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Old 04-12-2020, 04:31 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Pete Meisinger View Post
I get a chuckle out of comments like "I have 10,000 hours on my injectors, they are still going strong" or "I never change my impellers, never had a problem" Or "I don't change my secondary filters, the primary filters catch everything.

Heck, (true story) my father NEVER changed the oil in his cars. He would buy them new, run them until he got bored with them, usually a couple to three years and then trade them off. Original oil and all.

You could open the hood on dad's car and everything looked great, good as new! Probably the exact same scenario with all the other examples I cited. Things may look good on the outside but what is happening inside the engine???

pete

First off, what Ski said!!!

Secondly, Do you replace the control arms on your car on a regular basis??? What about the exhaust system??? The point being injectors generally don’t fail. Just like control arms and exhaust systems on cars don’t fail. They can fail and they do fail. But they aren’t things that require periodic maintenance. You start investigating or changing injectors when their are symptoms. No need to do it otherwise. Tony Athens even says “It is very rare that injectors are the problem.”....for whatever.
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Old 04-14-2020, 10:41 AM   #22
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Yes, replacing all zincs too. There is certainly a lot to do when getting a new boat especially when not knowing full history or having the previous owner to explain things.

The smoke it a greyish blue I would say.

I will warm up under light load, that makes sense.
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:00 AM   #23
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I pulled the exhaust elbow off the turbo to inspect the turbo, elbow, and exhaust hose. The turbo did not appear to have any water damage. The turbo is pretty heavily caked with carbon build up. The elbow has a lot of carbon build up but appears to be in pretty good shape. The exhaust hose is shot. It was de-laminating on the inside and had almost completely blown through one spot. I understand the design problem and need to contact National Marine Exhaust. They have been recommended by multiple people so far. But, I can't do it all at once. I'll clean the elbow and turbo and reinstall them with a new exhaust hose. That one lasted 20 years, surely I have a little time to use the boat, monitor and assess.

I am concerned about the carbon build up and wonder if it is a bit excessive. It appears the engine is burning some oil.

I don't have enough history with the boat yet to establish a baseline or have a good understanding how it is working, if it is burning oil or how much it is burning.

I'll put it back together and use it. I'll mark temperatures on the engine and use an IR gun to look for and mark hotspots on the exhaust hose too. That information and the old hose will be useful for National Marine Exhaust when the time comes.

Based on some recommendations, I am replacing the coolant pump, idler pulley and raw water pump as well.
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:03 AM   #24
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Is the Killer Dowel Pin a thing? A friend said it has been an issue and a necessary fix for cummins 5.9s in this year range (mine is a 2000). I searched the forums and found very little. There is a lot in the truck realm, but very little on boat forums. Almost nothing on sbmar as well, other than one person asking about it.
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:23 AM   #25
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Lat, I wouldn't worry to much about using oil....unless it is a significant amount. Also, if you are unaware of the problems with the shallow oil pan on the 6BTA, but there are issues that could be causing your percieved oil burn. If you are fillinf your engine all the way to the top of the stick, it might be whipping the oil and burning it or blowing it out. Try letting it "disappear" and see if it finds a happy spot on the stick before going below the "low" line. If it does, leave it. I have an old air cooled Porsche that does this. If you fill it all the way with oil, it will burn it until it gets to the lower part of the stick and then it stabilizes. It is well known with those cars and this is well known with these engines.

