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Old 01-07-2019, 04:42 PM   #21
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Awl "products" seem real popular in the PNW. Had my caprail done with it a few months ago, awesome is all I can say.
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Old 01-07-2019, 05:03 PM   #22
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Bilge always needs draining...

Hi, I have a Hirshire 37 (1980) that I have been working on for the past year and a half since it was out of the water for hull refinsihing. My concern is that I empty the bilge every time it rains.



The boat needed everything done including teak refinishing, gel coat done, finding and repair water leaks above the water line. I've repaired fiberglass where the deck meets the teak deck, holes on either sides forward below the portholes. Just wondering if you have any other suggestions about where water leaks might occur?
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Old 01-07-2019, 05:11 PM   #23
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Another vote for Cetol. Orange or clear, lasts for years.
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Old 01-07-2019, 05:16 PM   #24
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Yes, I have used Cetol on all the teak work... Have you had any water problems?
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Old 01-07-2019, 07:36 PM   #25
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Unicorn V is a 1981 GB 36CL with all the original teak trim bits of that era in addition to the hand rails and cap rails. Miles of teak. In about 2004 I had her teak stripped to bare wood followed by 2 coats of CPES and then multiple coats of Epifanes varnish which I tried unsuccessfully to refresh each year. In 2009 I had it stripped to wood again but after speaking to some converts and impressed with their results I decided to try Cetol, with 2 coats of the Cetol marine followed with 3 (I think) of Cetol gloss. Very happy with the results. Dock comments are all positive. Every two years I applied 2 more coats of gloss until about 2013 or 2014 when I let it ride. By 2018 it still looked fresh but I decided not to push my luck so did 2 coats last September. She is in a shed but spends a solid 3 months each year cruising (250-300hrs/year). It is easy to apply and repair.
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Old 01-07-2019, 08:30 PM   #26
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Cetol is just plain ugly. If it works for you great. It certainly has a longer life than varnish.

Is about 3 times the cost of Captains Varnish. Does it go three times as far coverage wise?

- Hard to answer. Varnish comes in quarts and Alwood comes .67 of a quart. I am looking to make it up in longevity. Unfortunately itís too soon for me to give you an honest opinion on life expectancy.

I have not had to do touch ups or recoats so I canít speak to those items either. The final look is gorgeous, even better than varnish.
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Old 01-07-2019, 09:12 PM   #27
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I have a 46 GB classic and use Cetol. Base is three coats of natural teak and than three coats of gloss. Each year I lightly sand and apply a maintenance coat of gloss. If I need to repair I tape off the damaged area, sand to bare wood, coat with three coats of natural teak sand lightly and apply tow coats of gloss. The system does not look as good as ten coats of varnish but it is close enough and the maintenance and durability is well worth it. More time boating!
CETOL remains the best.
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Old 01-07-2019, 10:11 PM   #28
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The teak on my GB36 was pretty bad. Heat gun stripped it in a weekend, whole boat. Bleached teak twice, let dry, then used Aelwood yellow primer. Incredible deapth of color. It is so hard, we step on the teak gunnels and it has never scratched. It can be buffed. It can be thinned to really lay down. They claim five years before sanding and adding two coats, I am at year three.

It is expensive, but I don't have time to screw with it every couple of years. What is your time worth?
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Old 01-07-2019, 10:23 PM   #29
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For a 32 figure 5 cans at least. I have seen it for $75 a can and under $40.

Compared to Cetol, Awlwood is like glass clear, Cetol like motor oil. No comparison.

Awlwood is a single stage but has Imron type properties. Buy a can and play with it, or call the Awlwood rep direct, and get in a yard that uses it to see it being applied.
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Old 01-08-2019, 01:33 AM   #30
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When we took delivery of our new Fleming 55 in 2003, she had beautifully varnished caprails. But within a few months, white blooms appeared underneath.

I was told this was becasue it was damp when the varnish was applied. Under warranty, I was offerd a full re-varnish or removal to clean teak.

