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Old 05-08-2021, 07:02 PM   #21
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I'm shaking in my shoes after having read your post. What is the longest time you've ever spent with just the two of you cruising on a boat? Before you start selling and investing in a boat, do some chartering. Find a way to spend time on a boat but time when you're totally dependent on yourselves and your skills. The courses you have planned are great but don't help you with all the items breaking or with your seasickness or the loneliness being away from friends. I love boating and my wife and I are fanatics but we also both knew we loved it before we invested in it.
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Old 05-08-2021, 09:33 PM   #22
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After 5 years out here we still need to go back and address the house, car and crap issue.

Terribly irresponsible of us I know but we are too busy enjoying ourselves to care.
Maybe next year.
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Old 05-08-2021, 10:25 PM   #23
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Agree with all members' comments. I would add to consider a couple years of ownership and experience. There is a tremendous amount of knowledge and work involved with ownership. No way would I sell my house and all my things to live aboard. I love getting back home after an extended trip.*Careful your not chasing a pipe dream.
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Old 05-09-2021, 01:01 AM   #24
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. There is a tremendous amount of knowledge and work involved with ownership.
.
The same could be said for home ownership

And yet so many are out here cruising who clearly have no knowledge
Money sorts their problems out........until it doesn't.

Quote:
No way would I sell my house and all my things to live aboard
.

I agree, I wouldn't sell the house as that's an actual asset that can produce income

But things are just things, worthless to most.
Don't believe me? Try and sell them for anything like what you paid for them.
Quote:
I love getting back home after an extended trip.
It doesn't sound like the cruising life is really for you.
We were always the opposite when we had boats that weren't up for the job, saddened by the prospect of returning to dirt and dreaming of the day when we'd get a boat that would get us out here for real, full time, not beholden to marinas for support.
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Old 05-09-2021, 05:39 AM   #25
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TrawlerFest is a good suggestion as it's a few days of total immersion and many boats to see.

Your list of boats is mostly sedan style. You will have to look past the glossy pictures and get aboard boats. Often, seating is shallow and not comfortable for long term living. You'll have to decide whether a v-berth is adequate for long term. Is there adequate storage such as in the head - where will you hang towels, etc.

Topsides, Dinghy storage and deployment is important for long term use. Access to service points in engine room, etc. If you're you're water toy couple, definitely need to consider. If you're a dog owner, that's another consideration to make sure your companion can join you at the flybridge.

I have owned my Willard 36 for over 20 years. A W40 would probably be a better choice but the smaller 36 is fine for us. We could afford much more but prefer a more simple and austere boat. Trawler Forum has many voices, the most frequent lean towards larger boats that more closely emulate house-like amenities. We find those choices a distraction. You have to decide what style of cruising appeals to you. People rarely change their lifestyle significantly. If you're prone to eating out and love happy hours, you will likely spend a lot of time in marinas. That too will influence your choice of boat.

2 weeks ago, we closed on the sale of our house of 16 years. We have other options but I have to say, getting rid of all that stuff and responsibility is liberating. People often say they have more regrets about things they didn't do than did do. Last bit of guidance is the current boat market is extremely rare. Boats are typically difficult to unload, often taking years. Selling a liveaboard boat is even more difficult. Reversing your decision may not be trivial of cost free.

Good luck

Peter
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Old 05-09-2021, 07:26 AM   #26
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Check on insurance....might be some issues with getting coverage for a larger boat with no prior experience (if that's the case).
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Old 05-09-2021, 09:37 AM   #27
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While I don't live aboard I also had the dream of doing so when I bought my 1st boat. I loved it, my wife not so much. I never did sell my house but would fly from my Denver home to Florida for a 2-3 week stretch almost every month. Costly yes but I wanted to try it before I committed. On my second boat now and do plan on doing the loop. Started planning last year and hope to start next year. Some have suggested not trying to do it in 1 year, I think that's good advice. Too much to see to be in a hurry.

My best advice is as mentioned by others. You want to be handy as there are many things that will need fixing and upgrading. Some simple others not so. I've realized that this can be an expensive way to live, something many people don't realize. Bottom cleaning, slip rental, insurance, upgrades, repairs, etc. etc. etc. And if you keep it in a hurricane zone (Texas to Massachusetts), you might want to have a hurricane plan. There is a very large thread here on annual costs. Read every response. 10% of initial cost annually is realistic. Some years less, some more. Also once you decide what you would like to buy, come back here and ask lots of questions. Also there are other forums like Face Book and others although I think this is the best I've found. Many friendly and helpful people with little politics. Good luck on your search.
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Old 05-09-2021, 09:39 AM   #28
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It doesn't sound like the cruising life is really for you.
We were always the opposite when we had boats that weren't up for the job, saddened by the prospect of returning to dirt and dreaming of the day when we'd get a boat that would get us out here for real, full time, not beholden to marinas for support.
Wifey B: Well, we cruise 2/3 of the time but the fact we like returning home doesn't mean cruising isn't for us. We also love the next cruise. Just have friends and extended family at home we miss just like we miss the water. Torn between two lovers so to speak.
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Old 05-09-2021, 10:06 AM   #29
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Wifey B: To the OP. I know there's a lot of discouragement in this thread and proud of TF'ers for it. See, had you posted the same in a sister forum with a bunch of sailors it would have been all "drop everything, leave the world you know behind, doesn't matter if you're broke, doesn't matter if you have no idea what you do, we survived and those who died on the way don't post."