Either way, a small amount of oil burn is not something to be terribly concerned about.
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:30 AM   #26
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If boat has been run at low power, that carbon can really build up. Does not mean it is using oil. Best to get it out on the water and run the engines up to higher power setting.
No need to go full power, but up to like 2400 for a B330 which is rated at 2800. That will burn most of the carbon out. 15min should do it.
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:36 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lat58 View Post
Is the Killer Dowel Pin a thing? A friend said it has been an issue and a necessary fix for cummins 5.9s in this year range (mine is a 2000). I searched the forums and found very little. There is a lot in the truck realm, but very little on boat forums. Almost nothing on sbmar as well, other than one person asking about it.
I called SBMAR. They said KDP issues involved motors in the early 90s and VERY rarely in marine world. If anyone would know, I would guess they would.
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:44 AM   #28
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I called SBMAR. They said KDP issues involved motors in the early 90s and VERY rarely in marine world. If anyone would know, I would guess they would.
I have never heard of it....and have been a Cummins Owner for a while. Those 330Bs are really good engines. I ran mine at 2300-2400 all the time. I was slightly underpropped as well. I would expect many more thousands of hours even at that higher power setting. They weren't even breaking a sweat. My current boat has 450Cs and is somewhat "overpowered"....most of my models were made with the 370Bs. I can cruise at an "easy" 20 knots but push it up to around 25kts at MCP of 2400. But, I never run it up there....as I never ran my Bs at 2600RPM...MCP. But they could sure as hell handle it as long as your cooling system is healthy and you are not overpropped.
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:46 AM   #29
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Thanks for the info about the oil burning. I will monitor it, and resist the temptation to constantly top it off.
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Old 04-14-2020, 12:21 PM   #30
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8knt and burning 2 GPH is excellent!!! We have a QSB5.9 - 305hp and burn 5-6 GPH @ 8kts (1800 rpms)...

Cummins alternator is only good for 2000 hrs. Check alternator temp/volt/amps frequently - should be 175 degrees/26-28v/80-200amps?. Have a rebuld kit on bvoard and a full spare alternator to swap out.

Genset: exhaust elbow check frequiently, replace every 5 years and have a spare Stainless Steel one on board.

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Old 04-14-2020, 12:30 PM   #31
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Hi Lat58,
I was exactly where you are now, 3.5 years ago. Don't wait too long on the exhaust elbow issue. My elbow looked brand new on the outside (at 15 years old) and visually looked good inside as well, except it showed signs of carbon build up (not unusual for an exhaust elbow) and my hose visually looked OK. However, the Borel exhaust alarm I had installed a few months before sounded repeatedly. I could not find the problem, but strongly suspected the elbow. Finally I sent all of my cooling components (aftercooler, fuel cooler, gear oil cooler, heat exchanger, and elbow) into the shop for cleaning, inspection and testing. When fully cleaned, it became apparent that my elbow was "rotted through" in several (small) places, and this was causing the hose overheat. The overheat was only on a small spot on the exhaust hose, all other engine temps (as measured with an IR gun) were very good. Without that alarm, I would not have known about this problem as ALL other temps were very good. You can see many photos of turbos on Tony's site where this exact problem was left too long (probably because it was undetected). He calls those elbows "Doomed to Fail". The alarm I talked about cost about $100 and was easy to install. Saltwater leaking back into the turbo will not only cause damage to the turbo, but in more serious cases can damage the engine as well compounding the problems and costs can escalate greatly.
This info is on sbmar as well, but per Baker, don't "overfill" your oil pan. Per Tony, prefill your oil filter with clean oil and put 13 quarts of oil into the pan. Mark the stick, and keep it at that level. This is actually the "low oil" mark (if the stick is correctly marked and that may not be the case) and for marine applications you don't want more oil in the pan than that (according to Tony, and I trust him). He explains the reasoning in his info.

Sounds like you are well on your way, but (and I know money does not grow on trees) I would not put off the exhaust elbow too long (reasons above and on Tony's site).
As Ski stated, every few trips run up the RPM's to burn out the carbon (Tony agrees with that as well) and don't idle at dock to "cool down" either. The slow run in and docking should be enough of a cool down. Diesels don't like idling for long periods under no load.

Enjoy your new (to you) Tug.
Tom
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Old 04-14-2020, 12:36 PM   #32
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If you are looking for a parameter....I am pretty sure the manual says "1 hour of running under significant load for every 8 hours of lightly loaded running". That is paraphrasing but you get the idea. Don't be afraid to run that NT at 13-14kts for awhile....Cummins is begging you to do it. Consider the added fuel burn while doing this as preventative maintenance....and it is definitely a nominal amount.
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