Feed back on West marine dinghy

The friendliest place on the web for anyone who enjoys boating.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

motion30

Guru
Joined
Jan 14, 2010
Messages
1,205
I am considering the purchase of a West Marine 11-foot hayplon rib
Feed back good or bad?
 
I’ve had one for 2 years. Leave it outside. No issues.
 
Mine has been hanging on the back of my boat for 3 years and seems OK.


It is a single hull bottom, hypolon.


The finish seemed to oxidize pretty fast for winters in FL, Summers in NJ....but not too bad and I can't say any worse than other RIBs.


If may be slightly lesser quality than some but on sale, it was very nicely priced.
 
My West Marine Hyplon is fine after 1 year. Aluminum bottom and sole. The price was right.
 
I have had one of their 10' hypalon compact ribs since 2006. It is still doing fine. Mine is west marine branded but was made by zodiac.
 
I have a 10ft hypolon. I wish I had purchased a brand with more beam. The west marine is a bit skinny. Also with a 10hp it is hard to get on plane with one person. It is very nose up with engine at the lowest angle possible. When it finally levels out it it is ok but very twitchy. I added a whale tail on the motor and that heped alot. It is better mannered with two. A friends AB is a nicer boat.
 
My 3.10 single hull West planes nicely at around 15knots with a 8hp Yammie 4stroke with up to about 400 pounds of people and gear. Larger loads it seems like a 9.9 would be fine as it "almost gets on plane" and might if I played with trim a bit more...but maybe not.
 
Last edited:
My 3.10 single hull West planes nicely at around 15knots with a 8hp Yammie 4stroke with up to about 400 pounds of people and gear. Larger loads it seems like a 9.9 would be fine as it "almost gets on plane" and might if I played with trim a bit more...but maybe not.

Mine (West Marine Rib 275) would plane well with 2 people. 9.9 Suzuki 4 stroke.

https://www.westmarine.com/buy/west...MI156Yt8rf5AIVC18NCh0JJQifEAUYASABEgIuwPD_BwE

I painted the aluminum bottom with aluminum bottom paint and the tubes with the appropriate paint. Since then it has slowed way down. Just being able to plane with 1 person. Very odd?
 
My 10.3 is a little narrow but comes right up on plane with 9.8 tohatsu and 2 aboard. I did have some separation that was repaired under warranty. IMG_5476.jpgIMG_5664.jpg
 
Need to replace inflatable dingy.... Achilles?

In the last 8 years I have owned two PVC inflatable boats. The first one I bought used but looked in almost new condition.

After 2 seasons in the northeast the first boat blew out a 12 inch seam and you could see that other seams were headed for a similar failure quickly. That boat went to the dump.

The second PVC boat I bought new and was at the dingy dock for one season and tipped up on my dive platform for most of a second season. Again in the northeast. At his point the fabric was showing signs of sun damage and many areas of the boat were becoming sticky. The next 4 years this boat stayed under cover in my shed and taken out occasionally when I needed it (a few times a year). Now ALL the fittings are dropping off,...."D" rings, oar mounts rub strakes and such. Another PVC boat destined for the dump.

In the past I owned a Hypalon Zodiac and a Hypalon Brig inflatable. The Zodiac I bought used and owned for 10 or 15 years but it performed poorly under power. The Brig was a rib and its performance was fantastic. I sold it after about 4 years as my boating plans changed. I should have just kept that boat.

I am wondering what others have experienced with PVC inflatables. I think I am going to spend the little extra for Hypalon (now CSM) this time. I am specifically looking at Achilles and looking for feedback on those boats. I am looking at air floor or aluminum floor boats around 10 feet in length. I would buy another Brig but I don't want to spend that much on a boat I will only use ocassionally.
 
Sorry for the thread hijack. It was supposed to be a new thread!:banghead:
 
From what I have seen over the years, you really have to go with hypalon, and you really need to go brand new if possible.

When you buy used (unless it is from someone you know), you really are getting a pig in a poke. You have no idea how it was actually used, or abused.
 
Brig Inflatable for sale if interested

I have a Brig 11ft rib that came with the purchase of our trawler this past summer. It’s a 2007. It was professionally patched on one side when owned by the 1st owners. It works nice, no leaks, taken care of. we had no issues using it last season. Very roomy. We would be open to selling it as we would like to own a smaller inflatable since it’s just me and my wife cruising. It’s stored inside during the winters and has a cover when on the davit. Resides in NH in winter and CT Mystic during summer.

In the last 8 years I have owned two PVC inflatable boats. The first one I bought used but looked in almost new condition.

After 2 seasons in the northeast the first boat blew out a 12 inch seam and you could see that other seams were headed for a similar failure quickly. That boat went to the dump.

The second PVC boat I bought new and was at the dingy dock for one season and tipped up on my dive platform for most of a second season. Again in the northeast. At his point the fabric was showing signs of sun damage and many areas of the boat were becoming sticky. The next 4 years this boat stayed under cover in my shed and taken out occasionally when I needed it (a few times a year). Now ALL the fittings are dropping off,...."D" rings, oar mounts rub strakes and such. Another PVC boat destined for the dump.

In the past I owned a Hypalon Zodiac and a Hypalon Brig inflatable. The Zodiac I bought used and owned for 10 or 15 years but it performed poorly under power. The Brig was a rib and its performance was fantastic. I sold it after about 4 years as my boating plans changed. I should have just kept that boat.

I am wondering what others have experienced with PVC inflatables. I think I am going to spend the little extra for Hypalon (now CSM) this time. I am specifically looking at Achilles and looking for feedback on those boats. I am looking at air floor or aluminum floor boats around 10 feet in length. I would buy another Brig but I don't want to spend that much on a boat I will only use ocassionally.
 
