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Old 05-11-2018, 03:27 AM   #21
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I use the information I glean to make my choice. You can't have too much information.
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Old 05-11-2018, 03:59 AM   #22
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We have soft decks, part of the reason we got our boat so very cheap.
Ours are 17mm ply over frames and epoxy was a dirty word.

2 ways it can be fixed.
Version one from a boat builder mate who had a timber trawler is, as you fall through a soft spot chop it out and scarf back in a fresh bit of ply that's had a good drink of resin and glass over.
This has been our method thus far, a few hours here a few hours there, patchwork quilt and use the boat.

Version 2 which we will start implementing soon is to get nidaplast, polycore, whatever you want to call it and start cutting it to shape and laminating up panels at our leisure and marking them so later, we can simply remove a large matching section and replace it with plastic.
Done.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:10 AM   #23
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Quote:
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What about solid fiberglass hulls? They seem pretty strong.
Yes but not horizontal decks that get walked on. Sandwich construction is what makes them stiff.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:20 AM   #24
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I did many of the decks on my "ex" Mainship I. I cut the skin and trashed it, then scraped out all the wet core material and let it dry. It was completely soaked in some areas.
I consulted a local fiberglass supply house and followed their suggestions.
5/8 exterior plywood for a core. Cut into pieces so I didn't have t build the contour out of plywood. Prepped all plywood surfaces with poly resin mixed with 25% acetone to allow penetration. drilled 1 inch holes in several places on each ply piece. Used "Bondo-lite" (regular bondo will work) to stick the ply to the base (bondo is compatable with poly resin). Used bricks to hold the ply till cured (10 minutes). Scraped off the bondo that ozzed thru the holes.
One payer of 1 1/2 oz mat material with resin, then woven roving over that to stitch the ply pieces together into one. Then 3 more layers of mat/resin.
After allowing the week to cure, we ground the contour back onto the flybridge deck with a 7 inch disk grinder.
Followed up with 2 coats of vinylester gelcoat tinted light gray with non skid mixed in.
Came out mint.

The job took 3 weekends. 2 of the days I had another couple help us.
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Old 05-11-2018, 09:20 AM   #25
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What about solid fiberglass hulls? They seem pretty strong.
Hulls have BIG Strong stringers spaced fairly close vs flybridge decks.
Agree w others the core gives the outside layers stength due to the ctoss section.

I redid a cored swim deck as others suggested but omitted the core anywhere there were pentratipns and built up w glass & resin NO worries about future sealing or leakage.
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Old 05-11-2018, 10:21 AM   #26
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The Mainship balsa was ruined by know nothing dealers allowing ignorant riggers to finish out the boats drilling into balsa cores improperly mounting seats, hardware and so forth. A shame really, they started the clock on the water intrusion problems that appeared after any hope of warranty adjustment

There are post that can be found using the search option on here with many suggestions as to what works, what does not and what might.

Suggest that you not do as a friend of mine that had ground out blisters, sanded hull and after he had done much work painted the bottom (against All advice and protest) in a rainstorm to meet his schedule because he just had to git er done.

I bet you can guess rhe rest of the story. Don’t be that guy.
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Old 05-18-2018, 08:34 PM   #27
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We recently purchased a trawler with a teak covered sun deck (which I swore I would never do). The Admiral liked the boat and I couldn't find a good reason not to buy it (I tried) my only condition was the teak had to come off because it was soft in several spots and not worth the effort to save it. Covering it only delays the inevitable removal and increases the likelihood of even more costly repairs.

We've lived with it for two seasons but she goes in this month to have it all removed and replaced with anti skid fiberglass. The fly bridge deck was re-cored and re-glassed the year we got it. The two pictures are the same fly bridge with a lot of improvements.
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Old 05-19-2018, 03:56 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrwesson View Post
What about solid fiberglass hulls? They seem pretty strong.
That is a good question.

The answer is that hulls are never flat.
If they were, they would have to be much thicker. Their shape gives them the strength they need, along with the keel and stringers.. A flat piece of thick fibreglass will still flex and sag.
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Old 05-19-2018, 05:39 AM   #29
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Iíve done it on decks before and itís worked great ...it was on a cockpit deck that was removable ..about 8í x 7í ... added the glass underneath... worked great
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Old 05-20-2018, 07:18 AM   #30
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"Sandwich construction is what makes them stiff. "

Sandwich construction is a way to make then thick (therefore stiff) at lower cost and weight than solid GRP.

Most of the early glass boats had solid decks and PH , and do not suffer rot.

