Interesting boats

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Hey Nick - Twasent me! But, I too agree!! And, recall the quote from some TF member??

"I also like that it's twin engine. I completely get and agree with a comment someone made here (maybe it was @Art ?) to the effect of, 'It only takes one engine to get home, which is why I have two."
 
Hey Nick - Twasent me! But, I too agree!! And, recall the quote from some TF member??

"I also like that it's twin engine. I completely get and agree with a comment someone made here (maybe it was @Art ?) to the effect of, 'It only takes one engine to get home, which is why I have two."

I like that too. The only caveat is that most diesels that don't run is because of a fuel issue. If you have bad fuel, doesn't matter how many engines you have!
 
I like that too. The only caveat is that most diesels that don't run is because of a fuel issue. If you have bad fuel, doesn't matter how many engines you have!
You’re absolutely right about fuel issues being the most common.

Though in 25 years of running diesel boats, I’ve never had a fuel issue.

See my previous post. Both of the boat-stopping problems I had, in a new boat with under 100 hours - engine stopped (main bearing in the circulating water pump violently disintegrated), and loss of steering (hydraulic line popped off because a clamp wasn’t properly tightened, resulting in rapid loss of steering fluid - had nothing to do with fuel.

Both problems would have been easily resolved and non-issues in a twin engine boat.
 
You’re absolutely right about fuel issues being the most common.

Though in 25 years of running diesel boats, I’ve never had a fuel issue.

See my previous post. Both of the boat-stopping problems I had, in a new boat with under 100 hours - engine stopped (main bearing in the circulating water pump violently disintegrated), and loss of steering (hydraulic line popped off because a clamp wasn’t properly tightened, resulting in rapid loss of steering fluid - had nothing to do with fuel.

Both problems would have been easily resolved and non-issues in a twin engine boat.

I've only had one diesel problem and it was in fact a clogged pickup in the fuel tank, so I guess I am in the majority.
 
How one feels about the interior layout, like everything about a boat, is a personal matter.

That is absolutely correct, which is why I said making up my mind, not anyone else's mind. I also noted it was hard to tell, some picture angles etc.
It is the sharing of opinions that makes these forums useful, another perspective and all that.
 
Think the 41 was aimed at at the coastal/near shore market. Can’t have a flybridge and still be “A”. In the same ballpark you can have a 475. Dry stack, flybridge, range, and designed for passage making as it’s primary purpose. Fewer people use their boats (even nordhavn) for that program. Hence the 41 and 51 make great sense. Still the wait time for a 475 is even longer than for a 51 from what my broker told me. The 45-55’ market is still strong. Think as time goes on Nordhavn and KK will face increasing stiff competition from the more efficient narrow, light Al boats in the passage making sector. Their move to mixed use but still relatively heavy GRP is forward looking in order to remain viable as a builder.
 
Well here is an interesting boat.



Met the new owners the other day in Eagle Harbor Cypress Is.



When the skipper mentioned the 1000 hour 37 hp mitsubishi, it confirmed all.



Hope all is well Eric



Good eye there![emoji106]
 
Think as time goes on Nordhavn and KK will face increasing stiff competition from the more efficient narrow, light Al boats in the passage making sector.

Why? Those are completely different vessel types for completely different customers. IMO I don't see any advantage to the LRC type of vessel over a typical trawler design, except for those who are purely emotionally driven in such direction, or perhaps in the near future, are contemplating an electric hybrid driven vessel.

Some thoughts about long, skinny custom aluminum cruisers:
* There are perhaps 1-1/2 dozen Dashew boats out there and about 3 on this TF which are built/design/construction. So perhaps there is 1 being built every 3 years. How many NH and KKs are built each year?
* A 65ft LRC has the interior of perhaps a 50ft trawler like a Nordy or KK.
* They get great fuel mileage... I would think that is not very important to a guy who can afford 3 million on a new boat.
* Resale on a custom aluminum boat is likely much less than a production NH/KK. How much fuel would that difference purchase?
* The difference in mooring/haulout costs will easily eat that margin away.
* Remember the 95% rule. Assuming one embarks on a 4 year circumnavigation, you will spend 7% of your time at sea at 8 knots and 93% of your time moored.
 
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* They get great fuel mileage... I would think that is not very important to a guy who can afford 3 million on a new boat.

Better fuel economy isn't just a cost factor, it's also a convenience factor. It means either you can gain space back somewhere in the boat by carrying less fuel, or you don't have to refuel as often (which can be a convenience factor in some areas). More easily driven boats will also need smaller engines which take up less space, meaning either the engine room can be a little smaller or there will be more room to work.
 
This isn't a 'trawler' but an interesting boat I saw yesterday, on the hard at Bristol Marine, Rhode Island. Looks like a 1950's Maine-built downeast ('lobster') boat. Wood, ofcourse. I couldn't find any identification as to what yard built it.

Can anyone identify the builder?

GRAYLING is a masterpiece. She's a Bunker and Ellis from 1954 (or thereabouts).
 
GRAYLING is a masterpiece. She's a Bunker and Ellis from 1954 (or thereabouts).

Thank you very much!!

The boat truly is a work of art. It's just gorgeous to look at, and I'm sure a dream to be in underway.

Have to hand it to the Maine boatbuilders. They do make the (IMHO, of course) absolutely most beautiful boats anywhere. There's just nothing like the looks of a true Maine downeast boat going through the water, or even at anchor (but then, we all gravitate to what we grew up with).

I love the traditional downeast hull design too. For me it's the perfect semi-displacement balance of great seakeeping abilities in nasty conditions, with a nice turn of speed. I've always yearned for a downeast boat (the closest I ever came was owning a Sabreline 36 Flybridge Sedan, a very nice boat in its own right, built in Maine, but still really a planing hull and downeast-inspired styling).