Seeing the hours and hours and hours varnished boats require to keep the varnished teak looking good, I opted for clean teak and the natural look.

Maintaing Play d'eau takes enough time, so not having varnish to take even more time, is a bonus.

And the greying teak matches my hair!
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Old 01-08-2019, 03:02 AM   #31
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The two parts are great, messy, time consuming and expensive. If I'm taking teak down to bare wood, after sanding with 150 I mix an epoxy resin, thinned about 30% so it's nice and watery and will penetrate the wood. The first time I did this the next day I thought I'd made a mess but it sanded out beautifully and sealed the wood. Then I applied another coat thinned about 10 to 15%. When cured I re-sanded and applied a minimum of four coats Tung oil varnish, sanding (220) between coats (slow process) or three or four coats of a two-part LP varnish wet sanding between the final two coats.
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Old 01-08-2019, 06:17 AM   #32
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I would agree there are some ugly Cetol jobs out there. The original Cetol turned orange or sh** brown. Plain ugly! Don’t sell the newer Cetol products short. 3 coats of the Natural Light and 2 coats of clear gloss fools a lot of people into thinking it is varnish. If you sand between coats of clear (3 coats needed if you sand) it comes out pretty damn nice. It is much easier to apply, is repairable, and lasts a solid 3 seasons before needing another coat of clear here in the northeast.
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Old 01-08-2019, 11:59 AM   #33
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Well, GBBayfield, you now have a cacophony of responses. Let me add one more. I have used Bristol and it was OK, went on fast, I had no problems with it kicking off early. Only issue was the last coat on a hatch cover was applied late in the day, sunset then dew and white haze was the result. Sand it off and do it over!. My preferred solution nowadays for handrails is two coats of CPES, light sand, tack, 7 - 8 coats of Schooner or Jamestown Gleam. Used this approach on my wooden ketch, 42 feet of maintenance intensive floating furniture.
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Old 01-08-2019, 11:28 PM   #34
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Varnish

Has anyone used Epifanes?
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Old 01-08-2019, 11:55 PM   #35
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Has anyone used Epifanes?
YES

Over the years I have tried most of what is available. Once I discovered Epifanes, I liked it so much better than any others that I stopped trying other brands. I now keep my boat covered 6 months and have it outside 6 months. I use one or two quarts of Epifanes a year to keep up the varnish. This summer I took the three fwd deck hatches off and did a full scrape to bare wood and 5 coats of Epifanes on them, one coat on about 1/2 of the remaining varnished wood. Next year I will get the other 1/2. If there are any holes, I will fill them first with 3 or more coats, but there are usually several boards on the less exposed teak that will go three or even four years between coats.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:38 AM   #36
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Bryant: I am sure that by reading through these responses, you have found as many different answers as TF members. I have used Epifanes and it worked well. I did find it more vicious than Schooner and IMHO it did not flow as well. So I went back to Schooner and Jamestown's Gleam. My advice: Try it if it works for you go for it. None of this is rocket science, try them then stick with what you like
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:44 AM   #37
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Epifanes is used by Fleming.
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Old 01-09-2019, 11:21 AM   #38
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Has anyone used Epifanes?

Eptphanes is the varnish with t he highest solids content, but it is difficult to apply in windy conditions. Mirror finish is possible in still conditions. Refurbished bulwark caps and rails on my 423 Classic which spends 6 months in Bahamian sun per year....excellent gloss retention, maintenance coat every 2 years keeps it flawless.

Photos here

https://1drv.ms/a/s!AsNFZsAKNwRLnnyA5BRF0mqkAXVh

Toying with the idea of over coating with 2 part next year...... following....
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Old 01-09-2019, 11:28 AM   #39
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Yes, I have used Cetol on all the teak work... Have you had any water problems?

No.
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Old 01-09-2019, 11:30 AM   #40
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And the greying teak matches my hair!

There you go.
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