I had a hypalon RIB. It was brand new and the seams started coming apart first time I used it. Replaced it with a Zodiac Pro PVC RIB. The Zodiac as a better boat all the way around. The key thing to get is one with the thermo welded seams (usually come from France). Much less chance of seams failing. Also get one with slide on tubes. Then if necessary the tubes can easily be removed from the hull for repair or replacement.

If you are in the south keep the PVC boat covered or use 303 Protectant on it.

In my experience, hypalon is not worth the money, but YMMV.
 
I would check for an over pressure relief valve on each chamber. Tubes have been known to burst when heat of the day raises internal pressure beyond seam capacity.
 
Hinkley, sounds like your Brig has been well cared for but it is still a 13 year old inflatable Too old of an inflatable boat for me to make an investment in and I don't really need the rigid hull these days. In all likelihood it is probably a better boat than many of the new PVC boats being sold new these days.
 
I run a 1976 Avon. Obviously, hypalon. 15hp on the 10 fter. The plywood floors need occasional work. They have had a hard life, transporting tanks and scooters.
I too, threw away a plastic Zodiac early in its life. PVC is for wire insulation and conduit.
 
Last edited:
Rounding this thread specifically back to the WM RIBS, I've been looking into them myself as I'm not too far from buying a new tender and the West Marine boats are an attractive price.


We currently have an 11' Carib Light (LT11), 2007 model. According to Carib's site it is 11'1" in length and weighs in at 154 lbs. The light model does not have a floor or anchor locker, just a single layer hull. I'm highly skeptical of that 154 lb claim. I think it weighs a good bit more than that.


The boat I'm looking at most closely is the Highfield 360 Classic. It's an aluminum double hull boat with separate anchor locker, 11'10" at 163 lbs. Looks like retail on it is around $7K.



The West Marine 350 RIB double floor is 11'5", fiberglass and weighs 161 lbs. So it is 6" shorter and weighs two pounds less. Retail cost on it is $3,600. So the weight of the fiberglass boat is basically the same as the aluminum boat? How could that be (other than it is slightly smaller)? Also, it's barely more than 1/2 the price, where is all of that cost savings come from?


Do y'all think the build quality is less? Is the layup thinner on the hull maybe? Lighter tube material? Or just less marketing?
 
Rounding this thread specifically back to the WM RIBS, I've been looking into them myself as I'm not too far from buying a new tender and the West Marine boats are an attractive price.


We currently have an 11' Carib Light (LT11), 2007 model. According to Carib's site it is 11'1" in length and weighs in at 154 lbs. The light model does not have a floor or anchor locker, just a single layer hull. I'm highly skeptical of that 154 lb claim. I think it weighs a good bit more than that.


The boat I'm looking at most closely is the Highfield 360 Classic. It's an aluminum double hull boat with separate anchor locker, 11'10" at 163 lbs. Looks like retail on it is around $7K.



The West Marine 350 RIB double floor is 11'5", fiberglass and weighs 161 lbs. So it is 6" shorter and weighs two pounds less. Retail cost on it is $3,600. So the weight of the fiberglass boat is basically the same as the aluminum boat? How could that be (other than it is slightly smaller)? Also, it's barely more than 1/2 the price, where is all of that cost savings come from?


Do y'all think the build quality is less? Is the layup thinner on the hull maybe? Lighter tube material? Or just less marketing?



Doug -just wondering what you ended up doing about buying a RIB? I have a 2004 Mainship 400 and just beginning my research for adding a RIB. Thinking of storing whatever I get on a set of Weaver Davits shown below. Apparently, they are removable.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07K6SWPN...imm_1J2ZEF179V8PHPKF1WST?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

Your thoughts?

T MacDonnell
Bay Retriever
2004 Mainship 400
 
IME, a RIB with thermowelded seams is better than glued. This means tubes made from PVC, not hypalon (or its equivalent). Usually the less expensive PVC boats are glued and sourced from the Far East.
 
I have a WM 310 hypalon aluminum floor rib. No build or quality issues. Had the boat 6 months. No bad seams or quality issues. Powered by Tohatsu 20 hp.
 
Im about to get a WM with my new to me boat next month.
Up till now, my primary inflatable is an Avon 3.1 that is a 1976 model. Its seen tough use in bahamas carrying divers, scooters, lobsters, spears, etc. Thats some 45 years old [emoji122]
 
I just picked up my WM RIB 350 the other day. I plan to outfit it with a console and a bench seat I got off of craigslist. I am planning to put a 20HP Yamaha on it.

I have owned a half dozen of RIBs and I have a 10 foot Avon high pressure floor model and a 21 foot Zodiac Hurricane. My worst experience with with a Zodiac 380 which the glue was separating from the bolt rope.

VT
 

Attachments

  • 20210419_130150.jpg
    20210419_130150.jpg
    181.2 KB · Views: 40
  • 20210418_095458.jpg
    20210418_095458.jpg
    96.1 KB · Views: 38
  • 20200731_173821 (1).jpg
    20200731_173821 (1).jpg
    162.5 KB · Views: 49
Well bits and pieces are starting to come in for the dinghy conversion.

Picked up a used 20HP Yamaha that I think will work well with this setup.

VT
 

Attachments

  • 20210427_194746 (1).jpg
    20210427_194746 (1).jpg
    94.2 KB · Views: 53
  • 20210427_194806.jpg
    20210427_194806.jpg
    112.4 KB · Views: 36
  • 20210423_195050.jpg
    20210423_195050.jpg
    107.3 KB · Views: 58
Back
Top Bottom