Advice requested: PSS bellows loose and leaking

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The hose barb on my PSS had been replaced by the P.O. with a brass one which is a no-no according to PYI.

Yesterday, when doing a post cruise inspection, I noticed water in the bilge caused by a steady stream from one of the PSS units. I saw that it was coming from the hose barb. The fitting was cracked at the base and broke off very easily as I was carefully removing the hose. Not good.

I did some internet research and learned that some folks with older PSS units replace their leaking nylon hose barbs with metal thinking that it's an upgrade. Which makes sense to me. But the person that I spoke to at PYI told me that this is a mistake. I pointed to him that the newer units come with stainless steel hose barbs and asked how that's different. He said that the metal hose barb on the newer units don't screw directly to the carbon material and has a lining/adapter in between. Only nylon hose barbs should be used for the older units.

If you have an older PSS, make sure the hose barb is nylon. It may just save you from the same stress I went through yesterday. It took a long time to remove the remaining brass piece out of the carbon stator and water was coming in during the process.

Can someone please explain why the brass fitting turned brittle. Was it the carbon material, salt water or something else. I did't want to ask too many questions from the PYI guy.
 

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It's the salt water. The zinc in the brass gets eaten away just like your protective zincs and leaved behind crumbling swiss cheese. Brass fittings are a no-no in salt water for this reason. Bronze has a much lower zinc content, so is OK to use.
 
nylon all the way and just protect it from loose cannon balls......
 
It’s probable the PO replaced it with ordinary big box store stuff. Yellow and red brass have no business on boats. Use bronze. Or stainless. This reminds me to check mine. Iirc it’s plastic. But one never knows what a P.O. did.

Google up Red Brass, Yellow Brass. And why not Brass underwater fittings.
 
I was told by the person that I spoke to at PYY that I should use nylon only for my vintage PSS after I asked him if I can use stainless like the newer models. I wonder if it's to avoid cracking the carbon stator. I should've asked more questions.

Very worried about the strarboard side now. I'm afraid the brass will just snap off if I unscrew it.
 
Very worried about the strarboard side now. I'm afraid the brass will just snap off if I unscrew it.


Better to plan and do it now than have it completely corrode off while you’re gone.

I have heard of people who completely wrap the entire gland, shaft and coupling with Satan wrap while they play around with it. Keeps the water stream to a minimum. I didn’t read. Do you live in warm water? If so. Go buy a wax toilet bowl ring from hardware store. Go swimming. On the outside, Put a ring of wax around the cutlass bearing on shaft. It will ‘suck in’ slightly. That will greatly lessen water ingress while you fiddle with the stator.
 
If it were me I would order a whole new graphite part with the new style hose barb when you next change out the bellows. (Buy the kit).

Another issue with the nylon ones is that they become a problem if you ever lose cooling water to it. It can get VERY hot and actually melt the barb fitting.

Just my 2 cents
 
BTW, I think the issue is that carbon is more noble than stainless, so when in contact you will get corrosion of the stainless. I know some people who have expressed a similar concern over the use of graphite shaft packing material. But that's why PSS doesn't want you to screw a stainless nipple directly into the graphite ring.
 
"Better to plan and do it now than have it completely corrode off while you’re gone."

Planning,

Look at the old broken brass one , and purchase a drill and an EZ Out BEFORE attempting the removal.
 
"Better to plan and do it now than have it completely corrode off while you’re gone."

Planning,

Look at the old broken brass one , and purchase a drill and an EZ Out BEFORE attempting the removal.

Thanks for the tip but I tried using an EZ Out but gave up on it because it kept wanting to go in further, and in my opinion, risking breaking the carbon stater, which would be a disaster. I ended up making two vertical groves inside for a flat head screwdriver to fit, lightly tapped the screwdriver in and unscrewed. The water stream actually helped flush the brass shavings out.
 
Hate to say it. But the other one is most likely exactly in same condition. Better get the other one done.
 
Starboard side is done. I unscrewed the hose barb very carefully and to my delight, it didn’t break even though the threads were already pinkish.

Happy that the brass fittings are gone but now worried it’s plastic. Can’t wait to address this at the next haul out.
 

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nylon fittings are plenty strong for the job, just not abuse.

they are nylon correct?

had them on our assistance towboats and had plenty more issues with the whole seal than just the nylon barb fitting.
 
nylon fittings are plenty strong for the job, just not abuse.

they are nylon correct?

had them on our assistance towboats and had plenty more issues with the whole seal than just the nylon barb fitting.

Yes, they’re nylon. Generic ones from West Marine. PYY doesn’t list them on their site.
 
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