Seriously, those of us here love cruising. Some a little, some more, some with fanaticism. Meanwhile, you're in that infamous slot of TBD.

Just proceed cautiously and with a plan that will let you figure it out on your and your wife's own terms. We had no idea when we jumped in of how much. We'd moved to FL, left NC behind but bought a house in FL and then boats and now how much to cruise. So, off we went. Now, my hubby's famous theory of pain when he uses for a bazillion things. Off we went. Four weeks, great. Six weeks and we sort of longed to see those at home. So home and a week was great. Two was good but at three oh we longed to return to the boat. That's been mostly our pattern. Occasionally stretched to 8 weeks. This last year cruising has been short trips and we miss the extended cruises. Now we have a friend who is one month on, one month off. I laugh about his theory of pain but I don't know another way better than figuring it out on the fly.

We've got a dream cruise planned for this summer. 3 months in Schengen countries, another month or so in non-Schengen European countries. Omfg, I'm so excited. But......

I just can't be away from my family and extended family and friends and everything here for 4 months or more. I knot that. Fortunately hubby feels the same. So, we're already figuring out how to take a break, fly home, how long to be here plus how to get a trip to NC and SC right before and after to see the kids at the orphanage in NC and the kids at the school in SC and it's not some great altruism all for them, it's our need to see them. And how long a break and for retired people it's sick that we want to go into the office at least a couple of days and see everyone.

See, we love life and love our lives but we love so much so much that it just overflows and since we just can't clone our way through we have to balance things the best we know how. We're still learning as we haven't faced anything like the European trip and it doesn't come after a lot of other cruises but after us actually working 5 days a week again for a year. (Thank god for work when we couldn't do long cruises as it saved that very tiny bit of sanity I have).

I hope you love boating and the water as much as I do. Just you can't force it. You can't look out there and decide I'll love full time because I decided I will. Ease into the decision and the actual. Find your way.

Funny, selling our house in NC was easy. But now..I could never sell my house or boat. But if I must sell something I'd have the house and friends and small boat for lots of local boating and sacrifice the long major cruises as I could never sacrifice my family at home. I never imagined this being me, but think it comes with so long of not having a family. So it's personal and applies to no one else. But lots of ways of boating. We lived on a lake and boating was a bowrider and loved it and that was before I knew anymore. Now I want to cruise the world.

We're in the boating capital of the universe, but very few full time liveaboards. I see those like Simi who are incredibly happy with that lifestyle and I cheer. But we also live around canals full of people with extravagant homes and while some have yachts, some have center consoles and their boating is up and down the ICW and for dinner and fireworks and festivals.

Do it your way.
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Old 05-09-2021, 10:32 AM   #30
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My 2 cents FWIW:
Take your time settling on a boat. It takes years to learn all the differences between boat makers, pros and cons, fiberglass types, engine mfrs and types. Many of us are on our 2nd, 3rd, and 4th boats. Following your direction you may not have the luxury of learning by buying the wrong boat 2 or 3 times. You lose money every time. So my advice would be to know what your boat really needs to do, list those out (which you've started nicely), then ruthlessly compare it to every boat you see. Over the next 16 months I feel you should spend as much time as possible looking at Yachtworld, doing searches, reading every ad that has a boat mildly close to your requirements, and then researching every term, mfr, and engine you see there. Every term you don't understand, fuel and water tank sizes, layouts, etc. I learned the most valuable things by reading Yachtworld ads. Doing so produced questions that I needed to learn answers to. I thot I fell in love with THE boat probably 20 times throughout the learning process. Over a 3 year period the right vessel slowly surfaced and became the clear "right choice" for us. The only choice, in fact, that met our requirements.

If you're not an experienced boater, you can still become a studied expert on boats, like a guy who knows the pros and cons and stats of a football or baseball player - he may not play the game, but he knows what "good" and right looks like. And it's worth it. Live without regrets. Best of luck to you.

Excellent advice!

