you can fairly easily take it down. You won’t be able to do the TSW if it is up and the TSW is awesome. Are there running lights or other equipment mounted on the mast? If so that can be something to consider in remounting it or not. To me, the ability to do the TSW would be a huge factor.
 
If you are able to put it back up, make sure you can fairly easily take it down. You won’t be able to do the TSW if it is up and the TSW is awesome. Are there running lights or other equipment mounted on the mast? If so that can be something to consider in remounting it or not. To me, the ability to do the TSW would be a huge factor.
There are running lights and maybe radio wires inside. Agreed on the TSW, author that'd be a long way away. I could post more pics, but everyone's probably over it. Lol
 
I have a radar arch so that is where my lighting, etc is located. Since we live on the great lakes, I would either change to a different system or modify the mast so it can be lowered easily so you can do the canals. Just something to think about while you are planning your work on the boat.
 
Don’t give up. IMG_0269.jpg

Flat end of mast fits in a tabernacle. This allows the mast to be lowered, So it is a hinged piece. The standing rigging goes through the yardarms at the top of the mast. They attach to the main cabin, There should be turnbuckles to adjust the tension on the the shrouds ( standing rigging on sides). The collar fits on top of the mast and it the attaching point for the shrouds and four stay, Which is the wire to attach toward the front of the boat. Mine attached to a frame (reinforced) on my Bimini.

The aft facing attachment point is for the boom lifting rigging. You should have two sets of block and tackle. One for lifting the boom the other for lifting the object to lift. Mine is primarily used for lifting my outboard motor. But I have lifted swimmers in distress and coolers of beer. Both emergency activities.

I have attached I hope a picture showing my rig. Good luck.
 
Here's a sketch based on the pictures you posted, with annotations color-coded to the markups on the photos below.

The boom appears to have a toggle, which is expected as it has to swing side-to-side as well as up-down. There should be a fitting on the mast to accept this toggle. The boom suspension appears to originate where the yards mount, and there will be a lug or clevis on the end of the boom to accept the bottom block. On the bottom of the boom will be another lug or clevis for the upper load block.

The shrouds are presently terminated at the top of the mast, and there will be chainplates or deck lugs for the lower terminations. The will mount aft of the boom tabernacle, as they counter the forestay (for fore-aft stability) as well as each other (for side-to-side stability). The forestay is not visible, but there will be an attachment point on the front of the mast, in the area of the shroud terminations.

It looks like the anchor light and masthead light are both there. The masthead light will attach to the front of the mast, which is facing down in your pics, high enough to clear obstructions and not cast annoying light into the fly bridge area.

I have no idea what the bottom of the mast looks like, though, as it should either socket to the deck, or pin to that clevis.

The yard arms are only there to hold antennas, possible spreader lights to light the deck like sailboats often have (not present, though), and even flag halyards, but they're not actually spreaders as the shrouds terminate at the mast.
 

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Here's a sketch based on the pictures you posted, with annotations color-coded to the markups on the photos below.

The boom appears to have a toggle, which is expected as it has to swing side-to-side as well as up-down. There should be a fitting on the mast to accept this toggle. The boom suspension appears to originate where the yards mount, and there will be a lug or clevis on the end of the boom to accept the bottom block. On the bottom of the boom will be another lug or clevis for the upper load block.

The shrouds are presently terminated at the top of the mast, and there will be chainplates or deck lugs for the lower terminations. The will mount aft of the boom tabernacle, as they counter the forestay (for fore-aft stability) as well as each other (for side-to-side stability). The forestay is not visible, but there will be an attachment point on the front of the mast, in the area of the shroud terminations.

It looks like the anchor light and masthead light are both there. The masthead light will attach to the front of the mast, which is facing down in your pics, high enough to clear obstructions and not cast annoying light into the fly bridge area.

I have no idea what the bottom of the mast looks like, though, as it should either socket to the deck, or pin to that clevis.

The yard arms are only there to hold antennas, possible spreader lights to light the deck like sailboats often have (not present, though), and even flag halyards, but they're not actually spreaders as the shrouds terminate at the mast.

WOW,just wow. the time you put in to labeling the pics is much appreciated! The detail is amazing! Learning the vocabulary will help get that elusive extra peice, as The end of mast is just plain, similar to pic below. there's not really hardly marks on mast either at bottom. the only other solid peice we've got is the clamp (pic posted earlier). Forum input seems to suggest bottom needs some sort of "pivot thing or tabernacle" at the bottom. And i agree with Comodave, must be easy to manipulate here in Great Lakes.
I love the sound of a radar arch, but that seems like a luxury at this point. The frugalness in me says use what you've got, add the arch to the list for later.
Lots to digest..thanks again!
 
Good luck with the mast. If you do get to a point where you go to a radar arch, look at Atlantic Towers. I put one on a previous boat and it was really nice and relatively inexpensive. No affiliation.
 
