How big is too big???

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My 34 footer and two a/c units. My neighbors 53 footer has 5 a/c units.1head.3 heads. I could go on. Size does matter.

And our 60 fter has zero a/c and due to vessel design, aren't needed.

It seems the average 35 fter on this forum probably has more gear to fail and maintain than we do.
 
And our 60 fter has zero a/c and due to vessel design, aren't needed.

It seems the average 35 fter on this forum probably has more gear to fail and maintain than we do.

Need for A/C is a location thing as much as anything. Our 38 footer ventilates well, but ventilation while raining is an issue. And some days are just miserably hot and humid with no wind where being able to turn the A/C on to get the humidity down is a lifesaver.
 
Need for A/C is a location thing as much as anything. r.

Yes, no, maybe
As I've said before, our cruising grounds for the past 7 years are the southern hemisphere version (latitudes) of Florida to Cost Rica.

Yes, extra humidity when raining can be an issue but the heat itself has never bothered us.
 
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Yes, no, maybe
As I've said before, our cruising grounds for the past 7 years are the southern hemisphere version (latitudes) of Florida to Cost Rica.

Yes, extra humidity when raining can be an issue but the heat itself has never bothered us.

Even at equivalent latitudes and temperatures, some areas are more comfortable than others. Depends on typical humidity, how often it rains, typical winds, etc. And also how consistent the weather is (and therefore how well you adapt to the heat).
 
I don't think it has been mentioned yet, but there are also size specific regulations to be aware of that may drive a decision on overall length.

e.g. in Queensland, Australia there is an arbitrary size limit of 15m (just over 49 feet) over which a boat is deemed a 'regulated vessel' and must have a special Maritime Standards assessment and endorsement.

I haven't had to do this, so don't know how arduous the process is, but if governments are involved it probably isn't simple!
 
I don't think it has been mentioned yet, but there are also size specific regulations to be aware of that may drive a decision on overall length.

e.g. in Queensland, Australia there is an arbitrary size limit of 15m (just over 49 feet) over which a boat is deemed a 'regulated vessel' and must have a special Maritime Standards assessment and endorsement.

I haven't had to do this, so don't know how arduous the process is, but if governments are involved it probably isn't simple!

A new one to me
Had to google it up

What is a regulated Australian vessel?

Your vessel may be considered a regulated Australian vessel (RAV).
Under section 15 of the Navigation Act 2012, a RAV is any Australian vessel that:

is registered, required to be registered, or entitled to be registered under the Shipping Registration Act 1981

is not a recreational vessel, and

is proceeding on an overseas voyage, or for use on an overseas voyage. An overseas voyage being any voyage beyond the Australian exclusive economic zone (EEZ),

or
has a valid safety certificate issued under the Navigation Act 2012, other than a tonnage certificate, pollution certificates, an anti-fouling system certificate or a Declaration of Maritime Labour Compliance

has an opt-in declaration in force


https://www.amsa.gov.au/vessels-operators/flag-state-administration/what-regulated-australian-vessel

We are a recreational vessel so it seems, can't be a RAV
 
They responded that over 65’ not allowed to be moored at the outstations.

Not sure who you are talking to and exactly what they were talking about.

There is limited availability for boats over 50’ at Seattle Yacht Club outstations. However we do allow boats over 70’ at most of our outstations.
 
A new one to me
Had to google it up



We are a recreational vessel so it seems, can't be a RAV

See this;

https://www.qld.gov.au/transport/boating/registration/recreational

A recreational vessel is also a regulated vessel when 15m or longer.

"If your boat is 15m or more in length (PDF, 55KB)—applications for new registration, transfer of ownership or change of boat details must be endorsed by Maritime Safety Queensland before the registration can be processed by Transport and Main Roads."

There is a PDF that explains the following;

"Boats 15 metres and over in length present additional risks to marine safety and the marine environment because of their size, their potential to be operated over greater distances and their capacity to carry more passengers on board.

Maritime Safety Queensland requires that all new applications for boat registration, transfer of registration, or change of boat particulars for a boat with a length of 15 metres or more be referred to Maritime Standards before an application is processed by a Transport and Main Roads Customer Service Centre."


"In considering whether a boat is suitable for registration, the officer will consider the following:
• the boat’s design and build
• whether the boat has been modified in a way that
makes it suitable
• would a person require special skills or expertise (engineering or deck skills) to navigate the boat beyond that possessed by a recreational marine driver licence holder
• whether the nature, design, characteristics or equipment of the boat are of a commercial nature (that is, non-recreational)
• whether the boat should be required to carry additional safety equipment
• whether the boat is seaworthy to the required standard."


I have attached the pdf for reference.
 

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The older I get, the worse my eyes get.
The older I get, the slower I get and my knees hurt more.
May I suggest you look a DockMate?