For OP: Yes, read everything. Chapman's, Beebe, every other book on boating, 5-6 boating magazines, local boating newsletters, on-line fora and blogs... whatever you can get your hands/eyes on. Pics can be especially helpful, especially useful for translating jargon into something you can understand.

We were also lucky enough to stumble into a very good buyer's broker a few decades ago... who shepherded us into our first "big" boat... that essentially meant we bought our third boat first. Great boat, met all of our then-current criteria... and it turned out to be absolutely the best choice we could have afforded at the time, too.

Fast forward, with two more boats in between... we're currently boatless but hopefully homing in our approximately "8th" boat. Much of that leapfrogging has been the product of defining our own target criteria -- specific features we want -- in advance, and even at the same time quickly eliminating for consideration boats that have features we don't like.

Ideally, you'll get to where you know what you like, what you don't like, what you want, what you don't want... and why... and what it all costs. If it turns out you proceed with the plan, you'll be well-prepped... but even if you don't, you'll know exactly why not. I often feel the "knowing why" is more important than whatever the decision is.

I haven't been to Muncie in quite a long time...

-Chris
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Old 05-09-2021, 01:51 PM   #31
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After doing some fishing yesterday I sat down and had a cold beer.
The day was quite beautiful, and my drink facilitated some deep thinking.
My wife walked by and asked what I was doing. I said, "Nothing."
Now the reason I said "nothing" instead of saying "just thinking" is because she then would have asked, "Thinking about what?"
At that point I would have had to explain that men are deep thinkers about various topics, which would lead to other questions. She left me alone.
After another beer I pondered the age old question:
What is more painful, giving birth or getting kicked in the nuts?
Women always maintain that giving birth is way more painful than a guy getting kicked in the nuts, but how could they know?
Well, after another beer or two, and some more heavy deductive thinking, I have come up with the answer to that question.
Getting kicked in the nuts is more painful than having a baby. Even though I obviously couldn't really know, here is the reason for my conclusion:
A year or so after giving birth, a woman will often say, "It might be nice to have another child."
I have never heard a guy say, "You know, I think I would like another kick in the nuts."
I rest my case.
Time for another beer.
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Old 05-09-2021, 05:55 PM   #32
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Welcome aboard! After taking the training courses, charter a trawler for a week with a captain. You will need some experience to get insurance when you buy that nice yacht sailing through your dreams, not to mention also keep it in one piece.
Enjoy the dream!
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Old 05-09-2021, 06:26 PM   #33
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If you are an accumulator focusing on cheap internet buys (like Cragi's list), there won't be a boat big enough.
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Old 05-14-2021, 03:32 PM   #34
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Trawlerfest is in Newport this summer - spending days there and talking to everyone you can may be the ideal place for you to gain some idea of boat type, lifestyle etc..
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Old 05-14-2021, 06:35 PM   #35
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Research Research Research

Consider leasing your home. You still have to get rid of your stuff, if you are successful cruisers you will never want that stuff back anyway. You can get a realtor to manage your home for 8-11%. Worth it!
Step on lots of boats, find a buyers broker who will work with you till you find the right boat. Find the best independent surveyor in the area when you think you have found the right boat. Get training and hang out with experienced boaters. Stay focused!
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Old 05-16-2021, 05:52 PM   #36
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This year will be our third season with our boat. Buying the boat was my idea to fulfill a lifelong dream of a months long Alaskan summer cruise. Our largest previous boat was a 24' sailboat. Turned out my wife doesn't share my passion for sailing but said she'd be open to the idea with a power boat. Fine with me, I just want to be on the water. So that was a green light as far as I was concerned and within 3 months we were fortunate to find a boat that checked all the boxes for us.



Last summer we took our first extended cruise, 2 weeks, and on the return trip she said next (now this) year she wants to go for 4 weeks. I think that she may now like boating more than I do.



We have a home on acreage. While it was a fantastic place to raise our children, I have grown very tired of the tremendous amount of work required to keep it up so we are now selling and downsizing.



Our plan is to buy a condo so we can pack up and leave whenever and for as long as we want without requiring a caretaker when we are gone. Our summers will be spent cruising the PNW, winters will be spent traveling to warm places, and the in-between times at the condo and making the boat ready.


I am 63 and my wife 58. We have worked our tails off and sacrificed much over the years. Our last boomerang child is finally in a good place and on their own as of last week. Now it's our time and we intend to make the most of the years we have left together. Our adult children and extended family are just going to have to manage without us always being conveniently available to them.
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Old 05-17-2021, 06:32 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingston Mariner View Post
This year will be our third season with our boat. Buying the boat was my idea to fulfill a lifelong dream of a months long Alaskan summer cruise. Our largest previous boat was a 24' sailboat. Turned out my wife doesn't share my passion for sailing but said she'd be open to the idea with a power boat. Fine with me, I just want to be on the water. So that was a green light as far as I was concerned and within 3 months we were fortunate to find a boat that checked all the boxes for us.