Good luck with the mast. If you do get to a point where you go to a radar arch, look at Atlantic Towers. I put one on a previous boat and it was really nice and relatively inexpensive. No affiliation.
Works for me, got it, wiil add to files. thanks.
 
Everyone is giving you very good advice. Here's more:

Bolt bottom of mast to tabernackle with mast laid down towards the back end of the boat. Don't tighten the bolt just stick it through the hole and hand spin the nut/washer on.

Have one person at the base of the mast, one on the back of the boat.

Find the longest wire (rigging) which will be at the front (top) of the mast.

One person stands on the flybridge and pulls on the wire, the other person ensures the mast doesn't try to go side to side, e.g. goes straight up so as not to put too much stress on the tabernackle fitting at the bottom.

That wire will attach to the flybridge cowling at the center of the boat.

The other four wires - you'll figure out where those go really quick, as they will reach to where they go and no where else.

I prefer to leave the boom off, as I don't use the steadying sail, and it's something to bang your head on when moving around the boat. When you find the steadying sail, probably stashed in some locker, thread it on the mast (this will be obvious looking at the mast and the sail, trust me...). The boom goes at the bottom of the sail, the end of the sail attached to the end of the boom. At the end of the boom will be a pulley that you'll have to route a line (rope) through, it probably cleats off back there somewhere.

HTH! You're in Sandusky, I'm at Anchor Pointe in Curtice, call me if needed 734 six four five 4980
 
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Hello. We are new 1st time Trawler owners ,and cant figure out the mast system for our 36' 1985 Ka Shing.
The boat has sat shrinkwrapped for years, with mast system disconnected. We're not even sure we have all the parts.
We've got 2 long posts, one is a boom, and the mast holds wires for radios, etc.
We also have another random bracket (found in a cubby), and a small floor mount.
We did buy some Stainless Steel Nuts & Bolts that fit the floor fixture.
There's no marks on the Mast where it would have connected to boom before.

We've searched You Tube for help, to no avail. And, there's no similar boats around.
At this point, Most of the family is in favor of not re-hanging,and just going without, buying a handheld radio, installing a separate anchor light and calling it a day.
But ,we'd like to figure this mess all out and get it re-installed.
I'll post some pics below of the parts we've got.
If anyone can provide direction how to connect these or if we're missing parts, we'd appreciate it. thanks in advance!
I would definitely keep the mast and boom for all kinds of reasons. We had a similar issue with our boat. In spite of being very familiar with sailboat rigging, I had a difficult time trying to figure out how to to rig the mast, boom, topping lift, mainsheet, etc. Parts were missing and even after I figured it out, I saw major deficiencies in the original set up. I called a rigger and a fabricator for assistance. Well worth it. Added split fore stays, redesigned the mainsheet and had another stanchion fabricated for support. The rig is up and stronger than original. Not only is the mast a great antenna platform (radar, TV, Wi-Fi, AIS), it is also a great traditional look for the boat.
 
We have a mast 33 feet above waterline. It's a great excuse to make bridge tenders do their job, as well as giving greater radar and radio range. There is a tabernacle, but a crane is needed to lower/raise the mast due to its heavy construction.
 

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Hello. We are new 1st time Trawler owners ,and cant figure out the mast system for our 36' 1985 Ka Shing.
The boat has sat shrinkwrapped for years, with mast system disconnected. We're not even sure we have all the parts.
We've got 2 long posts, one is a boom, and the mast holds wires for radios, etc.
We also have another random bracket (found in a cubby), and a small floor mount.
We did buy some Stainless Steel Nuts & Bolts that fit the floor fixture.
There's no marks on the Mast where it would have connected to boom before.

We've searched You Tube for help, to no avail. And, there's no similar boats around.
At this point, Most of the family is in favor of not re-hanging,and just going without, buying a handheld radio, installing a separate anchor light and calling it a day.
But ,we'd like to figure this mess all out and get it re-installed.
I'll post some pics below of the parts we've got.
If anyone can provide direction how to connect these or if we're missing parts, we'd appreciate it. thanks in advance!
The covered connector should be four-pole connector for the spar light and the anchor light.


First thing I did in my trawler is to cut the mast in half and get rid of the guy wires holding it in place. Now I have a mast that can be brought down by a single person and do all the maintenance the spar and anchor lights may need plus the radar dome and the VHF antenna. In addition, the removed wires no longer interfere with the Bimini top covering the fly bridge.


Best change I made as the sail was never used at all in 30 years.
 
Assuming the boom will never be used ......a self supporting mast is a good idea.

But I use the mast and boom to lift all kinds of heavy objects aboard so it's original configuration is quite handy...then again I would rather have a nice dingy crane and a folding radar arch....
 
Everyone is giving you very good advice. Here's more:

Bolt bottom of mast to tabernackle with mast laid down towards the back end of the boat. Don't tighten the bolt just stick it through the hole and hand spin the nut/washer on.