I have had a dock mate for 55 years every time I tell her to let me know when i get 5' from the dock she says " how do I know when it is 5' " :blush:
 
See this;

https://www.qld.gov.au/transport/boating/registration/recreational

A recreational vessel is also a regulated vessel when 15m or longer.
Well, we are over 15m in length and QLD registered
I do remember sending a pic of boat and a form with minimum information asked when putting her in my name as an extra compared to registering our tender, but that was all that was required

Add: just downloaded form.
It was a tick a few boxes and send it in for assesment
Obviously no issue as we got registration in our name without anything extra needing to be done
 
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Well, we are over 15m in length and QLD registered
I do remember sending a pic of boat and a form with minimum information asked when putting her in my name as an extra compared to registering our tender, but that was all that was required

Add: just downloaded form.
It was a tick a few boxes and send it in for assesment
Obviously no issue as we got registration in our name without anything extra needing to be done

Good to know. As I said, I haven't done it before so didn't know how arduous the process might be. Was just pointing out the idea that regulations should also be considered when length is being discussed.
 
Yes, no, maybe
As I've said before, our cruising grounds for the past 7 years are the southern hemisphere version (latitudes) of Florida to Cost Rica.

Yes, extra humidity when raining can be an issue but the heat itself has never bothered us.

Previously noted many trawlers and recreational power in general don’t have as good ventilation as compared to average sail. Absence of adequate number and placement of dorades to use during rain. Absence of forward and aft facing hatches. Absence of adequate numbers of opening port lights.

That said a major factor in need for AC is whether the vessels is in shade and there’s a wind blowing. While in tropics the AC rarely went on. The only times were when the boat was in a slip. If anchored out you have wind across the vessel. In a slip there’s much less wind and it’s commonly from the wrong direction. When anchored the boat faces that wind so even in light air a wind scoop gives you adequate ventilation and allows things to stay open even in the rain. Due to the fact UV ages things it’s common to put up shading a few feet above the decks of a sailboat. It’s remarkable how much that drops the temperature inside the boat. Other than the Bimini over the fly it’s hard to do on power.

Still sail or power if you’re in a hot, high humidity place like Florida in a slip with no wind you are either miserable or have AC running. From personal experience that’s true from 42N to 9N at times as well where the majority of my cruising has occurred. Have even needed AC for comfort as high as Lunenburg. It’s another incentive to stay out of marinas.

Find it unfortunate that as recreational power design has evolved the emphasis on good natural ventilation has declined. Yes it’s easy to open the pilot house doors and aft salon door but usually the staterooms have poor cross ventilation and no dorades. We have excellent shading for all glass and our hull is white. Have learned to deploy the bug screens. Then at anchor unless it’s raining real hard the doors can stay open.
 
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Wind has a lot to do with it...my somewhat limited experience in different parts of Florida for a total of10-12 years suggests that what we always called the trades in the Caribbean and South Florida (East Coast) made a huge difference.

Stand in the sun and out of the wind.... pretty horrible.

Get in the shade with just a medium breeze and the right clothing and life wasn't too bad...downright "vacation like"..... :D

But go inland a few miles away from the water in Sothern East Coast Florida/Carib. Islands or above maybe Canaveral or so and the atmosphere turns into a Louisiana crab boil. :nonono:

For my trawler in Florida, I had 2 "sun shades', triangular for the bow and a perfect fit rectangle for the bridge. They helped a lot but sill needed air a bit of the time when working or cooking below.

When the below type shades appeared on Amazon for around $25 and could be ordered in just about a custom size....I said "worth a try" and they did at that.
 

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Wind has a lot to do with it...my somewhat limited experience in different parts of Florida for a total of10-12 years suggests that what we always called the trades in the Caribbean and South Florida (East Coast) made a huge difference.

Stand in the sun and out of the wind.... pretty horrible.

Get in the shade with just a medium breeze and the right clothing and life wasn't too bad...downright "vacation like"..... :D

Another trick we’ve been taught is color of clothes. If in sun white (best) or very light pastel shades. If in shade black or very dark. In shade you want to radiate your heat. In sun whites reflect the heat before it reaches you. Also buy loose fitting clothes. We got rid of all our cotton clothes. Even under clothes. Replaced with high tech fabrics. Keep you cool/dry and less volume and easier to wash in a splendide.
 
[SNIP]

For my trawler in Florida, I had 2 "sun shades', triangular for the bow and a perfect fit rectangle for the bridge. They helped a lot but sill needed air a bit of the time when working or cooking below.

When the below type shades appeared on Amazon for around $25 and could be ordered in just about a custom size....I said "worth a try" and they did at that.

On my boat I have a custom made shade that rolls up and stores at the front of the flying bridge, but at anchor can be extended out to cover the front deck and forecastle.

Allows for airflow while providing shade and rain protection, so hatches can be left open.

Works very well.
 

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Nice set up. Will think about doing something similar. On the sailboat it took a minute or three to set up. How long does that take? Can you provide more snaps and details please?
 
Nice set up. Will think about doing something similar. On the sailboat it took a minute or three to set up. How long does that take? Can you provide more snaps and details please?

Undo a couple of clips on four straps that hold it in place when stowed. Unroll it and then clip all the 12 straps to the handrail. Takes about 5-10mins to setup. Only downside is lack of access to the bow to check the anchor without undoing some of the straps or crawling underneath the awning.

Here are some more pics.
 

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