Plywood core was chosen for most TT as there was no deck or cabin mold so it was a cheap ez method to create needed surfaces .


Vessel structure longevity was never a consideration for TT builders, 30-40 years ago.
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Old 05-20-2018, 09:03 AM   #31
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I decided against doing it but from what i've read that many sailboats have solid glass decks and they are very strong..

It costs alot to lay up 5-8 layers of fiberglass vs encapsulating a core using the sandwich method. It's also lighter but in most cases not stronger.

The hulls of many boats are solid fiberglass and I know they have stringers but many of the sides of the hull don't.

One complaint about solid fiberglass decks is that they do not insulate well and tend to sweat on the inside.
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Old 05-20-2018, 10:54 AM   #32
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Quote:
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Iíve done it on decks before and itís worked great ...it was on a cockpit deck that was removable ..about 8í x 7í ... added the glass underneath... worked great
Yes, but does the original deck have a core in it? Most likely it will and the glass you added just strengthened the bottom side of the ďIĒ beam. A lot of builders donít lay much glass on the bottom side of the core and adding more will stiffen the deck up nicely.
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Old 05-21-2018, 05:53 AM   #33
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(cored ) "It's also lighter but in most cases not stronger."


The thickness will determine weather the area will flex.


A 1 inch cored deck and a 1 inch solid deck will be same strength and stiffness , but the weight and insulation properties will different.
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Old 06-10-2018, 04:13 PM   #34
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As a wood boat enthusiast, I would never add any wood to a deck without first putting 2-3 coats of Smiths Clear Penetrating Epoxy on all sides first. It is the best end grain sealer and a fantastic bonding primer for structural epoxies. It will protect the balsa if any water gets in
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Old 06-11-2018, 08:39 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petehoovey View Post
As a wood boat enthusiast, I would never add any wood to a deck without first putting 2-3 coats of Smiths Clear Penetrating Epoxy on all sides first. It is the best end grain sealer and a fantastic bonding primer for structural epoxies. It will protect the balsa if any water gets in
I think yours is a great idea. And adding to your suggestion pertaining to plywood is to avoid using anything thicker than 1/4" if there is curvature. Much easier to laminate thin plywood than to bend thick rigid sheets
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Old 06-12-2018, 07:40 PM   #36
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Had a similar issues on our teak covered flybridge . . . Used fiberglass sandwiched coosa board, on a cleaned and dug out soft spot flybridge deck. Worked great, went back with slick coat and non-skid . . . Great improvement!Click image for larger version

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Old 06-24-2018, 03:37 PM   #37
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So, as mentioned earlier, she's in to get the teak off. Oddly, it appears as if the teak was an afterthought on this hull. Beneath it all is a nicely done anti-skid fiber glass sundeck...full of holes now from the deck screws. Either the teak was put on after delivery or the manufacturer molded every deck with the anti-skid and put the teak over it when ordered that way. Unfortunately with the anti-skid sections being slightly higher than the surrounding fiberglass the deck had to be faired with whatever compound it is that's left behind. I suspect the teak overlay wasn't flush on the deck in many areas. It was highly susceptible to water penetration in any spot the slats had space beneath them simply from flexing. It would have been minor movement but movement.

Luckily, despite all that, there hasn't been nearly as much water penetration as we feared. The only area that obviously needs re-coring (tap check) is under the techs feet and that's where some minor water damage can be found in the cabin below.

This is in Larry O'Rourke's shop and they did our fly bridge deck and steps a couple of years ago. The sundeck will be finished the same way as the step in the picture.

We're really looking forward to seeing her with the new deck and rub rail.
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Old 07-10-2018, 06:31 PM   #38
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Things are moving along. Badly damaged area of core was discovered around the transom gate. Hard to say for sure if the leak was in the deck screws , around the edge or at the stanchion bolts but it was enough to destroy the core and the fiberglass layer beneath. The bad core has been cut out and is ready for a new supporting bottom layer, core and top (the top of the master cabin head liner is exposed). All of the old glue and original anti skid surface has been ground off. Hopefully done this week but this is only one of the jobs being done so I doubt it.
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Old 07-11-2018, 09:17 AM   #39
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Do you mind sharing what the quote was for removing the teak and resurfacing your sundeck?
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Old 07-11-2018, 09:43 AM   #40
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It was around $3500 CAD (before tax) and included replacing up to 4 square feet of core. We added several other things to the job so our bill is substantially more than that but I believe that was the deck portion.
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