Have one person at the base of the mast, one on the back of the boat.

Find the longest wire (rigging) which will be at the front (top) of the mast.

One person stands on the flybridge and pulls on the wire, the other person ensures the mast doesn't try to go side to side, e.g. goes straight up so as not to put too much stress on the tabernackle fitting at the bottom.

That wire will attach to the flybridge cowling at the center of the boat.

The other four wires - you'll figure out where those go really quick, as they will reach to where they go and no where else.

I prefer to leave the boom off, as I don't use the steadying sail, and it's something to bang your head on when moving around the boat. When you find the steadying sail, probably stashed in some locker, thread it on the mast (this will be obvious looking at the mast and the sail, trust me...). The boom goes at the bottom of the sail, the end of the sail attached to the end of the boom. At the end of the boom will be a pulley that you'll have to route a line (rope) through, it probably cleats off back there somewhere.

HTH! You're in Sandusky, I'm at Anchor Pointe in Curtice, call me if needed 734 six four five 4980
Hi neighbor! Great description, easy to follow. We are out your way all the time. We Had a sailboat pro from local marina that was going to help- but hasn't showed up, much like the mechanic to help w/ engine overheating ...
We Haven't been able to find parts local, so the mast/ boom are still laying at dock, and The boat sits dockside.

We're anxious to visit the Islands and start doing some fishing .
Not many of these boats our way here in Western basin- Have only seen 5 or 6 between Vermilion and PC. Thanks for the contact info- and maybe will see you out there, someday!
 
Hi Neighbor!
I'm at the Marina most every weekend, my slips are I-35 and I-36. Right now I have the Trawler in the barn, recoring the cabin top and doing some other repairs.

There's a Marine Trader sitting on the hard and Meinke's West, not sure what the story is on that one. And of course the old KK42 for sale in Erie. And me :) My trawler always draws lots of attention at Middle Bass, or PIB and I am sure you'll have the same experience.

We fish off my other boat, a Bayliner 2750 Cierra a.k.a. the "Beater Boat"

I've been repairing boats as a hobby for 30 years, so if there's anything you need help with don't hesitate to ask. Or stop by to borrow a cup of resin LOL.
 
And of course the old KK42 for sale in Erie.
Is that still for sale? RCR listed it, but it's not on their site any more. I was mildly interested, but for what it was listed for, I would guess it needs a lot. Plus, there's too much bright work and teak decking and such, and I'm not getting any younger or richer. My FIL had one for 26 years (bought new), and let it go for the same reason.


OP: I'm beginning to think that mast and boom didn't come off your boat. That, or there's a lower half to the mast that's missing.
 
Just looked, it's off YW too. I talked to the broker when it was first listed, he said it was an older couple who had trouble docking it and as a result rarely took it out.

I was thinking if one could pick it up for around $60K and put $100K in they would have a boat worth about $100 :)
 
I have a sister ship

I have a sister ship, number 127, rigged with the identical Mast. Mine has had the aft side of the Combing cut away to allow the Mast to be lowered easily. I am away at the moment but will send pictures when I return. I have used a steading Sail, it is nice to have in a Beam sea like Saginaw Bay. I have a 10 foot RIB that we hoist on Weaver Davits. The Rigging is straight forward. Ours has a Ring on the forward side of the Mast and a fitting on the aft Bimini rail that let's me stand up the Mast and use a Pin to keep it standing while I put the 4 Stays in place. You should have 4 Tangs sticking up from your Combing to receive the Turnbuckles. No Forstay is needed.

MARCY
 
I've been repairing boats as a hobby for 30 years, so if there's anything you need help with don't hesitate to ask. Or stop by to borrow a cup of resin LOL.[/QUOTE]

You may be sorry you offered..when we actually show up! Thanks a ton- we are pretty excited to be part of this world.
 
I have a sister ship, number 127, rigged with the identical Mast. Mine has had the aft side of the Combing cut away to allow the Mast to be lowered easily. I am away at the moment but will send pictures when I return. I have used a steading Sail, it is nice to have in a Beam sea like Saginaw Bay. I have a 10 foot RIB that we hoist on Weaver Davits. The Rigging is straight forward. Ours has a Ring on the forward side of the Mast and a fitting on the aft Bimini rail that let's me stand up the Mast and use a Pin to keep it standing while I put the 4 Stays in place. You should have 4 Tangs sticking up from your Combing to receive the Turnbuckles. No Forstay is needed.

MARCY

Would love to see pics when you have a chance! ! Thinking once it’s upright, the rest falls into place as others have given great descriptions.thanks for the help.
 
Sorry this took so long! Find attached pictures of our Kha Shing 36 Mast. The cut-out aft of the Mast is to let us drop the Mast into a simple Cradle made of crossed 2 X 6 with a cross brace on the bottom that holds the Mast about level when down. Don't know if all the photos attached, there are 11.

Mark
ketchdesign@gmail.com
 
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