Last summer we took our first extended cruise, 2 weeks, and on the return trip she said next (now this) year she wants to go for 4 weeks. I think that she may now like boating more than I do.



We have a home on acreage. While it was a fantastic place to raise our children, I have grown very tired of the tremendous amount of work required to keep it up so we are now selling and downsizing.



Our plan is to buy a condo so we can pack up and leave whenever and for as long as we want without requiring a caretaker when we are gone. Our summers will be spent cruising the PNW, winters will be spent traveling to warm places, and the in-between times at the condo and making the boat ready.


I am 63 and my wife 58. We have worked our tails off and sacrificed much over the years. Our last boomerang child is finally in a good place and on their own as of last week. Now it's our time and we intend to make the most of the years we have left together. Our adult children and extended family are just going to have to manage without us always being conveniently available to them.

Congratulations!!! You tried it, you BOTH liked it! As long as its fun, the expense is manageable, you look forward to doing it and look back on your adventures, it will continue to be an enjoyable adventure. Once the fun stops, time to move on.
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Old 05-17-2021, 04:56 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingston Mariner View Post
.


I am 63 and my wife 58. We have worked our tails off and sacrificed much over the years. Our last boomerang child is finally in a good place and on their own as of last week. Now it's our time and we intend to make the most of the years we have left together. Our adult children and extended family are just going to have to manage without us always being conveniently available to them.
Yep, never had kids
If I wanted a pet I'd buy a cat (we did), cheaper and easier
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Old 05-17-2021, 07:05 PM   #39
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Retirement Vision

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Hi All,
First time posting here. I plan to retire within the next 16 months or so, and my wife and I plan sell the house, vehicles, and most of our possessions. I didn't have a vision at all for retirement until I saw an ad for a trawler. I showed it to her and said how about this for retirement? She said let's do it! Although I won't be buying that particular trawler, we now have a vision for retirement and it can't come too soon.
Our plan is to take a couple of weeklong seamanship courses over the next year, buy a trawler, trial run it for a few months, do the Great Loop, then Bahamas, and have a live-aboard lifestyle. We're reading/watching everything that we can about the lifestyle in the meantime.

Here are my trawler specs:
- 35-45 ft
- full/semi displacement
- single engine/low horsepower
- double berths
- no older than 1998
- boat purchase budget is $110,000-$200,000

My questions:
- should I include older boats in my search?
- Max number of hours on the engine?
- engines to avoid?

I'm liking the following models:
- Heritage East
- Mariner (38 Sundeck/Orient)
- Mainship (370/390)
- Marine Trader (Europa)
- Island Packet PY

Any comments/recommendations will be appreciated.
Thank you.
I'll just throw out a couple of things for you to consider. First, what is your boating experience and what have you owned? Obtaining insurance on a 35-45' boat if you've never owned something close to that size will be difficult. Make sure you can get insurance before you buy. Second, getting a 1998 35-45' boat for $100-$200k may be difficult. I would look at older boats. Well maintained diesel engines will run for 10,000 hrs or more before needing anything serious done to them. Thirdly, if you are not an experienced boater, selling everything and moving onto a boat is a really big step. While it's a romantic idea, the reality of doing that can be quite different than your expectations. Fourth, count on spending 10%/year of the cost of your boat on dockage, maintenance, insurance, fuel, and misc expenses.
With no more knowledge than I have of your situation I would recommend that you take a trawler handling course with your wife, do some chartering and then maybe downsize and have a small apartment ashore and a boat close by to get some experience before you just sell everything and cast off.
In any case, good luck.
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Old 05-17-2021, 07:12 PM   #40
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Retirement Vision

Quote:
Originally Posted by swa View Post
after doing some fishing yesterday i sat down and had a cold beer.
The day was quite beautiful, and my drink facilitated some deep thinking.
My wife walked by and asked what i was doing. I said, "nothing."
now the reason i said "nothing" instead of saying "just thinking" is because she then would have asked, "thinking about what?"
at that point i would have had to explain that men are deep thinkers about various topics, which would lead to other questions. She left me alone.
After another beer i pondered the age old question:
What is more painful, giving birth or getting kicked in the nuts?
Women always maintain that giving birth is way more painful than a guy getting kicked in the nuts, but how could they know?
Well, after another beer or two, and some more heavy deductive thinking, i have come up with the answer to that question.
Getting kicked in the nuts is more painful than having a baby. Even though i obviously couldn't really know, here is the reason for my conclusion:
A year or so after giving birth, a woman will often say, "it might be nice to have another child."
i have never heard a guy say, "you know, i think i would like another kick in the nuts."
i rest my case.
Time for another beer.
wtf?
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