Since this search was for what is likely my last boat, I looked hard for a downeaster. Didn't work out. Couldn't find a nice one in my price range, and a new build from a Maine yard was beyond my budget (unless we opted for a smaller, more spartanly finished boat). Ah, well, my very wise wife says we can admire the looks of them from anchor in our upcoming Helmsman 38 Sedan.
 

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I think this one qualifies as an interesting boat: the 1901 138 ft stem yacht Cangarda, on the hard at Front Street Shipyard in Belfast Maine (the shipyard alone is well worth a visit to the area).

Front Street Shipyard refit the boat in 2015 (a 4 year project, it would be interesting to see the total bill for that project). It looks to be in immaculate condition, probably better than when it was new. Amazingly, it still has its original steam engine powerplant.

It has two separate deck cabins, for and aft. The forward one seems to be for crew and ship controls, the after one (more plushly outfitted) for owner and guests.

https://megayachtnews.com/2015/05/classic-yacht-cangarda-at-front-street-shipyard/

It's for sale, for a mere $4.6 million (which I imagine might be less than the cost of the refit a few years ago).

https://www.yachtworld.com/yacht/1901-custom-pusey-$-jones-steam-yacht-8030108/
 

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Nick14 Beautiful and expensive boat to buy and maintain.
Not practical by today's standards but, what boat is practical.
 
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Had me going until the said 'pod drive'.

The older I get, the more I realize my boat is just about right for me.
 
Nick14 Beautiful and expensive boat to buy and maintain.
Not practical by today's standards but, what boat is practical.

Is this boat practical?
Said to be the world’s smallest trawler. 20’

But it wouldn’t be practical for a home builder w experience building wood boats and no aluminum welding experience.

Don’t miss the stabilizers aft.
 

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Nick14 Beautiful and expensive boat to buy and maintain.
Not practical by today's standards but, what boat is practical.

:rofl:

You're right, what boat is "practical"?

Though, I think the reason she's been on the hard and has been for sale for the past couple of years is that operating and maintenance costs must be beyond astronomical. Can you imagine the crew alone it would take to operate a 138 ft long, 121 year old, steam yacht? With its original 121 year old steam engines?? It could be pricey even for a Boston or Manhattan multi-centi-millionaire hedge fund manager. Maybe into the rarified air of billionaires, and how many of them want a ship like this?
 
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:rofl:

You're right, what boat is "practical"?

Though, I think the reason she's been on the hard and has been for sale for the past couple of years is that operating and maintenance costs must be beyond astronomical. Can you imagine the crew alone it would take to operate a 138 ft long, 121 year old, steam yacht? With its original 121 year old steam engines?? It could be pricey even for a Boston or Manhattan multi-centi-millionaire hedge fund manager. Maybe into the rarified air of billionaires, and how many of them want a ship like this?


Also don't several states require a boiler certification to operate such an engine?
 
Also don't several states require a boiler certification to operate such an engine?

Your insurance company will require so many 'additions' it may surprise you.
Boiler certification and boiler operator certificate (license), for a start.
 
A tug may loose most of it’s charm if it’s brought up/down to “pleasure-boat standards and finish”.
Who would want it then?
 
A tug may loose most of it’s charm if it’s brought up/down to “pleasure-boat standards and finish”.
Who would want it then?

I would. I think a commercial tug like this, fitted out with an interior to American Tug or Nordic standards, would be a dream boat.
 
It gasoline, no thanks

I know it lists "gasoline" - But, I didn't know Allis Chalmers made gas engines. Thought AC's were all diesel. Also, it looks like the engine powers a high voltage electric drive.

:confused::confused::confused:
 
Well, this one about takes the cake for me as it just popped up on yacht world today. Chime in if you have ever dined here: Forbes Island. While not technically a boat, it does float and can be moved. Thing I remember about it was that I think in the dinning room there were underwater portholes that were off a battle ship. Very cool, and Forbes confirmed to me that there were a number of porno films shot in the bedroom back in the day. Ohhhh..the glory days of San Francisco when it was a great city....I was there many times in a former world many moons ago. Those were good times. The insurance company rep we had sure knew what the guys liked to do in the city, great food and wine at Masa's, and Mitchell Brothers Theater for desert lol. For sale, asking 1.5mm

Designed and built by the well known ship creator of the many prestigious floating homes today in Sausalito, CA - Forbes Kiddoo. Forbes’s experience and consummate skills as an engineer, builder and craftsman were all called into play during the construction of this island retreat. Five years were invested making the 75’ x 42’ long submersible shell buoyant with reinforced concrete. It has a 25,000 gallon water storage tank, multiple fireplaces a 19 foot bar of Honduran mahogany.

The island has 17 handcrafted doors and 55 antique portholes. In addition to its many rooms it boasts a 600 square-foot salon capable of seating 100 people. A wine cellar maintains a constant temperature of 58° and can hold 1200 bottles and three oak barrels. Complete with an arched chain and brick doorway the cellar is eerily reminiscent of Poe’s “Cask of the Amontillado” or Jules Verne’s version of “20,000 Leagues under the Sea”

There is an airlock within the wine cellar with a massive door to withstand changes in pressure and is completely functional as an underwater entry or exit route and decompression chamber.

It has been meticulously maintained by its current owners and Forbes Kiddo himself has offered to share additional information about its history which includes hosting guests such as Tony Bennett and John Wayne. See more about its history on You Tube at the link below.

Enjoy dining next to its underwater portholes while watching the fish swim past, escape via an underwater diving hatch, or retire to the grand bedroom suite fit for a captain of his or her own private world and so much more. In the 90’s Forbes added a 40 foot lighthouse which offers outstanding views.

Check out our gallery of Forbes Island as it looks today.

 

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